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Fresh Air

'Florence Gordon' Isn't Friend Material, But You'll Appreciate Her

Monday, October 06, 2014

Brian Morton's novel features a 75-year-old woman — an icon of the Second Wave Women's Movement — who's a self-described "difficult woman." It's a witty, nuanced and ultimately moving novel.

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Fresh Air

How The Cold War And George Orwell Helped Make The Internet What It Is

Monday, October 06, 2014

In The Innovators, Walter Isaacson explains that Pentagon officials wanted a system the Russians couldn't attack, and 1984 made the public wary of new technology's Big Brother potential.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Alan Cumming Digs Up Family Secrets

Monday, October 06, 2014

When television producers invited Cumming to appear on a celebrity genealogy show in 2010, he discovered more than he bargained for about himself, his past, and his own father.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Derek Boogaard's Death Brought the Crisis of Concussions in Professional Sports to Light

Monday, October 06, 2014

Derek Boogaard was widely regarded as the toughest man in the NHL. His tragic death in 2011 helped break the silence about violence and concussions in professional sports. 

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Book News: Murakami Drops A New Story, Just As Nobel Week Begins

Monday, October 06, 2014

In "Scheherazade," he tells the tale of a captive listener — in more ways than one. Also: A big week to come includes the Nobel Prize announcement, "Super Thursday" and several notable books.

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Morning Edition

The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech

Monday, October 06, 2014

The Innovators, Walter Isaacson's new book, tells the stories of the people who created modern computers. Women, who are now a minority in computer science, played an outsize role in that history.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Taking a Beating: Politics in the Media, Concussions in Sports

Monday, October 06, 2014

Matt Bai on why 1987 was a turning point in the media and politics. Alan Cumming on family secrets. "Shakespeare’s Sonnets" at BAM. John Branch on hockey player Derek Boogaard.

All Things Considered

A 'Post-Post-Colonial' Take On The Violent Birth Of Modern Jamaica

Sunday, October 05, 2014

Marlon James' latest novel, A Brief History of Seven Killings, is not brief, and it contains many more than seven deaths. It's a portrait of Jamaica in the '70s, when gang warfare and reggae reigned.

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For Her First Trilogy, Jane Smiley Returns To Iowa, 'Where The Roots Are'

Sunday, October 05, 2014

Smiley used to live in Iowa and says something about the place still pulls on her imagination. Her new book, Some Luck, begins on a family farm in 1920.

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'Outpost': Stories Of Diplomacy In The World's Most Harrowing Places

Sunday, October 05, 2014

Former Ambassador Christopher Hill has written his memoir, Outpost: Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy. NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks to Hill about his tenure as a diplomat in Iraq.

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This 'Book Of Witches' Casts A Fascinating, Sobering Spell

Sunday, October 05, 2014

A new Penguin compendium of documents relating to three centuries of witch trials lays the blame on fractured communities and cruel governments — and draws unsettling parallels to current events.

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Deciphering The 'Priestly Mumbo-Jumbo' Of The Financial World

Sunday, October 05, 2014

If you're mystified by terms like "Libor," "stagflation" and "Grexit," you should pick up John Lanchester's new book, How To Speak Money, which aims to untangle the tortured language of finance.

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All Things Considered

Horror Of Horrors: Is H.P. Lovecraft's Legacy Tainted?

Saturday, October 04, 2014

Lovecraft, the author who famously invented Cthulhu, was also known for his highly racist opinions. This has created some controversy around the World Fantasy Award statue that bears his likeness.

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All Things Considered

One Military Family, Two Lost Sons: One To Combat, One To Suicide

Saturday, October 04, 2014

In The Invisible Front, journalist Yochi Dreazen tells the story of the Grahams, a close-knit family that lost two sons in the span of a year and then took up the fight against military suicide.

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Q&A: Plumbing The Mysteries Of The Teenage Brain

Saturday, October 04, 2014

In Age of Opportunity, psychologist Larry Steinberg applies neuroscience to risk-taking, peer influence, the boredom of high school and other adolescent conundrums.

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All Things Considered

Behind The Sunglasses: The Lives Of Secret Service Agents

Friday, October 03, 2014

This week, following a series of security lapses, the Secret Service director resigned. For a look at the agency beyond the scandal, author Ben Dolnick recommends the novel Big If by Mark Costello.

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NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of October 2, 2014

Friday, October 03, 2014

A death reunites old high school flames in Nicholas Sparks' The Best of Me, which appears at No. 13.

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NPR Bestsellers: Week Of October 2, 2014

Friday, October 03, 2014

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

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NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of October 2, 2014

Friday, October 03, 2014

Singer-songwriter Graham Nash shares the story of his life in the music world and beyond. Wild Tales appears at No. 14.

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NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of October 2, 2014

Friday, October 03, 2014

An onstage death is the unlikely harbinger of apocalyptic pandemonium in Emily St. John Mandel's Station Eleven. It debuts at No. 12.

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