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All Things Considered

'Financial Times' Picks Apart Picketty, Sparking An Argument

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Is the story of rising inequality presented by Thomas Piketty's Capital in the 21st Century an exaggeration? A Financial Times editor said as much recently. Now, the argument has begun.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

'Eat, Pray, Love' for Depressed Shut-ins

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

That's how Colson Whitehead describes his new book, in which he searches for meaning at high-stakes poker tables.

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Fresh Air

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

In China's Second Continent, Howard French explores the Chinese presence in 15 African countries. The relationship goes beyond economics: more than a million Chinese citizens have migrated to Africa.

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Book News: U.K. Plan To Cut American Lit From Tests Prompts Fierce Backlash

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

A push to protect To Kill A Mockingbird. Also: Notable books coming out this week include a wildly original collection of poetry and a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad thriller.

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Tom Robbins Takes A Bite Out Of Life In 'Peach Pie'

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Robbins applies his signature verbal gusto to his own life in a new memoir — and reviewer Jason Sheehan says your enjoyment may depend on how much you really want to hear about Robbins himself.

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Morning Edition

How Soviet Kitchens Became Hotbeds Of Dissent And Culture

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

After Stalin's death, people in the Soviet Union could begin to debate politics again without fear of repression. This "thawing" took place in private kitchens, where music and art flourished, too.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Adelle Waldman's The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Adelle Waldman's debut novel made a big impression when it was published last year—it was named one of the best books of the year by The New Yorker, Slate, NPR, and The New York Times. The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. follows writer Nate Piven, a young rising star in New York's literary world who can’t quite figure out his romantic life. It’s a portrait of a flawed and sometimes infuriating modern man searching for happiness, and it’s an honest look at how Nate thinks about women, sex, and love.

Leave your comments and questions about the book!

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Prison and Politics in Russia, Poker, and Poverty

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Masha Gessen discusses the brutality and corruption of Russia’s prison system  and the case of the Arctic 30, a group of Greenpeace activists arrested and jailed by Vladimir Putin and charged with piracy. Adelle Waldman will be here for the Leonard Lopate Show Book Club! She’ll be talking about her novel The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. Colson Whitehead tells us about playing in the World Series of Poker and what his experience at high-stakes card tables taught him about the human condition. Plus, economist William Easterly looks at the global effort to eradicate poverty, and argues that traditional approaches usually trample the rights and freedoms of the poor.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Economists, Dictators, and the Rights of the Poor

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Solutions for global poverty often fail to address the systemic political factors that create poverty.

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The Takeaway

Takeaway Book Club Preview: 'To Rise Again at a Decent Hour'

Monday, May 26, 2014

Takeaway producer and book critic Mythili Rao previews the first book on The Takeaway Book Club's summer reading list: "To Rise Again at a Decent Hour" by Joshua Ferris.

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Killed The Mockingbird? American Classics Cut From British Reading List

Monday, May 26, 2014

U.K. Education Secretary Michael Gove has decided that the English literature list for a national exam needs to be more English, so he is swapping American texts in the curriculum for British ones.

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Stories Of Loss, Brightened By Luminous Language

Monday, May 26, 2014

The nine tales in Elizabeth McCracken's Thunderstruck deal with death, tragedy and darkness, but the collection shines due to the mesmerizing strangeness of its extraordinary images.

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Soundcheck

Francine Prose Picks Three; White Hinterland Plays Live; Perfect Pussy On Gender And Kool Keith

Monday, May 26, 2014

In this episode: Author Francine Prose recently released a novel called Lovers At The Chameleon Club, Paris 1932 -- a kaleidoscopic portrait of one very complicated woman's life and those affected by it in the lead-up to World War II. She joins us to talk about the actual Parisian club and Henry Brassai photograph that inspired her tale -- and shares three songs that helped her get into her characters' heads while writing it all down.

In this episode: Musicians and songwriters on Soundcheck often say that “getting out of your comfort zone” is a good way to create fresh and surprising work. For Casey Dienell, who records under the name White Hinterland, getting out of her comfort zone meant scrapping her new album (twice), moving back to her hometown, and building a studio in her parents’ basement. Hear the dynamic songwriter perform songs from that album, Baby, in the Soundcheck studio.

 

 

Then: The noise-punk band Perfect Pussy, led by singer Meredith Graves, recently lent Soundcheck host John Schaefer a pair of earplugs and let loose. Watch them play in the Soundcheck studio and talk about everything from the term “cisgender” to Kool Keith.

 

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Veterans, World Cup, and Youth Sports

Monday, May 26, 2014

Veterans Reflect on VA Controversy | How the World Cup is Transforming Brazil | Who Took All the Fun Out of Youth Sports? | Takeaway Book Club Preview: 'To Rise Again at a Decent Hour'

The Leonard Lopate Show

Protesting the Draft and Going to Prison During the Vietnam War

Monday, May 26, 2014

Bruce Dancis became the first student at Cornell to defy the draft by tearing up his draft card and soon became a leader of the draft resistance movement in the 1960s.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Diaries of Diplomat George F. Kennan

Monday, May 26, 2014

America’s most respected foreign policy thinker of the 20th century, who came up with “containment,” America’s Cold War strategy, kept a diary for 88 years.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Adventures and Troubles in Foreign Lands and at Home

Monday, May 26, 2014

On today’s Memorial Day show we're re-airing some favorite interviews from March. Shane Bauer, Joshua Fattal, and Sarah Shourd—the three Americans who were captured by Iranian forces while they were hiking and were held for two years—tell us about being in prison and then finally being released. Carl Hoffman explains how he uncovered new evidence about the disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in New Guinea in 1961. We’ll look at the diaries of George F. Kennan, who devised the policy of containment during the Cold War. Bruce Dancis talks about becoming an anti-war activist in the 1960s—and going to prison for resisting the draft during Vietnam.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rumors, Cannibals, and Michael Rockefeller's Mysterious Disappearance

Monday, May 26, 2014

The explorer vanished in New Guinea in 1961, and despite exhaustive searches, no trace of him was ever found. More than 50 years later, one journalist thinks he knows what happened.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Three American Hikers Talk About Being Imprisoned in Iran

Monday, May 26, 2014

Shane Bauer, Joshua Fattal, and Sarah Shourd were hiking Iraqi Kurdistan when they mistakenly crossed the Iranian border, were arrested, and were held in Iran's Evin Prison for two years on charges of espionage.

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All Things Considered

Obscure Producer's Clear Impact On 'The Dirty Business' Of R&B

Sunday, May 25, 2014

In his short life, 1960s producer-songwriter Bert Berns made an indelible mark. He made many hits, but a changing industry brought tension to the studio, as told in the new book, Here Comes the Night.

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