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Books

Jon Krakauer Tells A 'Depressingly Typical' Story Of College Town Rapes

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Krakauer's Missoula looks at stories of women who have been sexually assaulted by people they know. He says rape is unlike other crimes because in other crimes, "the victim isn't assumed to be lying."

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

The Aleppo Codex

Sunday, April 19, 2015

The Aleppo Codex, the oldest, most complete, most accurate text of the Hebrew Bible went missing? Where did it go? This story was done in collaboration with Israel Story, the This American Life of Israel. http://en.israelstory.org/

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

The Codex Seraphinianus

Sunday, April 19, 2015

This book really got us excited. 12 x 36. 10 pounds. Everyone wanted to touch it. Borrow it. Talk about it. It felt like magic. And the title was just as mysterious – Codex Seraphinianus. Publisher Charles Mier tell us what the hell it is (and what is isn't). Want to see the first 74 pages of the "world's weirdest book"?

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At 84, Poet Gary Snyder Lives In 'This Present Moment'

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Poet Gary Snyder has hung with the Beats, studied Buddhism, worked as a logger and he's still going strong. He talks with NPR's Linda Wertheimer about his new collection, This Present Moment.

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'Orhan's Inheritance' Is The Weight Of History

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Aline Ohanesian's debut novel attempts to make sense of the events of 100 years ago, when the Ottoman Empire began forcing Armenians out of their homes in Turkey, leaving more than a million dead.

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NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of April 16, 2015

Friday, April 17, 2015

Malcolm Gladwell shows readers a new way to look at obstacles and disadvantage in David and Goliath. It appears at No. 3.

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NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of April 16, 2015

Friday, April 17, 2015

A Oslo contract killer's boss turns on him in Jo Nesbo's Blood on Snow. It debuts at No. 10.

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NPR Bestsellers: Week Of April 16, 2015

Friday, April 17, 2015

The lists are compiled from from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

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NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of April 16, 2015

Friday, April 17, 2015

At No. 1, Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch follows a motherless boy and a priceless painting in the aftermath of a terror attack.

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NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of April 16, 2015

Friday, April 17, 2015

Debuting at No. 8, Kate Andersen Brower's The Residence offers an intimate account of life at the White House.

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#NPRreads: From The Hell Of The North To 'Trash' Food

Friday, April 17, 2015

We highlight a 160-mile cycling race, reminiscences of an interview with the Oklahoma City bomber, the Finnish prison system, the nuclear deal with Iran, and the meaning of calling someone "trash."

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The Takeaway

Amit Chaudhuri on 'Odyssesus Abroad' and The Changing Identity of India

Friday, April 17, 2015

Writer Amit Chaudhuri discusses his latest novel, "Odysseus Abroad," and how the cultural inheritance of Indian writers spans multiple continents. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

A Healthier Way to Think About Sex

Friday, April 17, 2015

Alain de Botton, the Swiss philosopher whose new book is the kind you "read in bed and weep quietly as your partner sleeps beside you," examines the ways we think about sex.

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WNYC News

Making Art Out of Doomed Lives

Friday, April 17, 2015

Playwright Octavio Solis and novelist Justin Torres explain how their writing reflect their own struggles growing up, and that of many who are living on the edge.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The War Crimes of Charles Taylor's American Son, Chucky

Friday, April 17, 2015

Chucky Taylor was the American son of the infamous African dictator Charles Taylor. Raised by his mother in the Florida suburbs, he followed his father to Liberia at 17.

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On The Media

The Sad Puppy Takeover

Friday, April 17, 2015

The Hugo Awards, science fiction writing's highest honor, have become an ideological battleground. 

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Yoda? Is It Thou? Figure In 14th-Century Manuscript Looks Familiar

Thursday, April 16, 2015

A long time ago, in a place far away, a manuscript was created with an enigmatic figure who looks a great deal like a certain little — and yet powerful — green guy from the Star Wars films.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: Kate Mulgrew

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Captain Janeway prefers her chicken and potatoes fried.

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The New Yorker: Poetry

Robert Pinsky reads “At the Fishhouses” by Elizabeth Bishop

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Robert Pinsky reads and discusses with host Paul Muldoon a poem by Elizabeth Bishop and a poem of his own.

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The Takeaway

Retracing a Journey From Saigon to San Francisco

Thursday, April 16, 2015

In April 1975, author Andrew Lam fled Saigon for San Francisco. Forty years after the end of the Vietnam War, Lam reflects on his homeland and the formation of his American identity.

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