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Transportation Nation

NYC Could Ban Texting While Biking

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

WNYC
Councilman Mark Treyger said the city needs to do more to prevent reckless bicycling if it really wants to get to eliminate traffic accidents.
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The Brian Lehrer Show

Cyclists, What Do You Do At Red Lights?

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

The law says stop and wait, but many local bikers adopt their own rules. So, do you stop/wait; stop/look/go; or blow through red lights?
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Transportation Nation

Stretch of 1st Avenue Repaved with New Asphalt

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

A large stretch of 1st avenue has been re-paved using asphalt the Department of Transportation says is more durable and easier to maintain. Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan says the roadway was originally paved with 18-inches of concrete 30 years ago, which was more cost-effective at the time, back in 1983.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

A Cycling City

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

What can NYC learn from Amsterdam about incorporating more cycling in its traffic flow?  Pete Jordan, author of In the City of Bikes: The Story of the Amsterdam Cyclist, relocated there and shares its bicycling history.

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Radiolab

Rocked by Doubt

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

In 2010, Lulu Miller was biking across the country, taking some time to clear her head for a new phase of life. And somewhere in Nevada, she ran into a guy named Jeff Viniard who was on a similar journey. They shared the road for two weeks, pedaling hundreds of ...

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Radiolab

Guy Pumps Out A Valentine — Literally

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Last year a guy in San Francisco jumped on a bicycle, clicked on his GPS, clicked on an app, snapped on his helmet, and 27 miles, two and a half hours and many calories later, he'd etched a Valentine message onto a street map of San Francisco. That was nice. Now, a year later, it's getting really interesting.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

NYC Traffic Deaths in Context

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Robert Kolker, contributing editor for New York Magazine, discusses his new piece on why traffic deaths are up in NYC, and how the city is trying to make intersections safer.

What do you think is NYC's most dangerous intersection, and what can be done to fix it? Call 212-433-9692 or post below!

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Features

NYC Parks: Picnics, Birdwatching and Biking in All the Five Boroughs

Wednesday, June 01, 2011

The solstice may not officially ring in summer till June 21, but that's no reason to hold off on celebrating this week's warm weather with family and friends (and a nice pair of white pants, perhaps) in one of the city's free public parks. Here's our shortlist to the best.

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Features

Where to Hit the Beach in New York City

Friday, May 27, 2011

It's time to stash the sleds and snowgear and dust off the boogie board: There's a beach in your borough in which you can lounge, slather on some sunblock and enjoy a good read. Don't forget to leave the cigarettes at home — city beaches are now smoke-free.

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Transportation Nation

Public Transportation is Good For You: Study

Thursday, May 19, 2011

(Kate Hinds, Transportation Nation) If New Yorkers took fuller advantage of the city's public transit system, bike lanes, and sidewalks, they'd be healthier. That's the message behind a report released today by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Health Benefits of Active Transportation in New York City states that "one in eight deaths annually among New Yorkers aged 30 and over could be prevented with more physical activity." While the report covers the personal health benefits of "active transportation" (defined as "self-propelled" methods like walking, bicycling, jogging, and in-line skating), it also underscores the importance of public transportation. Some highlights:

  • On average, people who walk or bike to work get more than an hour of active transportation time daily.
  • New Yorkers who walk or bike to work get more than 40 minutes more combined transportation and recreation physical activity per day than those who use a personal car or taxi.
  • New Yorkers who take public transportation for most of their commute get almost half an hour more daily combined transportation and recreation physical activity than those who use a personal car or taxi.

Thomas Farley, the commissioner of the city's Department of Health, said how you commute can make a big difference. "If you simply walk to work, run errands 20 to 30 minutes a day," he said, "you can reduce your diabetes risk by 30%, and reduce your risk of premature death by 20%."

You can read the report highlights here (pdf), or see the full report below.

Pr 009- 11 Active Transportation

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Transportation Nation

Do More Cyclists Mean Safer Streets?

Friday, February 18, 2011

(Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation)  The latest data comes from Minneapolis ' League of Bicyclists. (hat tip: Streetsblog) which shows steadily fewer bike accidents as more cyclists hit the streets.  In 1999 there were three hundred some-odd bike crashes -- a decade later, that number was 269.  During the same period, daily bike commuters jumped from 3000 to 8000.

New York's trend has been similar: city data shows a huge spike in cycling in the latter part of the last decade.  But overall bicycle crashes have not been rising, according to the New York City DOT.   Bicycle deaths did increase from 2009 to 2010 -- to 18. That's up from 12 in 2009 but down from 26 in 2008.

New York's pedestrian safety report also found that the installation of bike lanes makes those streets safer for all users, whether on foot, in a car, or on a bike.

But San Francisco is showing the opposite trend -- as Kate and Casey reported earlier this month . According to a pretty lengthy analysis by the Bay Citizen, crashes are rising faster in San Francisco than the number of cyclists.

What's going on here?  Planners &c, please weigh in!

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Transportation Nation

Study: Biking Infrastructure Creates More Jobs Than Auto-Based Road Projects

Friday, January 14, 2011

(Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation)  This study comes to us via Ray LaHood, the U.S. Transportation Secretary.  It's brief -- but by giving it the imprimatur of his blog, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood is forcing us to pay attention.

Workers install bike lane. Photo: Marianne McCune, WNYC

The Political Economy Research Institute, a University of Massachusetts, Amherst-linked public policy group, looked at 2008 data from Baltimore, and found that while road projects created about 7 jobs per million dollars spent, bike projects created 11-14 jobs per million, and pedestrian projects, 11.

The report says  this is because bicycling and pedestrian projects have a high ratio of engineers to construction workers, and that engineering jobs are both more labor intensive and have a great "multiplier" effect -- meaning each engineering job creates more demand for labor in supporting positions, like clerical jobs.

We are fascinated that LaHood is calling this to our attention, particularly at a time when road builders are giving a bit of a sneer to the Obama livability agenda.

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Beijing Opens 5 New Subway Lines, and Biking Through "Snirt"

Friday, December 31, 2010

Beijing opened five new subway lines this week; the 60 miles of new track extends from the city center to the suburbs (Reuters); video below.

In NYC, there's kvetching over whether the city plowed bike lines (Gothamist).

As frustration grows with TSA, some airports are opting out; 16 have so far, including San Francisco and Kansas City. (Washington Post)

The Chicago Transit Authority will soon unveil a train tracker website. (Chicago Tribune)

Automakers are feel optimism about 2011. (NPR)

Minnesota Public Radio has an ode to winter biking--"snirt" and all. ("I know it seems crazy, trying to pedal on streets that become more narrow with each snowfall, pushing through the beige, sand-like substance known as "snirt" (snow + ice + dirt)."

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Transportation Nation

Federal Report: Biking, Walking up, Still Tiny Percent of all trips

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

(Andrea Bernstein, Transportation Nation) Via Ray Lahood's blog, the federal highway administration today releases the "National Walking and Biking Study: ...

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Transportation Nation

Why Don't More Women Bike to Work?

Wednesday, June 09, 2010

Female biker's feet in heels

Rachel Bents, St. Paul consultant, now bikes to work after to give up her leased car a few weeks ago. (MPR Photo/Dan Olson)

(Minneapolis, MN - Dan Olson, MPR News) - The folks who organize national Bike and Walk to Work Week here are making an effort to address cycling's gender imbalance.  Surveys continue to show that more than two out of three bicyclists in this country are male.

Different cities are taking different approaches to try bring some balance to the equation.  Organizers in Minnesota are sponsoring rides specifically for women, in an effort to introduce and orient new riders on city streets.  Participants will get bright red T-shirts, urging women to wear red to show their commitment to women's health.

Still, a significant determinant in bike commuting - for women or men - is where you choose to live.  More enthusiastic bike commuters say they live where they know they can bike.  More.


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The Brian Lehrer Show

Brooklyn Bike Brouhaha

Monday, April 12, 2010

WNYC reporter Andrea Bernstein previews the NYC Department of Transportation's Prospect Park West Traffic Calming and Protected Bicycle Path open house tonight and discusses her recent interview with Brooklyn borough president Marty Markowitz.

→ Listen to Andrea Bernstein's full interview with borough president Markowitz here.

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The Takeaway

Cross-country inauguration biker arrives in Washington, D.C.

Monday, January 19, 2009

It’s said that a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. For Ryan Bowen, it began with a single thought: I’m too broke to fly from Los Angeles to D.C. for the inauguration of President-elect Barack Obama. Undeterred, Bowen decided to bike across the country. And he’s made it. The Takeaway is joined by writer and cycling activist Ryan Bowen.

Follow Ryan's journey on his video blog:

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The Takeaway

It IS about the bike: Ryan Bowen's cross-country journey to the inauguration

Monday, January 05, 2009

We're checking back in with Ryan Bowen, the writer and cycling activist who is cycling cross country from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C. for President-elect Obama's inauguration. We check in with Ryan who is camping out in Madison, Florida.

Listen to the last time Ryan was on The Takeaway.

Follow Ryan Bowen's journey on his video blog



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