Streams

 

 

Books

Selected Shorts

Start from Happy

Thursday, April 16, 2015

The rocky road to romance

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Selected Shorts

Love is Funny

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Love can be funny, even when it’s not.

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Selected Shorts

But the One on the Right

Thursday, April 16, 2015

The wrong way to meet the right guy.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Preserving Glaciers in the Antarctic, Traditional Music in Lahore

Thursday, April 16, 2015

The fastest warming place on earth. Preserving traditional music in Pakistan. Jill Alexander Essbaum’s novel, Hausfrau. Dangerous gold mines in the Andes. The Theremin!

'All The Rage' Has All The Despair, And All The Confusion, Too

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Courtney Summers' new YA novel centers on a girl who was raped at a party, and the community that mostly doesn't believe her. Critic Tasha Robinson says the book's portrait of trauma packs a punch.

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'The Fishermen' Ventures Into Dark Waters

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Chigozie Obioma's novel follows a group of young boys who disobey their elders to spend afternoons fishing on the banks of an unlucky river, and the terrible consequences that flow from that choice.

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Morning Edition

From Horses To High-Rises: An Insider 'Unmasks' China's Economic Rise

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Over the past 25 years, former U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson watched China turn into the world's second largest economy. He explains what could halt the country's massive growth.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How One Isolated French Town Saved 3,500 Jews during WWII

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

A community of men and women living in the upper reaches of the Loire Valley offered sanctuary, kindness, solidarity and hospitality, knowing full well the consequences to themselves.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Becoming Captain Janeway, Confronting Motherhood

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Kate Mulgrew is known for the strong women she's played--Captain Janeway on Star Trek; the tough-as-nails "Red" on Orange is the New Black.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hillary's Campaign. A Star Trek Captain. Investigating Seafood.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Is Hillary and good at running for President? Kate Mulgrew! The French community that saved thousands in WW2. Did slaves catch your seafood?

Fresh Air

'The Children's Crusade': A Heavily Plotted Family Saga To Dive Into And Savor

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Ann Packer's latest is about a young Navy doctor who, after the Korean War, builds a house south of San Francisco. Fifty years later, his four adult children argue over the property.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Provocative Proposal for Doing Good

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

A professor of bioethics from Princeton argues in favor of "effective altruism" - that is, maximizing the number of people who benefit from your donations.

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'Cold Silver' Drags Epic Fantasy Through The Mud, Wonderfully

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Alex Marshall (a pseudonym for an established author taking an epic new path) creates a memorable heroine in Cobalt Zosia, a retired general who's drawn back into blood and struggle against her will.

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'Gutshot' Is Gloriously Grand Guignol

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Amelia Gray's new story collection is brimming with gore, guts, madness and deviance. Reviewer Colin Dwyer says Gray is reclaiming a place in literature for our bloody, clumsy, inconvenient bodies.

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Morning Edition

Revisiting The Night Abraham Lincoln Was Shot 150 Years Ago

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

On this day in 1865, John Wilkes Booth shot President Lincoln. Renee Montagne talks to author James Swanson at Ford's Theatre. (This piece initially aired on Feb. 12, 2009 on Morning Edition).

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WNYC News

Tales of Toxic Mushrooms and Dirty Bombs in New York

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Two new novels imagine the city experiencing apocalyptic events. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Tennessee Williams Invented Blanche DuBois

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

In Follies of God, Grissom describes how Williams came to his visions of Amanda Wingfield, Blanche DuBois, Stella Kowalski, and his other characters that transformed American theater.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Mathematical Proof That Defined The Universe, A Career

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Cédric Villani's work on one of the most surprising theories in classical physics earned him a Fields Medal, the most coveted prize in mathematics, in 2010.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Parched West and the Birth of a Theorem

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

The great Pacific Coast drought. The life and work of Tennessee Williams. Ballet star David Hallberg. French mathematician Cédric Villani.  

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Memoir in the Age of TMI

Monday, April 13, 2015

On this week’s Out Loud podcast, Leslie Jamison, who recently wrote about Chris Kraus’s memoiristic novels, and Joshua Rothman, who has written about the autobiographical fiction of Karl Ove Knausgaard and Elena Ferrante, join David Haglund and Amelia Lester to discuss the state of the memoir in an age of ubiquitous self-documentation via social media. They discuss the evolution of so-called “confessional literature,” why discussions of autobiographical writing are so often influenced by the gender of the writer, and how authors use memoir to explore ideas about both themselves and the world. In the not-so-distant past, Rothman says, “people kept diaries, and then you took a creative-writing workshop and wrote thinly disguised autobiographical fiction about your life. And now, part of what’s defined the last decade or so is a lot of new ways to accomplish this.”

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