Streams

 

Bosnia

The Takeaway

Trial of Bosnian Serb Leader Closes

Thursday, October 02, 2014

Almost 20 years after the Srebrenica massacre, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic still thinks of himself as a victim of the media.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

The Assassination That Changed The World

Friday, June 27, 2014

Although a century has passed since the Archduke Franz Ferdinand was fatally shot and WWI was triggered, we’re still grappling with the consequences today. How one death irrevocably changed the nature of conflict, peace, and international relations.  

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Bosnia's First World Cup in Almost 25 Years

Friday, June 13, 2014

Sunday marks the first time Bosnia will compete at the World Cup since it established independence from Yugoslavia in 1992. Kenan Trebincevic, author of "The Bosnia List", reflects on what the tournament means for the country.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Bosnia List

Monday, February 24, 2014

Kenan Trebincevic discusses how his happy childhood was totally transformed once the civil war began in 1992 – and returning to Bosnia 20 years later. His memoir is called The Bosnia List.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Studying Abroad, Bosnia, Obesity and Age, Affordable Housing

Monday, February 24, 2014

On today's show: Time magazine writer Amanda Ripley talks about following three American high school students as they studied abroad for a year in countries with higher standards, better teaching, and more motivated students. Then, Kenan Trebincevic discusses his memoir, The Bosnia List, about returning to Bosnia 20 years after he and his family fled the war there. Time magazine reporter Alice Park on the problems of obesity in children. Plus, New York Observer reporter Chris Pomorski looks at why efforts to incorporate affordable housing into real estate development plans like Hudson Yards have had mixed results, and what changes the de Blasio administration plans to make.

WNYC News

In Possible Intervention in Syria, Bosnian New Yorkers See Their Experience

Thursday, August 29, 2013

For some Bosnian New Yorkers, the events in Syria have brought back memories of a time when they waited for the U.S. to intervene in their country.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Has Syria Become President Obama's Bosnia?

Tuesday, June 05, 2012

A little over a week into the multi-national military intervention last year in Libya, President Obama boasted that it only took his administration 31 days to intervene compared to the year it took international forces to send air power. Obama made the comparison to Bosnia with Libya, and now many are making the same with Syria.

Comment

The Takeaway

Defining the 'Tipping Point' for Intervention in War

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

All this week The Takeaway has followed the news out of Syria, where a horrific massacre at the hands of Syrian government troops in the village of Houla recently left 108 civilians dead, including a number of children, most murdered at close-point range. Are we at a tipping point in Syria?

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Serbian military leader Ratko Mladic faces trial for genocide and war crimes

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

The trial of Bosnian Serb military leader Ratko Mladic begins in the Hague Wednesday morning. Mladic is being tried before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia for war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide. Dan Damon reported on the Balkans War for years and is host of World Update for our partner the BBC.

Comment

The Takeaway

Siege of Sarajevo: Dan Damon Looks Back

Monday, April 16, 2012

The 44-month siege of Sarajevo was the longest in modern history, and marked the beginning of the conflict in Bosnia. During the siege, more than 100,000 people were killed and around 2.2 million fled their homes. It has now been 20 years since the siege began. Dan Damon, host of the BBC's World Update, joins us from Sarajevo, Bosnia.

Comment

The Takeaway

The Siege of Sarajevo: 20 Years Later

Thursday, April 05, 2012

Twenty years ago today, Serb militants opened fire on thousands of peace demonstrators in Sarajevo, the Muslim-led capitol city of the newly independent state of Bosnia-Hercegovina. The attack set off what would become the longest siege of a capitol city in modern warfare — lasting from April 5, 1992 to February 29, 1996. We talk to Nadja Halilbegovich, born and raised in Sarajevo, who still has mortar in her body from the days of the siege, and Barbara Demick, author of "Logavina Street: Life and Death in a Sarajevo Neighborhood," which hits bookstores this month.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Survivors Respond to Mladic Arrest

Friday, May 27, 2011

Ratko Mladic was arrested yesterday for genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity for his role as Army Chief of Staff during the Balkan wars. 8,000 Muslim men and boys were allegedly executed by Mladic's soldiers during the Srebrenica massacre. Dr. Denisa Kostovicova, Balkans expert and Senior Lecturer at the London School of Economics discusses the significance of his arrest and the importance of witness testimony in helping the country reckon with its past. Dejan Anastasijevic is a political journalist with the journal, Vreme in Belgrade. He helps contextualize the international significance of the arrest.

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Libyan Intervention

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

NPR correspondent Tom Gjelten talks about the status of the international intervention in Libya and how it compares with Bosnia.

Comments [16]

The Takeaway

Learning from the Past: US Military Conflicts

Monday, March 21, 2011

Although the role of the United States in Libya differs from its role in Iraq and Afghanistan, the intervention does resemble many other modern conflicts. Think back to the Gulf War and the Balkan wars throughout the 1990s. What can we learn from America's diplomatic and military strategy during those conflicts that might be relevant for our intervention in Libya? Joining us to analyze the position of the U.S. in Libya is Leslie Gelb, President Emeritus of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Comment

Studio 360

Sarajevo Blues

Friday, February 29, 2008

Aleksandar Hemon, the author of the novel Nowhere Man, was in Chicago in 1992 when the war began in his hometown of Sarajevo. He found out much as he could, through TV news, phone calls, and letters from friends -- and found solace through the ...

Comment

Studio 360

Aleksandar Hemon

Saturday, February 15, 2003

Alesksandar Hemon, the author of the novel Nowhere Man, was in Chicago in 1992 when the war began in his hometown of Sarajevo. He found out much as he could, through TV news, phone calls, and letters from friends back in Bosnia. Produced by Michele Siegel.

Comment