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Biology

The Leonard Lopate Show

Creation

Friday, January 22, 2010

Director Jon Amiel and Randal Keynes, Charles Darwin’s great-great-grandson, talk about the film "Creation," based Keynes’s book Creation,. It depicts Darwin as a brilliant man sure of his scientific skills but tormented by his daughter Annie’s death and by the realization that he has lost his faith. "Creation" opens ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Other Brain

Friday, January 22, 2010

Neuroscientist Douglas Field, explains how glia, which make up approximately 85 percent of the cells in the brain, work. In The Other Brain: From Dementia to Schizophrenia, How New Discoveries about the Brain Are Revolutionizing Medicine and Science, he explains recent discoveries in glia research and looks at what ...

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Radiolab

Animal Minds

Monday, January 11, 2010

Communicating across species -- from bringing pets to church, to a rescued whale that may have found a way to say thanks.

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Radiolab

Spindle Cells

Monday, January 11, 2010

Is empathy a purely human quality? In this segment, Jad and Robert explore the inner workings of the spindle cell, those long neurons that might connect thoughts to feelings, with the help of Dr. Patrick Hof and Jonah Lehrer. Then they talk to Dr. Clive Wynne again to ...

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Studio 360

Birdman

Friday, December 04, 2009

Paul Bartlett was slogging through a PhD in animal behavior when he decided he would rather be painting. Bartlett finished his studies, left behind the zebra finches in his research lab, and now depicts razorbills, puffins, and other shore life in his native Scotland. Produced by

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WNYC News

Local Doctors Lobbying for Proton Radiation Treatment Center

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Some of the region’s top hospitals are hoping to bring the first proton radiation treatment center to the area. The tiny particles are uniquely effective in treating certain malignant tumors without causing collateral damage.

Only a handful of facilities around the world have the equipment, which ...

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Orchid Hypothesis

Monday, November 23, 2009

A new theory of genetics asserts that mankind's most troublesome genes may be vital to our adaptability, if given the right kind of nurturing. David Dobbs, contributor to The Atlantic, writes about the orchid hypothesis in this month's issue and discusses his findings.

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Studio 360

Spencer Wells

Friday, November 20, 2009

Where did we come from? Evolutionary biologist Spencer Wells is pretty close to the answer. He's the National Geographic "Explorer-in-Residence" and heads an initiative called the Genographic Project. By collecting DNA samples from people around the world, he's tracing the paths of human migration, and he's ...

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Radiolab

New Nice

Monday, October 19, 2009

Brian Hare tells us the story of Dmitri Belyaev, a geneticist and clandestine Darwinian who lived in Stalinist Russia and studied the domestication of the silver fox. Through generations of selectively breeding a captive population, Belyaev noticed not only increased docility, but also unexpected physical changes. Why did these ...

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Radiolab

In Defense of Cheats

Monday, September 07, 2009

Carl Zimmer plays defense lawyer, trying to exonerate parasites for their wrongs, while Jad and Robert argue in defense of the victims. Our producer Lulu Miller comes in to moderate a lightning round of: "Parasites: are they evil, or are they awesome?" The parasites in question are the ...

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Radiolab

Sculptors of Monumental Narrative

Monday, September 07, 2009

Dickson Despommier tells us the story of how the insatiable millionaire John D. Rockefeller turned an eye to the untapped market of the American South and ended up eradicating the hookworm (and, in the process, a number of other awful afflictions) with an ingenious contraption. Then Pat Walters ...

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Radiolab

The Scratch

Monday, September 07, 2009

When executive producer Ellen Horne was expecting a baby, she really had no particular intention of becoming a self-made expert on a parasite named Toxoplasma gondii. Robert Sapolsky explains to us why Ellen had reason to worry when she was scratched by her cat, and he traces the unlikely ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Climate Change and Evolution

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Increasing temperatures on the planet might mean catastrophe for some species -- including humans -- but it might present new opportunities for others. Science writer Carl Zimmer explains why researchers believe that some species are already adapting to a warmer world. You can read his article here.

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WNYC News

Schering-Plough Shareholders Support Merck Acquisition

Friday, August 07, 2009

More than 99 percent of shareholders of drugmaker Schering-Plough support being bought by bigger New Jersey neighbor Merck. The acquisition would make Merck the world's second-biggest drug maker by prescription medicine sales, just behind Pfizer. Barbara Ryan, a pharmaceutical industry analyst with Deutsche Bank, says ...

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Jews and Organ Donation

Monday, July 27, 2009

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WNYC News

Lilly First Tenant in Science Center

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

A science complex under construction along the East River got its first official tenant yesterday. The research division of drug company Imclone Systems will take over four floors once the first tower is completed next summer. WNYC's Matthew Schuerman has more.

REPORTER: Mayor Bloomberg has said ...

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WNYC News

Study: Air Pollution May Lower IQ

Monday, July 20, 2009

A study measuring the effects of air pollution on pregnant mothers suggests their children might have slightly lower IQ’s. Researchers placed air monitors on the mothers during pregnancy, tracked the children for five years, and then measured their IQ’s. Doctor Frederica Perera says those in ...

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Radiolab

In Defense of Darwin?

Monday, July 13, 2009

Robert challenges Richard Dawkins on a number of sticky spots on the subject of biological evolution.

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The Takeaway

A New Way to Make a Baby? Creating Sperm in the Lab

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

Scientists in the U.K. claim that for the first time they've created human sperm from embryonic stem cells. While the advance is a huge scientific leap that could allow infertile men to have children, it also raises ethical concerns. For more on this new step in reproductive biology, The Takeaway turns to Clive Cookson, Science Editor for the Financial Times.

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WNYC News

Natural History Museum Stores Endangered Species Tissues

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Tissue samples from endangered species will now be stored at the Museum of Natural History, under a new agreement with the U.S. Parks Service. The museum already freezes its own samples taken from whales, butterflies, and other creatures in seven cryovats. They look like giant, ...

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