Streams

 

 

Black History Month 2012

American RadioWorks

State Of Siege: Mississippi Whites and the Civil Rights Movement

Saturday, February 25, 2012

Saturday, February 25, 2012 6AM on 93.9 FM and NJPR; Saturday, February 25, 2012 at 2PM on AM 820; and Sunday, February 26 at 8PM on AM 820 and NJPR

No state in the South was more resistant to the struggle for black equality and none more violent than Mississippi. Drawing on newly discovered archival audio and groundbreaking research on the civil rights era, State of Siege brings to light the extraordinary tactics whites in Mississippi used to battle integration and the lasting impact of that battle in American politics today.

Comments [1]

Specials

Maya Angelou’s Black History Month Special

Friday, February 17, 2012

Friday, February 17th at 8PM on 93.9 FM, AM 820, and NJPR; Sunday, February 26th at 9PM on AM 820

Maya Angelou defines Black History, as it is embraced in our popular culture with an emphasis on the civil rights era and a poetic acknowledgement of late activist, Rosa Parks. In this one hour historical trek, Dr. Maya Angelou renders a poetic portrait of the day-to-day lives of African Americans during the civil rights era, when artists and activists, musicians and ministers joined hands with people from all walks of life to bring about a historic change in our culture.  Program features Congressman John Lewis, Poet Nikky Finney, Mary J. Blige, Dr. Julianne Malveaux and Ambassador Andrew Young.

Comments [1]

Specials

I, Too, Sing America: Music in the Life of Langston Hughes

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Wednesday, February 15th at 8PM on 93.9 FM, AM 820, and NJPR; Saturday, February 18th at 6AM on 93.9 FM and NJPR; Saturday, February 18th at 2PM on AM 820; Sunday, February 19th at 8PM on 820 AM and NJPR

Langston Hughes, an enduring icon of the Harlem Renaissance, is best-known for his written work, which wedded his fierce dedication to social justice with his belief in the transformative power of the word. But he was a music lover, too, and some of the works he was most proud of were collaborations with composers and musicians.  I, Too, Sing America will dive into the songs, cantatas, musicals and librettos that flowed from Hughes’ pen. As he did with his poetry, Hughes used music to denounce war, combat segregation and restore human dignity in the face of Jim Crow. 

Comments [2]

Specials

The Harlem Renaissance: Music, Religion, and the Politics of Race

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Tuesday, February 14th at 8PM on 93.9 FM, AM 820, and NJPR; Sunday, February 19th at 9PM on AM 820

During the vibrant years of the Harlem Renaissance, music, religion, and spirituality were interconnected - not just in the religious setting of the church, but in the jazz club, the dance hall, the rent party, even the political street rally.  Writer Carl Hancock Rux, Reverend Calvin Butts of the Abyssinian Baptist Church, historian Farah Griffin, Professors Josef Sorett and Obery Hendricks, and others explore these powerful interconnections.  Hosted by Norris J. Chumley of the Columbia University Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life.

Comments [1]

Specials

Back of the Bus: Mass Transit, Race and Inequality

Sunday, February 12, 2012

Sunday, February 12, 2012 at 9PM on 820 AM and Monday, February 13, 2012 at 8PM on 93.9 FM, 820 FM, and NJPR

In the '60s, highway projects nearly destroyed African American communities. Now in this collaborative reporting project from Transportation Nation and WNYC, "Back of the Bus" investigates why America's people of color still struggle for equal treatment in public transportation.

Comment

American RadioWorks

Say It Loud: Great Speeches on Civil Rights and African American Identity

Saturday, February 11, 2012

Saturday, February 11 at 6AM on 93.9 FM and NJPR; Saturday, February 11 at 2PM on AM 820; and Sunday, February 12 at 8PM on AM 820 and NJPR

This American RadioWorks program traces the last half-century of black history through stirring, historically important speeches by African Americans from across the political spectrum.

Comments [3]

Operavore

The Shoulders On Which They Stand

Friday, February 10, 2012

The trailblazing African-American tenor George Shirley recently wrote an essay on race in opera that serves as a reminder of the opera field's past inequities and potential for progress, writes Fred Plotkin.

Read More

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's New Children's Book on African American Inventors and Black History

Friday, February 10, 2012

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a jack of all trades — and a master of each. During his 20 year NBA career with the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Lakers, he won six NBA championships and a record six regular season MVP Awards. He also made a big splash as an actor, debuting in Bruce Lee's "Game of Death" and making notable cameos in films like "Airplane!." And now, he's the author of "What Color Is My World?," a book for children about African-American inventors.

Comment

Operavore

Realism vs. Racism: Opera's Casting Call

Tuesday, February 07, 2012

A scholarly book looks at the many depictions of people "of color" in opera, including the thorny stage practice in which performers apply heavy makeup to play leading roles such as Otello and Aïda. Fred Plotkin considers.

Read More

Comments [7]

Specials

Still Swinging, Still Classic: A Musical Biography of Pioneering Pianist Hazel Scott

Sunday, February 05, 2012

Sunday, February 5th at 9PM on AM 820; Thursday, February 16th at 8PM on 93.9 FM, AM 820, and NJPR

A musical portrait of the wife of late Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. and Julliard-trained pianist who performed in the most prestigious concert halls in the world. Known as the “darling of Café Society,” Hazel Scott became a trailblazer in Hollywood; an outspoken civil rights activist which made her a political target; and ultimately, an outcast, ostracized by the Church community because of her music.

Comments [1]

Specials

The Tavis Smiley Show: Memories of the Movement

Saturday, February 04, 2012

Part I: Saturday, February 4th at 4PM on AM 820; Part II: Saturday, February 11th at 4PM on AM 820

The years of the Civil Rights Movement are counted among the most volatile, yet vibrant, in American history. In our Black History month special, Memories of the Movement, The Tavis Smiley Show celebrates the courage, conviction and commitment of the everyday people who made extraordinary contributions to American social progress. Memories of the Movement features poignant, humorous, unheard or little known stories from a number of well-known civil rights icons.

Comments [1]

To The Best of Our Knowledge

Integration Stories

Saturday, February 04, 2012

Saturday, February 4th at 6AM on 93.9 FM and NJPR; Saturday, February 4th at 2PM on AM 820; and Sunday, February 5th at 8PM on AM 820 and NJPR

It's been more than four decades since the Civil Rights movement ended racial segregation in America. Yet few would say African-Americans are now fully integrated – or assimilated. In this hour produced by Wisconsin Public Radio’s To the Best of Our Knowledge, African American writers talk about race….and how black history – from segregation to the Great Migration to the culture of hip hop – continues to shape our racial conversation today.  Program features Pulitzer Prize winner Isabel Wilkerson, Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, NPR’s Michele Norris and others.

Comments [1]