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Books

Growing Up Muslim In Massachusetts

Sunday, February 02, 2014

What exactly do Muslim men want? That's the theme of a book of essays coming out this week called Salaam, Love. Writer Haroon Moghul tackles growing up as an Indian Muslim kid in Massachusetts in an essay in the book. He talks with NPR's Rachel Martin.

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A Suburban Teen Saw The Sparkle Of 'Edie' — But Not The Pain

Sunday, February 02, 2014

In her early teens, author Megan Abbott felt trapped in her quiet community. She yearned for a life of glamour and art — like the one she found in a biography of Edie Sedgwick. When she grew up, Abbott realized just how much she'd misunderstood about the woman she'd idolized.

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Anna Quindlen Spins A Tale Of Middle-Aged Reinvention

Sunday, February 02, 2014

Still Life With Bread Crumbs follows a photographer who is no longer married, no longer needed as much by her grown son and no longer as successful as she used to be. When her funds start to dry up, she heads to a small, rural town for a fresh start.

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Texas Overhauls Textbook Approval To Ease Tensions Over Evolution

Saturday, February 01, 2014

The state Board of Education has decided to curtail the use of citizen review panels and instead give educators priority in selecting textbooks.

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Through The 'Dust,' Glimmers Of Brilliance

Saturday, February 01, 2014

Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor has been a voice in the literary world since one of her short stories won the Caine Prize for African Writing in 2003. Colin Dwyer reviews her debut novel, Dust, and says that while Owuor's talent shines in parts, the book gets bogged down in melodrama.

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Born Together, Then Torn Apart, In Civil War-Era Minnesota

Saturday, February 01, 2014

Nicole Helget's new novel, Stillwater, follows the lives of twins separated at birth — and raised on opposite sides of the tracks. Helget, who is proud to be called a "Minnesota novelist," tells NPR's Scott Simon about the photograph that inspired one of the book's central characters.

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How One Woman's Faith Stopped A School Shooting

Friday, January 31, 2014

Antoinette Tuff prevented a mass shooting at an elementary school last year by calming down the mentally ill gunman. Tuff speaks with host Michel Martin about her new memoir Prepared for a Purpose, and that fateful day in Georgia.

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Fresh Air

Midwestern Memoir Tracks 'Flyover Lives' Of Author's Forebears

Friday, January 31, 2014

Diane Johnson often writes about American heroines living in France, but when she began her memoir, she found herself drawn back to her native ground in America's heartland. Critic Maureen Corrigan says Flyover Lives "lets scenes and conversations speak for themselves, accruing power as they lodge in readers' minds."

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Book News: U.N.-Backed Report Finds 'Shocking' Levels of Youth Illiteracy

Friday, January 31, 2014

Also: Eleanor & Park author Rainbow Rowell has a deal for two graphic novels; Susan Sontag's biographer on reading her emails; Gary Shteyngart on his reading habits.

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Selected Shorts

Stephen Colbert Presents Stories of Male Rivalry

Friday, January 31, 2014

Men get into it, in two stories hosted by Stephen Colbert. A bawdy Cuban analyst taunts his neurotic patient in "The Treatment," and an older lawyer desperately races against a younger man on the Charles River in "Palais de Justice."

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On The Media

The Future of Oral History Projects

Friday, January 31, 2014

Brooke speaks with Jack Dunn, the Director of the Boston College News and Public Affairs office about what Boston College has done to protect the tapes from the Belfast Project and the future of academic oral history projects.  

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Microeconomics of Online Dating

Friday, January 31, 2014

Paul Oyer, Stanford business school economist and the author of Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating (Harvard Business Review Press, 2014), teaches microeconomics and trying out the internet dating scene. He shares the many parallels between both worlds.

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Features

Convicted Murderer to Award-Winning Novelist

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Novice crime fiction novelist Alaric Hunt has became an improbable literary success with his debut novel, Cuts Through Bone. His quick ascent is particularly impressive considering his work space: Hunt is serving a life sentence in South Carolina, and has been in prison since he was 19 years old. ugh-bone" target="_blank">originally appeared on the CBC Program Q with Jian Ghomeshi.

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: E. L. Doctorow

Thursday, January 30, 2014

E. L. Doctorow was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to talk about his novel, Andrew's Brain. He also told us what he's been reading and listening to recently. 

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Historical Trauma Makes For Thrilling Fiction In 'Officer And A Spy'

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Robert Harris' new An Officer and a Spy is a fictionalized account of the Dreyfus Affair — which, as critic Alan Cheuse notes, is tailor made for Harris' talents: there's an innocent victim at the center, a melodramatic villain, buffoonish military brass, crusading newspaper editors and a star turn from the novelist Emile Zola.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

E. L. Doctorow's Novel Andrew's Brain

Thursday, January 30, 2014

E. L. Doctorow talks about his latest novel, Andrew’s Brain, which goes into the mind of a man who has been the inadvertent agent of disaster more than once in his life. In the novel Andrew tells the story of his life, his loves, and the tragedies he’s experienced.

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Book News: Two Poems By Greek Poet Sappho Discovered

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Also: a fatal literary dispute in Russia; The Rumpus interviews Jerry Stahl.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Book Club: Random Family

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Leonard Lopate Show Book Club’s first selection for 2014 is Random Family: Love, Drugs, Trouble, and Coming of Age in the Bronx. Author Adrian Nicole LeBlanc spent years with one extended family in the Bronx to create a portrait of poverty, and of life in and of public housing, prison, and court. It received high praise when it was published in 2003, and remains as relevant and important a decade later. We chose it after we read Andrea Elliott's powerful New York Times series Invisible Child: Dasani's Homeless Life, which reminded us of the extensive reporting on a family's struggles with poverty in Random Family.

Share your thoughts and questions below!

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The Leonard Lopate Show

College Competition and Costs; Random Family; E. L. Doctorow; Microbeads in the Ocean; Diving in Gowanus Canal

Thursday, January 30, 2014

On today’s show: Laura Newland describes the intense competition to get admitted to the country’s top colleges and the pressures she faced on campus. Adrian Nicole LeBlanc talks about Random Family for this month’s Leonard Lopate Show Book Club. E. L. Doctorow discusses his latest novel, Andrew’s Brain. Find out how the microbeads that are found in many of our soaps, shampoos, and other household products stay in our water long after they’ve been washed down the drain. And we’ll talk to a man who swam in the Gowanus Canal last weekend.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Novelist Jamie Ford on "Songs of Willow Frost"

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Jamie Ford discusses his second novel, Songs of Willow Frost. Set in the 1920’s Depression-era Seattle, it follows a young orphan who has big dreams as he sets out in search of a woman who’s trying to escape her haunted past. 

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