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All Things Considered

'Freedom Summer' And 'The Watsons': Powerful TV About A Civil Rights Journey

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

This story in the "Book Your Trip" series features NPR TV critic Eric Deggans on two books turned TV shows about civil rights: PBS's Freedom Summer and Hallmark Channel's The Watsons Go to Birmingham.

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All Things Considered

Book Review: 'No Country'

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Alan Cheuse reviews Kalyan Ray's new novel, No Country. It's a family drama that crosses continents and time, from the U.S. to Ireland to India over 150 years.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Eat, Pray, GOOOOOOOOOOOOAAAAALLLL!!

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Guess who is obsessed with the World Cup? Best-selling author Elizabeth Gilbert. Here she is discussing her viewing habits, live-tweeting the games, the US as underdog, and how she got so in to soccer in the first place.

And make sure to listen to the full interview with Gilbert, where she talks about, you know, books.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Elizabeth Gilbert's Summer Reading List -- Yours?

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

No surprise, your favorite authors have favorite authors. On Tuesday, best-selling author Elizabeth Gilbert will be on to discuss her latest novel, "A Signature of All Things," her approach to writing, and some of her favorite summer books.

Here is her list, if you're looking to pick up something this summer.

Books Gilbert Is Hoping to Read This Summer

Some Of Gilbert's All-Time Summer Favorites

Now -- what's on yours? Add it to the comments and we'll compile on the site.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

To Rise Again at a Decent Hour, a Novel by Joshua Ferris

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Joshua Ferris discusses his new novel, To Rise Again at a Decent Hour. It’s about Paul O'Rourke, a dentist made of contradictions: he loves the world, but doesn't know how to live in it and he’s an atheist not quite willing to let go of God. When someone begins to impersonate Paul online, and he watches in horror as a website, a Facebook page, and a Twitter account are created in his name, he realizes that the online "Paul" might be a better version of the real thing.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Capitalism, Inequality, and Delhi's Transformation

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

A look at the transformation of Delhi through its people—from drug dealers to metal traders to psychoanalysts to billionaires—and what they reveal about how capitalism is changing the city.

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Book News: James Patterson Wants To Give Books To New York City Kids

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Also: The Moscow Times pays a visit to a secret Soviet erotica collection; a poem by late Nobel laureate Wisława Szymborska.

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'Hidden Sea': What Happens When Fantasyland Doesn't Want You?

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

In A.M. Dellamonica's new Child of a Hidden Sea, a marine scientist discovers her secret heritage in an alternate, watery version of Earth — a place which adamantly doesn't want to be discovered.

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Exclusive First Read: You CAN Phone Home Again In 'Landline'

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Read an exclusive pre-publication excerpt of Landline, the new novel from Eleanor & Park author Rainbow Rowell. Love, heartache, sitcom success and a magic phone — did we mention the magic phone?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Elizabeth Gilbert on Summer Reading and Writing

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

This segment originally aired live on June 24, 2014. An edited version was included in a best-of episode of The Brian Lehrer Show on August 15th. The unedited audio can be found here. 

What are you reading this summer? Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love and her latest novel (now in paperback) The Signature of All Things: A Novel(Penguin Books, 2013) shares her view on what makes a great summer read and what she's learned about success and failure as a writer -- and why she's a World Cup soccer superfan.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Elizabeth Gilbert, Regulations and Transformations

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

The city council is considering new regulations for the car wash industry. City Council member Julissa Ferreras (D-21) explains what the new rules would mean for workers, owners and customers. Plus: Elizabeth Gilbert helps create a summer reading list; and a look at the transformation of historic churches into condos in Brooklyn – which was long known as the “borough of churches.”

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rising Again: Transformation in Delhi, a Rediscovered Cole Porter Score

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

On today’s show: Rana Dasgupta explores the city of Delhi through its people—from drug dealers to metal traders to psychoanalysts to billionaires—and what they reveal about one of the world’s fastest-growing cities. We’ll hear about “The Ambassador Revue,” a Cole Porter score that was recently rediscovered in Italy! Joshua Ferris talks about his latest novel, To Rise Again at a Decent Hour. And The New Yorker’s Sarah Stillman talks about the industry of halfway houses, treatment centers and private-for profit probation companies that have sprung up recently.

The New Yorker: Poetry

Yusef Komunyakaa reads Marilyn Hacker

Monday, June 23, 2014

Yusef Komunyakaa reads Marilyn Hacker

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All Things Considered

Strange And Beautiful Love Stories Light Up 'Paper Lantern'

Monday, June 23, 2014

The stories in Stuart Dybek's latest collection concern themselves with strong feelings, and sometimes with crazed longings. Reviewer Meg Wolitzer finds them "a little alarming, a little wonderful."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

It Can Be Good to be Stubborn

Monday, June 23, 2014

Flexibility is usually seen as a virtue, but constitutional law professor Richard H. Weisberg makes the case for intransigence, stubbornness, and inflexibility.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jón Gnarr Accidentally Became the Mayor of Reykjavik and Changed the World

Monday, June 23, 2014

Satire, dinosaurs, and a fight against corruption. That's not the plot of a sci-fi movie - it's a recipe for political success. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

FDR, Detroit, and Arming America During World War II

Monday, June 23, 2014

In 1941 President Roosevelt realized we needed weaponry to fight the Nazis—most important, airplanes—so he turned to Detroit and the auto industry for help. The Ford Motor Company went from making automobiles to producing the airplanes, which made all the difference between winning and losing the war. A. J. Baim discusses how they did it. His book The Arsenal of Democracy: FDR, Detroit, and an Epic Quest to Arm and America at Warcenters on Henry Ford and his tortured son Edsel, who, when asked if they could deliver 50,000 airplanes, made an outrageous claim: Ford Motor Company would build a plant that could make a “bomber an hour.”  

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Soundcheck

Fender Rhodes: A History Of The Portable Musical Revolution

Monday, June 23, 2014

In just a few decades, the Fender Rhodes electric keyboard has infiltrated a diverse array of musical genres and uses thanks to its portability and an unmistakable sound. A new documentary and book charts the extraordinary rise and impact of the instrument.

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Studio 360

How Would You Spend Stephen King's Money?

Monday, June 23, 2014

When Stephen King publishes a novel with the same title as your modestly selling book, you can expect a big bump in (mistaken) sales. 

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Book News: Prominent Middle East Scholar Fouad Ajami Dies

Monday, June 23, 2014

Also: Spanish police break up a suspected book-counterfeiting ring; notable books of the week.

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