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Biology

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Jellyfish

Friday, July 08, 2011

A series of new studies has revealed that jellyfish are far more than mindless blobs that can spoil your day at the beach. On today’s Please Explain, Steve Bailey, Curator of Fishes at the New England Aquarium, and Marine Biologist and Chief Aquarist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Michael Howard discuss why jellyfish are much more complex and interesting than scientists once thought. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ants and Warfare

Monday, July 04, 2011

Entomologist and National Geographic photographer Mark Moffett looks at the similarities between ants and humans, specifically our use of warfare.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Humans and Ants

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Entomologist and National Geographic photographer Mark Moffett looks at the similarities between ants and humans, specifically our use of warfare.

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Features

Sauropods, Inside and Out at the American Museum of Natural History

Friday, April 15, 2011

A new exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History takes a look at how the biggest dinosaurs that ever existed survived—tiny brains, long necks and all. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Cloning Man’s Best Friend

Friday, January 07, 2011

Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter John Woestendiek discusses the questions about the boundaries of science, commerce, and ethics that arise with the cloning of pets. Dog, Inc.: The Uncanny Inside Story of Cloning Man’s Best Friend takes readers behind the scenes of this industry.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: The 2010 Census of Marine Life

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Dr. Ron O'Dor, Senior Scientist, Census of Marine Life, Consortium for Ocean Leadership, tells us about the first Census of Marine Life—a 10-year exploration carried out by scientists from 80 nations. It reveals what, where, and how much lives and hides in the world’s oceans. He’ll explain how the census was carried out and what it shows about life under water.

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Radiolab

An Equation for Good

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

In a brief snippet from a conversation Robert had with Richard Dawkins at the 92 Street Y in New York City, we learn that natural selection is often a brutal arms race, inherently full of suffering and cruelty. But if Darwin's big idea is really predicated on pain and selfishness, ...

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On Being

Doris Taylor — Stem Cells, Untold Stories [remix]

Thursday, September 30, 2010

Using stem cells, Doris Taylor brought the heart of a dead animal back to life and might one day revolutionize human organ transplantation. She takes us beyond lightning rod issues and into an unfolding frontier where science is learning how stem cells wo

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On Being

[Unedited] Doris Taylor with Krista Tippett

Thursday, September 30, 2010

Using stem cells, Doris Taylor brought the heart of a dead animal back to life and might one day revolutionize human organ transplantation. She takes us beyond lightning rod issues and into an unfolding frontier where science is learning how stem cells wo

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Lyme Disease

Friday, September 03, 2010

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in North America, and the number of reported cases has been steadily climbing over the last decade. We’re joined by Brian Fallon, associate professor of clinical psychiatry and director of the Lyme and Tick-borne Diseases Research Center at Columbia University Medical Center, and Dr. Carolyn Britton, associate professor of clinical neurology at Columbia University Medical Center, and chief neurologist for the Lyme research studies conducted by Columbia’s Lyme and Tick-borne Diseases Research Center. They’ll discuss how the disease is spread, diagnosed, and treated, and how we can protect ourselves while we’re outside this summer.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

White-Nose Syndrome Worsening

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Nina Fascione, Executive Director of Bat Conservation International, discusses new research that predicts regional extinctions of one of the most common bat species, the little brown myotis, within two decades due to White-Nose Syndrome. She’ll explain what White-Nose Syndrome is, the recent study, and efforts being made to save the species.

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Studio 360

Turn On. Tune In. Drop Out.

Friday, August 13, 2010

"If I were at work right now, I'd be paid to have these thoughts." With that thought, Zack Booth Simpson dropped out of high school — then started reading biology textbooks and designing video games. Now he's at a university — not as a student, but as a ...

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The Takeaway

America's First Test-Tube Baby, Now 29, Gives Birth

Monday, August 09, 2010

Thousands of babies are conceived through in-vitro fertilization (IVF) each year, but 29 years ago, when Elizabeth Comeau was born, the in vitro method was considered strange and miraculous. Comeau was America's first "test-tube baby." Now, at 29 years old, she's just given birth to her own baby boy.

(Correction: an earlier version of this story referred to Comeau as the "world's first test-tube baby" - she was actually the first in the United States. Louise Brown, born in the UK in 1978, was the world's first baby conceived via IVF.)

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Lyme Disease

Friday, July 16, 2010

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in North America, and the number of reported cases has been steadily climbing over the last decade. We’re joined by Dr. Brian Fallon, associate professor of clinical psychiatry and director of the Lyme and Tick-borne Diseases Research Center at Columbia University Medical Center, and Dr. Carolyn Britton, associate professor of clinical neurology at Columbia University Medical Center, and chief neurologist for the Lyme research studies conducted by Columbia’s Lyme and Tick-borne Diseases Research Center. They’ll discuss how the disease is spread, diagnosed, and treated, and how we can protect ourselves while we’re outside this summer.

Comments [38]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Geneticist Harmit Malik on Paleovirology

Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Geneticist Dr. Harmit Malik, Associate Member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute in Seattle, and Assistant Professor of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine, explains his work in paleovirology. He was awarded the Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise, which is given to immigrants age 38 or younger. He also won the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering from President Obama.

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Radiolab

Even the Worst Laid Plans?

Monday, June 28, 2010

Soren Wheeler takes us to Butte Montana--where an open pit copper mine’s demise leads to a toxic lake filled with corrosive runoff. Reporter Barret Golding goes to visit the pit lake, and writer Edwin Dobb tells Soren the story of a pile of dead snow geese who made an ill-fated ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Obsession for Cats

Monday, June 14, 2010

Pat Thomas, general curator for the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo, discusses the recent discovery that big cats—cheetahs, jaguars and tigers, who are well known for their obsession about scent—love the smell of Calvin Klein’s Obsession for Men cologne. The scent is now widely used in zoos and the findings are even changing how large felines are studied in the field.

 

It’s been known for a while that big cats like cheetahs, jaguars and tigers are obsessive about scents, but it’s not just meat. Researchers have recently discovered that big cats also love the smell of Calvin Klein’s Obsession for Men cologne. The scent is now widely used in zoos and the findings are even changing how large felines are studied in the field. We’ll talk to Pat Thomas, general curator for the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo (http://www.bronxzoo.com/).

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The Leonard Lopate Show

New Species in New Guinea

Tuesday, June 08, 2010

Ornithologist Bruce M. Beehler , Senior Research Scientist with Conservation International, discusses leading a 2008 expedition to the Foja Mountains in New Guinea that discovered about 30 new species never previously described.

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Radiolab

Henrietta's Tumor

Monday, May 17, 2010

We end with the extraordinary story of Henrietta Lacks. Though she died of cervical cancer in 1951, she unknowingly held the key to unlocking medical advancements (from polio vaccines to chemotherapy drugs) in her tumor cells. After taking a biopsy of Henrietta's cervical cancer, researcher Dr. George Gey and his ...

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Radiolab

Famous Tumors

Monday, May 17, 2010

Say hello to the growth that killed Ulysses S. Grant, & get to know the woman whose cancer cells changed modern medicine.

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