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Selected Shorts

Pies Rule!

Friday, April 11, 2014

Emily and Melissa Elsen are the owners of the Brooklyn-based pie shop and café Four & Twenty Blackbirds.  They gave the SELECTED SHORTS team a tour, and talked about how cooking came down in their family, and about using seasonal ingredients and facing fear of crusts! 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Data, Dogs, Dutchmen and Daiquiris

Friday, April 11, 2014

Some dogs and cats are treated like humans. What kind of legal rights do they deserve? Plus: Amsterdam Mayor Eberhard van der Laan; the lime shortage that goes beyond your cocktail; the online security bug known as “Heartbleed” and what to do about it; and Mayor de Blasio’s first 100 days in office.

Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Love, Cake, and Kites

Friday, April 11, 2014

Serving up a Bisquick recipe, a serial lover, some kites, and a tour of a pie shop.

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Selected Shorts

A Serial Lover

Friday, April 11, 2014

This reading by Robert Sean Leonard of Mark Strand’s story “True Loves” is part of the SELECTED SHORTS program “Love, Cake, and Kites,” hosted by Parker Posey.

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Selected Shorts

Michael Chabon Meets Bisquick

Friday, April 11, 2014

This reading by David Furr of Michael Chabon’s essay “Art of Cake” is part of the SELECTED SHORTS program “Love, Cake, and Kites,” hosted by Parker Posey.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Pesticides, Veep, and What Happens When We Sleep

Friday, April 11, 2014

Andy Borowitz fills in for Leonard Lopate. On today’s show: we’ll find out what happens to the children’s brains when they’re exposed to pesticides. Anna Chlumsky talks about her role on the HBO show, “Veep.” Isla Morley discusses her new novel, Above. And this week’s Please Explain is about dreams and nightmares.

All Things Considered

After A Disaster In 'Family Life,' Relief Never Comes

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Akhil Sharma took over a decade to write his novel, Family Life, a mostly autobiographical account of an immigrant family and an accident that shatters their dreams for the future.

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WNYC News

Chapter Closes for Rizzoli Bookstore

Thursday, April 10, 2014

WNYC

Preservationists versus progress on 57th Street. Progress wins.

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Writers Of Color Flock To Social Media For A New Way To Use Language

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Writers of color are often told they must write for the "universal human," says poet Kima Jones. She explains how many of them take to social media to find their place among a different audience.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Second Arab Awakening

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Marwan Muasher, former Jordanian ambassador to Israel and the United States, current vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and now author of The Second Arab Awakening: And the Battle for Pluralism (Yale University Press, 2014), takes the long view of Middle Eastern politics, and discusses news of the day from peace talks in the region.

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Book News: What Are The World's Best New Novels? Libraries Weigh In

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Also: Aleksandar Hemon and Teju Cole in conversation; Mary Cheever has died; Ian McEwan's new book.

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Glossy As Film, This Handbook Was Made For The Multiplex

Thursday, April 10, 2014

John Lago is a killer intern — and, as it turns out, an actual killer. In The Intern's Handbook, Shane Kuhn tells his story in a fashion fit for a summer blockbuster, both for better and for worse.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Things That Are Too Big To Fail

Thursday, April 10, 2014

The biggest election on earth is underway in India. We'll hear about the candidates and issues on the ballot. Then: U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara explains why he doesn't think the Moreland Commission on public corruption should have been disbanded, as well as possible charges against big banks. Plus: the long (really long) view of the Arab Spring; Al Sharpton's past with the FBI; and sifting through Medicare data.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Actors We Love and Arranged Marriage

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Andy Borowitz fills in for Leonard Lopate today. Kristen Wiig and director Liza Johnson talk about their new film, “Hateship Loveship.” Rob Lowe discusses his new memoir. WNYC’s Arun Venugopal tells us about his new series Micropolis and the modern state of the old-fashioned practice of arranged marriage. And the Wall Street Journal’s Russell Gold talks about reporting on fracking over the last decade and how our quest for domestic energy has changed the national economy.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rob Lowe on How to Love Life

Thursday, April 10, 2014

"When you’re a puppy, you’ve got to move over and let the big dogs eat," and other things Rob Lowe learned has learned from Warren Beatty and from life in Hollywood.

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Embracing Atheism After A Wild Journey To Find God

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Author Barbara Ehrenreich is known for her work on poverty and other social issues. But her latest book, Living with a Wild God, reveals how she became an atheist.

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All Things Considered

The New Age: Leaving Behind Everything, Or Nothing At All

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Older generations might have left behind physical letters, photographs and journals. But much of that is digital now. Saving and organizing it all is a new challenge for librarians and writers alike.

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Kima Jones, On Black Bodies And Being A Black Woman Who Writes

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

In her poetry, Kima Jones explores racial and sexual identity in the modern world — and the future. Nostalgic and assertive, her work revolves around a recurrent protagonist: the person of color.

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Book News: Archie Comics Is Going To Kill Off Archie

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Also: Artist Damien Hirst will write an autobiography; Gabriel Garcia Marquez has left the Mexico hospital where he was being treated for a lung infection.

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'Astonish Me' Is An Artful, Elegant Dance

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Maggie Shipstead's latest is named after Sergei Diaghilev's famous admonition to his dancers. Reviewer Annalisa Quinn says that, while not astonishing, it's a "lemon tart of a book, lovely and neat."

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