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Morning Edition

Revisiting The Night Abraham Lincoln Was Shot 150 Years Ago

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

On this day in 1865, John Wilkes Booth shot President Lincoln. Renee Montagne talks to author James Swanson at Ford's Theatre. (This piece initially aired on Feb. 12, 2009 on Morning Edition).

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WNYC News

Tales of Toxic Mushrooms and Dirty Bombs in New York

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Two new novels imagine the city experiencing apocalyptic events. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Tennessee Williams Invented Blanche DuBois

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

In Follies of God, Grissom describes how Williams came to his visions of Amanda Wingfield, Blanche DuBois, Stella Kowalski, and his other characters that transformed American theater.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Mathematical Proof That Defined The Universe, A Career

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Cédric Villani's work on one of the most surprising theories in classical physics earned him a Fields Medal, the most coveted prize in mathematics, in 2010.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Parched West and the Birth of a Theorem

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

The great Pacific Coast drought. The life and work of Tennessee Williams. Ballet star David Hallberg. French mathematician Cédric Villani.  

The New Yorker: Out Loud

Memoir in the Age of TMI

Monday, April 13, 2015

On this week’s Out Loud podcast, Leslie Jamison, who recently wrote about Chris Kraus’s memoiristic novels, and Joshua Rothman, who has written about the autobiographical fiction of Karl Ove Knausgaard and Elena Ferrante, join David Haglund and Amelia Lester to discuss the state of the memoir in an age of ubiquitous self-documentation via social media. They discuss the evolution of so-called “confessional literature,” why discussions of autobiographical writing are so often influenced by the gender of the writer, and how authors use memoir to explore ideas about both themselves and the world. In the not-so-distant past, Rothman says, “people kept diaries, and then you took a creative-writing workshop and wrote thinly disguised autobiographical fiction about your life. And now, part of what’s defined the last decade or so is a lot of new ways to accomplish this.”

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All Things Considered

Take It From David Brooks: Career Success 'Doesn't Make You Happy'

Monday, April 13, 2015

The New York Times columnist wrote The Road to Character after seeing the gratitude for life of people who tutor immigrants. He thought, "I've achieved career success ... but I haven't achieved that."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Bird's Eye Perspective of the Planet, and Its Problems

Monday, April 13, 2015

Living on the International Space Station, witnessing Earth from afar, gave Ron Garan a new point of view on the vexing problems we face today.

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Fresh Air

How Young People Went Underground During The '70s 'Days Of Rage'

Monday, April 13, 2015

Bryan Burrough's new book describes the Weather Underground and other militant groups' tactics to protest the government. He interviews former radicals who had never gone on the record before.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

When Puerto Rico Rebelled

Monday, April 13, 2015

Former New York State Assemblyman Nelson A. Denis talks about the little-known 1950 nationalist rebellion against U.S. military rule in Puerto Rico

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The Leonard Lopate Show

America's "Treasure Hunt" for Asian Art

Monday, April 13, 2015

The history of Chinese Art in North America, from the Opium Wars, to the Boxer Rebellion, to Mao Zedong's 1949 ascent.

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All Things Considered

Günter Grass, Who Confronted Germany's Past As Well As His Own, Dies At 87

Monday, April 13, 2015

In 2006, the Nobel prize-winning author of The Tin Drum admitted that as a teen during World War II, he had served with the Waffen-SS — the combat unit of the Nazi Party's elite military police force.

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Günter Grass, Nobel-Winning Author Of 'The Tin Drum,' Dies At 87

Monday, April 13, 2015

Grass was one of Germany's leading intellectuals after World War II, but admitted in 2006 that he had served in the Waffen SS. News of his death was announced by his publisher.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Old Masters Reimagined in Brooklyn, How Chinese Art Came to America

Monday, April 13, 2015

An astronaut's orbital perspective on the planet. Kehinde Wiley's inventive portraits. Chinese Art in North America. The women who transformed Washington D.C. during the civil war.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Hillary Clinton Announces; Opting Out of State Tests; The Great Migration

Monday, April 13, 2015

Hillary Clinton's presidential plans; the Iran deal in Farsi and English; opting out of standardized tests; Puerto Rico's 1950 rebellion; art and oral history from the Great Migration.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Women Who Forever Changed Washington D.C. During the Civil War

Monday, April 13, 2015

Cokie Roberts introduces the resilient women who remained in America's capital after the declaration of secession, chronicling their momentous experiences.

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All Things Considered

From Harpies To Heroines: How Shakespeare's Women Evolved

Sunday, April 12, 2015

In her new book Women of Will, Tina Packer traces Shakespeare's maturation — and, she argues, the corresponding transformation of his female characters from caricatures to fully-realized humans.

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In 'Distant Marvels,' A Witness To Revolutions Tells Cuba's Story

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Chantel Acevedo's latest novel opens in 1963 and focuses on octogenarian Maria Sirena, part of a Cuban generation that lived through both the war of independence from Spain and the Cuban Revolution.

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Adventures In Vietnam — Street Food, Love And Taking Chances

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Journalist Graham Holliday moved to Vietnam in the '90s and immersed himself in the culture through food. That meant getting "a little bit" poisoned, finding the best Bún chả — and meeting his wife.

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All Things Considered

A Dark, Funny — And Vietnamese — Look At The Vietnam War

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Viet Thanh Nguyen grew up in America with war movies like Apocalypse Now and Platoon, which offer accounts of the war focusing on Americans. His new novel, The Sympathizer, follows a Vietnamese spy.

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