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The Brian Lehrer Show

Jody Williams' Path to the Nobel Peace Prize

Wednesday, March 06, 2013

Jody Williams, anti-landmine activist, and author of My Name is Jody Williams: A Vermont Girl's Winding Path to the Nobel Peace Prize, talks about her activism and her work on women's issues through the Nobel Women's Initiative.

Comments [2]

Soundcheck

Being A 'Top Dog' On Stage

Monday, February 25, 2013

For their latest book, authors Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman took on the subject of competition -- and the science behind why some people win and others lose. We talk with the Top Dog authors about the history of competition in the arts, the science behind stage fright, and the notion that competition doesn't jibe with creativity. 

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

It's Idiomatic

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Christine Ammer, author of more than three dozen reference books, including The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, Second Edition, gets to the heart of American English idiomatic phrases and explains the listener-submitted idiom, "scared the daylights out of me."

Tomorrow's Assignment:  Update an idiom for the digital age.  What should "turning a new leaf" become, for example?  

 

Comments [3]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Defeating the Culture of Bullying

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Emily Bazelon, senior editor at Slate and Political Gabfest Radio panelist, talks about her new book, Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy.

Comments [13]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Widowhood: Moving Forward

Monday, February 18, 2013

Becky Aikman, author of the book Saturday Night Widows: The Adventures of Six Friends Remaking Their Lives, talks about forming an unconventional support group for widows, and how to move past grief in an optimistic way.

Comments [6]

The Brian Lehrer Show

After Petraeus

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Fred Kaplan, War Stories columnist for Slate, talks about his new book, The Insurgents: David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War, and the president’s choices for his second-term national security team.

→ EVENT: Fred Kaplan will be reading from The Insurgents at the UWS Barnes & Noble on Jan. 15 at 7PM.

Comments [31]

Soundcheck

The Smiths' Story Endures, A Quarter-Century Later

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

The Smiths remain one of the most popular and influential bands ever to hit the British scene, even 25 years after the group's break up. Tony Fletcher joins us to discuss his 700-page tome, A Light That Never Goes Out: The Enduring Saga of The Smiths.

Comment

Radiolab

Brain Fodder Vol. 1

Friday, September 28, 2012

A collection of the strange and wonderful things on the minds of Radiolab staffers this week.

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

Adam Gopnik and Avi Steinberg on how Mormonism is going mainstream.

Monday, August 06, 2012

Adam Gopnik and Avi Steinberg on how Mormonism is going mainstream.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety

Monday, July 09, 2012

Daniel Smith, author of Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety, talks about his new book and his past struggles with crippling anxiety.

→ EVENT: Release party and reading | Wednesday, July 11, 7pm | BookCourt (163 Court St., Brooklyn)

→ EVENT: Reading and book signing | Thursday, July 12, 7pm | Book Revue (313 New York Ave., Huntington, Long Island)

THE SCRAPBOOK: Smith cites "Singin' in the Rain" as a calming influence during bouts of anxiety. Inspired by his example, here are some of listeners' favorite movies for anxious moments.

Comments [14]

The Takeaway

The Documents that Define America

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Since our country's founding, Americans have debated the speeches and tracts sacred to our founding, from the Exodus story to the Declaration of Independence. In this election year, politicians and pundits constantly debate the "true" meaning of America's core canon, asking what the founding fathers or Martin Luther King, Jr. or Eleanor Roosevelt would think of immigration reform, or affirmative action, or birth control. In his new book, author and professor Stephen Prothero has collected these core texts in his new book, "The American Bible."

Comments [12]

The Takeaway

Excerpt: "The Man Without a Face"

Friday, March 02, 2012

Excerpted from "The Man Without a Face" by Masha Gessen

Encouraged by his former deputy’s meteoric rise, Sobchak decided to end his Paris exile and go back to Russia in the summer of 1999. He returned full of hope and even more full of ambition. As Sobchak was leaving Paris, Arkady Vaksberg, a forensics specialist turned investigative reporter and author with whom Sobchak had become friendly during his years in France, asked him whether he hoped to return to Paris as an ambassador. “Higher than that,” replied Sobchak. Vaksberg was sure the former mayor was aiming for the foreign minister’s seat: the rumor in Moscow’s political circles was that Sobchak would head up the Constitutional Court, the most important court in the country.

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On Being

Scott-Martin Kosofsky — Legends to Live By [remix]

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Could a Yiddish text from the Middle Ages serve as a guide to living now? Book composer and typographer Scott-Martin Kosofsky revives unlikely sources of "customs" for leading a modern life and marking sacred time. For Hanukkah and all the seasons upon us

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On Being

[Unedited] Scott-Martin Kosofsky with Krista Tippett

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Could a Yiddish text from the Middle Ages serve as a guide to living now? Book composer and typographer Scott-Martin Kosofsky revives unlikely sources of "customs" for leading a modern life and marking sacred time. For Hanukkah and all the seasons upon us

Comment

Features

City Libraries Want Young Readers to Turn Over a New Leaf

Thursday, September 22, 2011

The "New Chapter" initiative lifts overdue fines for patrons under 18 at New York Public Library, Brooklyn Public Library and Queens Library branches through October 31.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Ron Suskind on the 'Confidence Men' Controversy

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

White House officials are already criticizing journalist Ron Suskind's book "Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington, and the Education of a President," which just came out this week, despite having cooperated with Suskind for years. Among the book's more controversial passages are depictions of the Obama White House as dysfunctional, with mean, misogynistic economic advisers undermining a clueless president at every turn. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said, "I lived the original and the reality I lived, we all lived together, bears no relation to the sad little stories I heard reported from that book." White House Press Secretary Jay Carney went even further and accused Suskind of plagiarism, saying, "one passage seems to be lifted almost entirely from Wikipedia."

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Slate Culture Gabfest

Slate: The Culture Gabfest, Hail Caesar Edition

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

In this week's Culture Gabfest, our critics Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens, and Julia Turner discuss the new movie Rise of the Planet of the Apes, starring motion-capture master Andy Serkis. Next, they discuss the current state of the book review, especial

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Features

Lou Reed, Laurie Anderson and Martha Wainwright Pay Homage to Shel Silverstein

Friday, August 05, 2011

On Saturday, the sidewalk ends in Central Park. The author, poet, songwriter and cartoonist Shel Silverstein -- known to many for children's books like Where the Sidewalk Ends -- will be lauded in a, um, "Shelebration" as part of Central Park's SummerStage series.

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The Takeaway

Jonathan Coe on 'The Terrible Privacy of Maxwell Sim'

Wednesday, March 09, 2011

In today’s world, it’s not unusual to wake up alone, drive to work alone, and eat our meals alone. It’s expected that most of our communicating will take place through machines, rather than face to face. And it’s not unusual for us to develop relationships with those machines, whether they’re our cell phones or GPS devices. But what does all this isolation do to us? And does technology make our isolation better or worse?

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The Takeaway

Ron Reagan on his Father's 100th Birthday

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

100 years ago this February, a ten-pound future president was born in Illinois, feet first. His name was Ronald Wilson Reagan. While he eventually came to be a household name, first as an actor, then as a politician, the details of Ronald Reagan's personal life have always been more or less private. Even his own son, Ron Reagan, wasn’t fully sure of his dad’s story, until he set out to learn more about him. 

 

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