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Biology

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Complicated Lives, and Social Roles, of Elephants

Monday, April 06, 2015

For the last twenty-three years, Caitlin O’Connell has been a keen observer of the complicated friendships of an entourage of bull elephants in Etosha National Park, Namibia.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

What Your Poo Says About You

Sunday, March 15, 2015

At the University of Colorado, microbiologist Rob Knight is exploring a new frontier -- the human microbiome.   His work could revolutionize medicine.  But first we all need to get a lot more comfortable talking about poop.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Grow Your Own Clothes

Sunday, March 15, 2015

What if we could harness nature to grow clothing for us?  London-based fashion designer Suzanne Lee explains how she grows cloth inside giant vats of fermented tea. It's part of a future industry she calls "bio-couture".

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

On Our Minds: Being Cold

Sunday, March 01, 2015

Winter. I am getting sick of this winter. It’s hard to get around. I’m never outside. I hate scraping and shoveling. . . And, I’m cold. And most likely you are cold too.

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On Being

Helen Fisher — Love and Sex and Attachment

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Helen Fisher wields science as a sobering, if entertaining, lens on what feel like the most meaningful encounters of our lives. She is a leading anthropologist/explorer on the new frontier of seeing inside our brains when love and sex happen.

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On Being

[Unedited] Helen Fisher with Krista Tippett

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Helen Fisher wields science as a sobering, if entertaining, lens on what feel like the most meaningful encounters of our lives. She is a leading anthropologist/explorer on the new frontier of seeing inside our brains when love and sex happen.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Humans: The 70,000 Year History

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Growing Aliens in a Laboratory

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Science writer Corey Powell describes how recent discoveries in the lab are changing minds about what extraterrestrials might look like and where they might be found. 

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Studio 360

Decoding Nature’s Most Elaborate Mating Dances

Thursday, December 11, 2014

A Yale ornithologist argues that our definition or art is way too narrow. It’s not just a human activity — lots of plants and animals have aesthetic experiences, too.

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Top 5 @ 105

Five Amazing Links Between Music and Biology

Thursday, October 16, 2014

 While the natural world has been a muse to composers, music in return has proven a boon to plants. We unearthed our following top five examples of how they relate.

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PRI's The World

A scientist on the cutting edge of Ebola research calls for calm and focus

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

The grim forecasts for the growing Ebola epidemic shouldn't spark panic, says one geneticist. Instead, the response to the outbreak calls for worldwide collaboration and a globally crowdsourced battle plan.

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PRI's The World

Sierra Leone celebrates the end of its lockdown, but Ebola still looms

Monday, September 22, 2014

The Ebola stricken nation of Sierra Leone was on lockdown over the past weekend as part of a national effort to stop the spread of Ebola. During the curfews, thousands of health workers and volunteers went house-to-house, looking for suspected Ebola cases.

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PRI's The World

No matter where in the world you are, opting out of childhood vaccines can be a catastrophic choice

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

The new NOVA special, "Vaccines: Calling the Shots," explores the lingering global resistance to vaccination campaigns. Case studies from around the world explain just how bad the impact can be when groups opt out of childhood shots.

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PRI's The World

Universities are screening students from West Africa for Ebola as they return to school

Thursday, September 04, 2014

There are an estimated 10,000 students from Nigeria, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea attending American colleges and universities. Many US campuses have put Ebola health screening measures in place to make sure students aren't infected.

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PRI's The World

Two infected Americans are now Ebola-free, but doctors aren't sure why

Friday, August 22, 2014

Two Americans who contracted Ebola in West Africa have been given a clean bill of health. It's one positive story that has come out of the West African Ebola outbreak, but what role did the experimental drug ZMapp, whose availability has sparked controversy, have on their recovery?

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PRI's The World

Pop tunes become infomercials in the fight against Ebola in West Africa

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Across West Africa, there's widespread suspicion about Ebola — even down to whether the disease actually exists. To help spread accurate information, radio stations are playing catchy songs with vital information about the disease.

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PRI's The World

Fear in Liberia turns violent as a mob attacks an Ebola clinic

Monday, August 18, 2014

More than a dozen Ebola patients in Liberia have gone missing after a mob attacked and looted a Monrovia-area health facility. Now, the Liberian government fears that infected individuals are returning to their communities, where they risk spreading the virus.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

What We Can Learn from the Rats of Manhattan

Thursday, August 14, 2014

A biology professor explains how trapping rats in Manhattan to analyze their DNA will help us understand how the rodents move around the city.

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PRI's The World

As the Ebola crisis rages, West African villagers are warned away from fruit bats

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Scientists are warning West African villagers to stop hunting bush meat and to stay away from fruit bats as they circle in a possible animal source for the latest Ebola outbreak. The Ebola virus lives in fruit bats, scientists believe, and is threatening communities who are already facing the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history.

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PRI's The World

The ethical debate over the use of an untested Ebola drug

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Was it right to give an experimental serum to two people infected with Ebola? Was it right to give it to white Americans and not Africans? Kevin Fitzgerald, who's a medical ethicist at Georgetown University and a Jesuit priest, discusses the circumstances.

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