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Biology

The Leonard Lopate Show

Long-Term Love on the Brain

Thursday, January 08, 2009

Passionate love doesn’t have to decline over time. A new study has found that the brains of people in long-term, loving relationships show activity in the same regions that are activated when people first fall in love. Dr. Arthur Arons, co-author of the study, is a social psychologist at Stony ...

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Radiolab

How To Cure What Ails You

Monday, December 29, 2008

Now that we have the ability to see inside the brain without opening anyone's skull, we'll be able to map and define brain activity and peg it to behavior and feelings. Right? Well, maybe not, or maybe not just yet. It seems the workings of our brains are rather too ...

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Radiolab

Diagnosis

Monday, December 29, 2008

Humans love to solve problems. This hour, Diagnosis -- our attempt to find out what's wrong, and give it a label.

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Radiolab

Race

Monday, December 15, 2008

Radiolab asks what race is, and whether it's fixed or fluid, genes or culture?

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Radiolab

Race and Medicine

Monday, December 15, 2008

BiDil was the first drug approved by the FDA for a specific racial group. We want to know what the ramifications are for using skin color as a diagnostic tool for diseases and disorders that can't be seen. Producer Soren Wheeler talks to Dr. Jay Cohn, developer of BiDil ...

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WNYC News

It's Getting Tougher to Breathe in Some New York City Schools

Monday, December 08, 2008

More than half are in Brooklyn, with large numbers in Queens and Manhattan. Local sources of pollution include Brooklyn's Pfizer Plant and Navy Yard, Long Island City's Keyspan Power Station, and New Jersey refineries.

But EPA Regional Spokesman Elias Rodriguez says the newspaper's findings are limited, ...

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WNYC News

Cool New Treatment for Cardiac Arrest

Thursday, December 04, 2008

City ambulances will be taking a new tack with patients struck by cardiac arrest. Starting next year, EMS paramedics will take many heart attack victims to certain hospitals where their bodies can be cooled down, even if those hospitals with specialized cooling equipment are farther ...

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Radiolab

Sperm

Monday, December 01, 2008

We examine our beginnings, take a tour of the animal kingdom, and ponder a world where frozen sperm can last for all eternity.

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Radiolab

Sperm Tales

Tuesday, October 07, 2008

Two short pieces on sperm that hint at the new ideas and amazing stories we came across once we started following the trail of this wriggly little cell.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Top Scientists

Thursday, September 25, 2008

We talk about some of the most exciting scientific research happening right now. Leonard talks to two Lasker Award winners: Stanley Falkow, who’s receiving the Lasker Special Achievement Award for his 51-year career as a top microbiologist, specializing in how harmful bacteria works; and

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Radiolab

Chasing Bugs

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

Remember the first time you ever saw an ant hill? That parade of black insects pouring in and out of a small sand mound...most of us stopped, looked, and then moved on to other parts of the playground. E. O. Wilson is the kid who never took his eyes off the mound.

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WNYC News

New York Doctor Wins Genius Grant

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

A local doctor who studies ways to slow and reverse the spread of infectious diseases, such as AIDS and tuberculosis, has received a genius grant from the John D and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation — one of 25 recipients of the prestigious award this year. ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Is Pollution Poisoning China’s Children?

Thursday, August 21, 2008

With the Beijing Olympics underway, everyone’s talking about how air pollution there is affecting athletes’ performances. But how is it affecting Chinese children’s physical and intellectual development? Dr. Frederica Perera, director of Columbia University’s Center for Children’s Environmental Health, joins us to explain how China’s pollution problem may be poisoning ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Pigeon, a.k.a. Superdove

Monday, August 18, 2008

Pigeons’ ancestral homes are on the cliffs of sea coasts. How did they become so suited to city life? Courtney Humphries, author of the new book Superdove: How the Pigeon Took Manhattan…And the World, explains how pigeons became city dwellers, and why those who see them as mere urban ...

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Primordial Cheer

Thursday, August 14, 2008

A new study says that our reactions to winning are a genetic remnant from our primate ancestors. Jessica Tracy, Psychology Professor at the University of British Columbia and co-author of the report talks about its findings.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Dominion

Wednesday, July 30, 2008

The study of evolution examines the past, but what about the future? Paul Ehrlich, professor of population studies and biological sciences at Stanford University, discusses how the human ability to adapt to the environment could have catastrophic consequences. He and Anne Ehrlich are the authors of The Dominant ...

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Radiolab

(So-Called) Life

Monday, April 07, 2008

The uneasy marriage of biology and engineering raises big questions about the nature of life.

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Radiolab

Genes on the Move

Monday, April 07, 2008

Biology class is all about putting living things into categories, based on their differences. And creatures are different because they have different genes. But life wasn’t always like that. In this segment, Steve Strogatz, an applied mathematician at Cornell, tells us about a radical theory that says that way back ...

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Radiolab

Genghis Khan

Monday, September 10, 2007

By looking at our genes we can link ourselves to our parents, grandparents, and ancestors long long ago. Tatiana Zerjal and Chris Tyler Smith tell the tale of discovering the genetic relation of over 16 million men in Central Asia.

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Radiolab

The Unconscious Toscanini of the Brain

Tuesday, August 14, 2007

How does the brain produce a thought? Or experience a unitary, whole, synchronized perception of a cup of coffee? For neuroscientists, this is the Mount Everest of questions. We have a look at one possible theory (that a thought is like lots of little neurons singing together in harmony) and ...

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