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Erin McKeown: Indie Musician, Sports Fan

Friday, January 18, 2013

Erin McKeown talks about everything from digital rights management to the upcoming Superbowl -- and, we hear her perform live in our studio.

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The Takeaway

More Drug Tests for Major League Baseball

Friday, January 11, 2013

This week, the Baseball Writers of America decided that in 2013, no players would be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Potential inductees included players hailing from the infamous steroids era. Yesterday, Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig announced that the League would expand its drug testing program. Dave Zirin, sports columnist for The Nation, explores the ramifications for MLB players and the league itself.

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The Takeaway

No New MLB Hall of Famers

Thursday, January 10, 2013

Baseball Hall of Fame president Jeff Idelson announced yesterday that no players would be inducted in 2013. Notable omissions include Mark McGwire and Barry Bonds, who were included on the ballot but criticized for allegedly taking performance-enhancing drugs.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Jackie Robinson and Dr. Sterling Wade Brown Celebrate Brotherhood Week, 1968

Friday, December 14, 2012

WNYC

Jackie Robinson and Dr. Sterling Wade Brown, representing the National Conference of Christians and Jews, answer questions about the fight for civil rights in this 1968 interview. 

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WNYC News

Yanks vs. Sox, Is the Rivalry Fizzling?

Thursday, December 13, 2012

The signing of former Boston Red Sox Kevin Youkilis to the Yankees may seem just like the latest chapter in the never-ending rivalry between the two teams. But with Curse of the Bambino exorcised by the Red Sox’s World Series win in 2004, and the Sox and Yanks' dominance over their American League Eastern division waning, is the Red Sox-Yankees rivalry still red hot or just lukewarm and cooling?

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WNYC News

Former Baseball Union Head Miller Dead at 95

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Marvin Miller, the labor leader who forever changed major league baseball and  professional sports, died Tuesday in Manhattan. He was 95.

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Radiolab

Brain Fodder Vol. 5

Monday, November 19, 2012

It appears the Radiolab staff is giving thanks for a lot of videos this week, spanning the spectrum from sand to origami to baseball to dying cartoons (accompanied by folk music, of course). Intrigued? Check it...

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The Takeaway

Detroit Prepares for their 11th World Series

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

The World Series kicks off tonight, and Detroit is hoping their Tigers will do them proud. But do they have what it takes to beat the San Francisco Giants? Quinn Klinefelter, a Detroiter and reporter, from WDET weighs in.

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Transportation Nation

PHOTOS: The 1917 Nostalgia Train Rides Again -- Express to the Bronx

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

(photo by Kate Hinds)

The subway car now known as the "nostalgia special" was first rolled out in 1917. New York's MTA brings it back for special events -- like the Yankees' first home game in its best in five series against the Baltimore Orioles to determine the American League Divisional champs, being held Wednesday night in the Bronx.

(photo by Kate Hinds)

The four-car subway pulled into the 42nd Street Grand Central Terminal on the uptown #6 track. It went express to 161st Street/Yankees Stadium. 

The interior has straps for passengers to hold on -- the origin of the term "straphangers."

 


In 1917, the NYC subway fare was a nickel. Today, a $2.25 MetroCard buys passengers access to over 600 miles of subway track.


The interior still has the original ads.

Fans waiting to board (photo by Kate Hinds)


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Transportation Nation

Nine Percent of All D.C. Bike Share Bikes at Washington Nationals Stadium For Playoff Game

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

The Capitol Bikeshare "corral" at Nationals Stadium earlier today.

Playoff baseball pulls in the fans. In Washington, D.C., it's also pulling in the Capital Bikeshare bikes.

According to a rough count from the Washington D.C. Department of Transportation, about nine percent of the city's bike share bikes are Nationals Park for game three of the National League East division series, according to John Lisle, a DDOT spokesman.

"We have about 1,600 bikes in the system, and best I can count, we have somewhere in the neighborhood of 140 that are docked there [at the stadium]. Or were docked there," Lisle said. "That's a pretty good showing."

Capital Bikeshare, which is run by DDOT, has set up a staffed bike corral at the stadium for the overflow. "So if someone brings a bike there, even if the station is full, they put can put it in the corral," Lisle said. "It's a way to add capacity and it's relatively easy to do. " So there is no limit to the number of people who can come by bike share, Lisle said.

During the regular season, Capital Bikeshare clears out the docking stations before games and monitors them closely. If the docks fill up, then Capital Bikeshare "rebalances" them -- the technical term for 'takes the bikes to by van to another dock somewhere else.'

After today's game ends, staffers will keep the docks full with those corralled bikes so fans can check out a bike as usual.

But, Lisle cautions, "after the game there is no guarantee you will have a bike share bike to go home, but we are not removing any of the bikes."

So: Nats fans who chose bike to cheer on their team may want to consider checking out in the top of the ninth to ensure a two-wheeled ride home.

The bike corral will be in place at all Nationals home games during the playoffs.

The bike share corral at Nationals Park, pictured earlier with just 102 bikes. Photo: DDOT

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Steiner on Sports Memories

Friday, September 28, 2012

Brandon Steiner, founder and chairman of Steiner Sports Marketing and Memorabilia and the author of You Gotta Have Balls: How a Kid from Brooklyn Started From Scratch, Bought Yankee Stadium, and Created a Sports Empire, shares what he's learned about business in building his own sports memorabilia company. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Tony La Russa

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Tony La Russa, the third-winningest manager in baseball history, talks about his management philosophy and the 2011 Cardinals, which mounted one of the most dramatic and impressive comebacks in baseball history, making the playoffs and going on to win the World Series. In One Last Strike: Fifty Years in Baseball, Ten and a Half Games Back, and One Final Championship Season La Russa gives the inside story behind this astonishing turnaround and his career.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

“Knuckleball!"

Monday, September 24, 2012

Major League Baseball pitchers Tim Wakefield and Phil Niekro talk about being some of the few pitchers in the entire history of baseball who mastered the art of the knuckleball, a pitch so slow and unpredictable that no one trusts it. They’re joined by Ricki Stern, director of the new documentary “Knuckleball,” which follows the Major League’s only knuckleballers in 2011, Boston Red Sox Tim Wakefield and Mets pitcher R. A. Dickey. “Knuckleball!” is playing at the IFC Center.

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The Takeaway

New Movie Releases: 'Trouble with the Curve,' 'End of Watch,' 'House at the End of the Street'

Friday, September 21, 2012

Rafer Guzman and Kristen Meinzer discuss "Trouble With The Curve," a film that revives the debate presented in last year’s hit “Moneyball,” with a professional baseball scout. Which method — scouts or stats — is truly superior?

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WNYC News

With the Help of Others, Team Israel Plays Ball

Thursday, September 20, 2012

The World Baseball Classic is underway in Jupiter, Florida.  It's the third time since 2005 that the international baseball tournament has taken place. And while some countries such as the U.S. and Japan are known for their skill on the diamond, another country is also making its way through the tournament with the help of a New Yorker.

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WNYC News

Yankees Fans Frustrated With Slump

Wednesday, September 05, 2012

After a loss Tuesday night, the Yankees have let their 10-game division lead evaporate and are now sharing first place in the AL East with the Baltimore Orioles. With only 27 games left in the regular season fans are frustrated, and hoping the pinstripes will pull through.

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Operavore

Take Me Out to the Opera

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

The All-Star Game is the baseball equivalent of an opera gala, writes blogger Fred Plotkin. "The greatest practitioners of their craft gather in one place and give audiences pleasure and excitement."

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WQXR Blog

Watch: Conductors Seek Perfect Pitch on the Baseball Diamond

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Last week, the Italian conductor Riccardo Muti threw out the ceremonial first pitch at a Chicago Cubs game at Wrigley Field. Watch this slideshow of conductors' first pitches.

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Soundcheck

Scene Study: Yo La Tengo & Hoboken, NJ

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Hoboken, NJ is less than 5 miles from Manhattan -- but its main street couldn’t be more different from Wall Street. This quiet town with a population of 50,000 or so has served as the birthplace of baseball, the small-but-hardy rock venue Maxwell’s, and a long-running indie band called Yo La Tengo. We hear more when music writer Jesse Jarnow joins us with his new book, "Big Day Coming: Yo La Tengo and the Rise of Indie Rock."

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The Takeaway

Fenway Park's Troubled Racial Past

Friday, May 18, 2012

Fenway Park, the Boston Red Sox’s storied ballpark, celebrated it’s 100th birthday late last month. And in honor of the centennial, moments in Red Sox history were remembered and relived like the "Curse of the Bambino." But today, we’re talking about one element of Fenway’s history that is rarely spoken of: it’s troubled racial past.

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