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The Leonard Lopate Show

Looking Back at the Boston Marathon Bombings

Thursday, April 03, 2014

Boston Globe reporters Scott Helman and Jenna Russell look back at the Boston Marathon Bombing last April, from the preparations of the bombers to the emergency response to the massive deployment of city, state, and federal law enforcement personnel to apprehend the suspects. Long Mile Home: Boston Under Attack, the City's Courageous Recovery, and the Epic Hunt for Justice tells the story of the bombings and their aftermath.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Boston Marathon Bombing; Personal Data and Happiness; Soprano Patricia Racette; Drought

Thursday, April 03, 2014

On today’s show: Boston Globe reporters Scott Helman and Jenna Russell describe covering last year’s Boston Marathon Bombing. John Havens explains how we can reclaim the data and information that corporations are collecting about us—and use it to improve our well-being. Soprano Patricia Racette talks about her role as Maddalena in the Metropolitan Opera’s production of "Andrea Chénier." And we’ll find out how the drought that’s hitting the Southwest and California is quickly becoming a problem for the entire country.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Video: Rebecca Mead Talks About Some Things She Loves

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

Rebecca Mead, author of My Life in Middlemarch, on why she's read Middlemarch over and over, what she's reading now, and what it's like to be a staff writer at The New Yorker.

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All Things Considered

The Rise And Fall Of Stefan Zweig, Who Inspired 'Grand Budapest Hotel'

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The Viennese writer was once one of the world's most translated authors, but after his death he was forgotten — until now. Wes Anderson credits Zweig's writing at the end of his latest film.

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Book News: 'Socks, I've Worn A Few?' Flea Is Writing A Memoir

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist considers books "sacred." Also: Jimmy Carter signs 1,600 books in a little more than two hours; E-book sales rise (barely); Thomas Pynchon on being called paranoid.

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With Poetic Intensity, Kevin Powers Tackles The Terror Of War

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The novelist and Iraq veteran examines the lasting effects of war in his debut book of poetry, Letter Composed During a Lull in the Fighting. Reviewer Abigail Deutsch says the poems are piercing.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Battle to Pass the Civil Rights Act

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 passage has often been credited to the political leadership of President Lyndon Johnson or to the moral force of Martin Luther King. Yet, in The Bill of the Century: The Epic Battle for the Civil Rights Act, author and New York Times editor Clay Risen shows, the story is much bigger than those two men—and includes unceasing grassroots activism, ringing speeches, backroom deal-making, and hand-to-hand legislative combat.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Bicycling Alone Across the Country

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

New York Times obit writer Bruce Weber made the trip by himself at the age of 57, and wrote about it as it unfolded mile by mile. He talks about the challenges and rewards of strenuous physical effort — and the pleasures of a 3,000-calorie breakfast.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How a Collaborative Economy Could Change Capitalism

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

The emerging “Internet of Things” is moving us into an era of nearly free goods and services, bringing with it the rise of a global Collaborative Commons, which is changing capitalism as we know it.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Internet and Capitalism; Biking Alone Across the Country; Errol Morris on Donald Rumsfeld; Passing the Civil Rights Act

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

Jeremy Rifkin explains how the Internet is helping to make some goods and services almost free, and how that may lead to the eclipse of capitalism. Bruce Weber of the New York Times talks about his solo bicycle ride from coast to coast. Documentary filmmaker Errol Morris discusses his new film about Donald Rumsfeld, “The Unknown Known.” Clay Risen tells the story of how grassroots activism, stirring speeches, and backroom deal-making all helped ensure the passage of the Civil Rights Act.

Soundcheck

The Hold Steady Rocks Out Live; The Jesus Lizard's New Book

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

In this episode: The Hold Steady became an indie rock favorite because of the slice-of-life storytelling of lead singer/speaker Craig Finn and a kick-ass band. Now they've doubled down on the electric guitars for their first new album in four years, Teeth Dreams. Hear the band perform songs from the record live in the Soundcheck studio.

Then: David Yow, the indestructible frontman of Chicago alternative-rock band The Jesus Lizard, talks about the group’s (NSFW!) new coffee table book. As with all of the Jesus Lizard albums, this one has a title that’s a four-letter word: Book.

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All Things Considered

The Harlem Hellfighters: Fighting Racism In The Trenches Of WWI

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

The Harlem Hellfighters broke barriers as the first African-American infantry unit to fight in World War I. Their story is retold in a new graphic novel written by Max Brooks, author of World War Z.

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Fresh Air

On A 'Rigged' Wall Street, Milliseconds Make All The Difference

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

"The stock market is rigged," Michael Lewis says. In his new book Flash Boys, he describes how computerized transactions known as high-frequency trading are creating an uneven playing field.

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Fresh Air

This Tightly Choreographed Tale Of Ambition And Ballet Will 'Astonish'

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Maggie Shipstead tells the story of a disciplined dancer who can't make it into the spotlight. Critic Maureen Corrigan says Shipstead is "Edith Wharton with a millennial generation edge."

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Book News: Jane Goodall Blames Carelessness For Lifted Passages

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

The world famous primatologist says she didn't deliberately plagiarize in her book Seeds of Hope. Also: Keep your guard up for April Fools!

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'Frog Music' Sounds A Barbaric (But Invigorating) Yawp

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Emma Donoghue's new novel is a rich, raunchy tale of demimondaines and murder in smallpox-riven 1876 San Francisco. Critic Alan Cheuse says the novel sets a jaunty pace and shows a lot of leg.

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Morning Edition

Post Arab Spring, Where Do Islamist Parties Stand?

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

Steve Inskeep talks with author Shadi Hamid about his new book, Temptations of Power: Islamists and Illiberal Democracy in a New Middle East.

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Morning Edition

In Early Memoir, Bette Midler Adorned The Truth In Sequins

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

"There's a lot of embroidery in this book ... " Midler says. "It's all lies, except for like 10 percent." A new edition of A View From a Broad, originally published in 1980, is out this week.

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Morning Edition

Scratch That: One Cat's Struggle With Internet Stardom

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

How to Make Your Cat an Internet Celebrity might be the year's first essential new book. NPR's Renita Jablonski picks up the book, and her cat, to see if he has what it takes to be a star on the Web.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Extreme, Over-the-Top Joy of Bette Midler

Tuesday, April 01, 2014

The Divine Miss M was a uniting force early in the gay rights movement, and she continues to impact the city through more than just music.

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