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Biology

The Takeaway

Symbiotic Relationships & The Circle of Life

Thursday, August 22, 2013

When studying nature, we often focus on predatory relationships. But there are other kinds of relationships in nature as well. Some, like the suckerfish and shark, fall under the category of commensalism. Others, like coral and algae, are built on mutualism, or symbiosis. Katie McKissick, also known as “Beatrice the Biologist” online, explains.

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New Tech City

Genspace Brings DIY Biolab to Brooklyn

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

At the Genspace community biolab in Downtown Brooklyn, citizen scientists are coming together to explore the basics of biology — and maybe discover something that will transform our lives.

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On Being

Sylvia Earle — Her Deepness [remix]

Thursday, August 08, 2013

Oceanographer Sylvia Earle has done something no one else has -- walked solo on the bottom of the sea, under a quarter mile of water. She tells what she saw -- and what she has learned -- about the giant, living system that is the ocean.

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On Being

[Unedited] Sylvia Earle with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 08, 2013

Oceanographer Sylvia Earle has done something no one else has -- walked solo on the bottom of the sea, under a quarter mile of water. She tells what she saw -- and what she has learned -- about the giant, living system that is the ocean.

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Radiolab

Every Night You Lose More Than A Pound While You're Asleep (For The Oddest Reason)

Friday, June 21, 2013

Every night you lose weight while you sleep. Everybody does. Sometimes two pounds. Something inside you when you close you eyes is gone by morning. It's not bathroom-related. It's something else. What could it be?

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Radiolab

The Love That Dared Not Speak Its Name, Of A Beetle For A Beer Bottle

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

What's that beetle doing to that beer bottle? The beetle dropped down from the sky, grabbed the bottle's bottom, keeps hugging and hugging it, even when being attacked by ants, and it won't — refuses to — let go. It can't be the beer it's after. The beer is at the other end. What's going on?

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Radiolab

Why Cry?

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

Ever wonder why humans cry? A professor of behavioral neurology answers some questions, and helps give us a better understanding of how a feeling in our guts can come out as water in our eyes.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Humanism and Primates

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Drawing on his primate research, Frans de Waal, director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, professor of primate behavior at Emory University and author of The Bonobo and the Atheist: In Search of Humanism Among the Primates, argues morality comes from within, not from religious belief.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Gut Wrench: Human Digestion 101

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Mary Roach tells you everything you every wanted to know (and maybe some stuff you didn’t) about human digestion. In Packing for Mars, she wrote about space toilets and for RadioLab she stuck her hand inside a real-live cow’s stomach to experience digestion from the inside. Her new book is Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Life in the Deepest Ocean

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Wall Street Journal reporter Jonathan D. Rockoff talks about recent expeditions that have discovered plentiful microbial life in the deepest, darkest parts of the ocean—some 6.8 miles below sea level.

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Radiolab

Krulwich Wonders: My Yeast Let Me Down: A Love Song

Monday, January 28, 2013

NPR

Nathaniel, a young Berkeley biologist, met a beautiful yeast who promised opportunity and adventure, but once they got together, Nathaniel was clumsy, the yeast not what he'd hoped, and their romance? Well, it didn't work out. It's now a song. Sung by Nathaniel. The yeast, lacking vocal chords, is silent.

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Radiolab

Mapping the Bilingual Brain

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Chris Berube -- intrepid Radiolab intern, and monolinguist -- sets aside his ego to delve into a listener's question about intelligence and speaking more than one language.

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Radiolab

Brain Fodder Vol. 6

Thursday, December 06, 2012

We don't know about you, but we've got a giant trampoline, a burger refill denied, and buffaloing English grammar on our minds...

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The Takeaway

Expanding the Sign Language Lexicon for Science

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

Regardless of the state of the law, people with disabilities have been finding their own way in the able-bodied world for some time. For example, in a highly technical field where terminology and vocabulary are highly specialized, how do you communicate efficiently? Caroline Solomon is a professor of biology at Gallaudet University who is trying to answer this question.

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Radiolab

Moms and Inheritance: Tracing the Maternal Line

Tuesday, December 04, 2012

Ever wonder why so many of the inheritance studies are about men? Molly Webster had that question too...

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The Takeaway

The Jellyfish that Could Hold the Secret to Immortality

Friday, November 30, 2012

Nearly 25 years ago, a young marine biologist stumbled upon a jellyfish that refused to die. They jellyfish would age, but when it became sick or suffered an injury, it would age in reverse until it reached its earliest stage of development...at which point it would begin its life cycle all over again. Could this little creature hold the secret to immortality? Novelist and essayist Nathaniel Rich explains.

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Radiolab

On Goose Bumps

Monday, November 26, 2012

It turns out these little flashing studs of flesh used to do something very specific (and useful!) for us. Lulu Miller explains how goose bumps used to protect us.

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Radiolab

Revenge of the Caterpillars: A Footnote to “Contagious Laughter”

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

A seemingly cuddly caterpillar becomes the Terminator in Latif Nasser's story about a not-so-distant epidemic in America's bluegrass country...

 

 

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Radiolab

Leaving Your Lamarck

Monday, November 19, 2012

Jad starts us off with some wishful parental thinking: that no matter how many billions of lines of genetic code, or how many millions of years of evolution came before you, your struggles, your efforts, matter -- not just in a touchy feely kind of way, but in ways that ...

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Radiolab

Inheritance

Monday, November 19, 2012

Stories of nature and nurture slamming into each other, & shaping our biological blueprints.

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