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Bahrain

The Takeaway

Nicholas Kristof Reports on Police Attacking Bahrani Protesters

Friday, February 18, 2011

Nicholas Kristof of The New York Times gives a first-hand account of Bahraini police attacking protestors with tear gas and rubber bullets. The attacks have been taking place at a hospital located in the capital city Manama, which has been the site of angry clashes after police had opened fire on thousands sleeping by a traffic circle called Pearl Square.

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The Takeaway

International Business Reacts to Mid-East Protests

Friday, February 18, 2011

Bahrain’s capital city Manama is under military control as the nation tries to clamp down on the popular demonstrations that have swept across Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and elsewhere. The country's protestors may or may not be successful in building a democratic government, but one thing is for sure: civil unrest is not good for business. Just two weeks before Formula One teams are scheduled to arrive for winter testing on the Bahrain International Circuit, the 2011 Gulf Air Formula 1 Bahrain Grand Prix is in doubt. Sports are in many ways the least of the region's worries, but will bad business play a role in the unrest? 

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The Takeaway

Update from Bahrain, as Tensions Escalate

Friday, February 18, 2011

It's been a week since Hosni Mubarak stepped down as president of Egypt. Now the focus is on Bahrain as protests there heat up. New York Times reporter Patrick Farrell reports from Bahrain on what he witnessed during Friday prayers in the capital city, Manama.

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The Takeaway

Bahrain Turns Violent Over Protests

Friday, February 18, 2011

As a symbol of change in the Arab world, angry protests in Bahrain stand in stark contrast to the mostly peaceful demonstrations in Egypt that led to the ousting of President Hosni Mubarak. Reporters describe sleeping demonstrators attacked without warning while camped out in Pearl Square. The police used birdshot, rubber coated steel bullets and tear gas to tamp down the civil unrest, killing three and injuring many more. Now the military has taken over the city and called for a ban on organized gatherings, while moving tanks into Pearl Square.

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It's A Free Country ®

Bahrain 101: Putting the Unrest in Context

Thursday, February 17, 2011

I think the US is going to everything it can to keep a distance on many levels... It doesn’t want to have the image of an outside force causing the disruption in any of these countries. I really think that they are on their own.

— Steve LeVine of "The Oil and the Glory" blog at Foreign Policy on the Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Make it Bahrain

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Steve Levine who runs "The Oil and the Glory" blog at Foreign Policy, talks about the U.S. relationship with Bahrain in light of the unrest there and in the Middle East region. Plus Lauren Vriens, a Fulbright scholar studying in Bahrain calls in to update us on the situation there.

→ Read a recap and join the conversation at It's a Free Country

The Takeaway

Bahrain: View of Pearl Square

Thursday, February 17, 2011

The New York Times' Michael Slackman reports from Bahrain, where tanks are closing all arteries to the square. The military has announced that it is in possession of the square and that gatherings are banned. Right now the biggest crowd is gathered at the medical center, where the injured and dead have been taken.

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The Takeaway

Demonstrations Boil in Bahrain

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Three days after the Bahraini “Day of Rage,” Pearl Square is empty of protesters. Riot police cracked down Wednesday night, using tear gas and rubber bullets on sleeping protesters. At least three people have been killed and 300 injured. For the latest on news from that country, we turn to Michael Slackman, foreign correspondent for The New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Bahrian: Protesters Follow Egypt's Lead

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

The New York Times' Nicholas Kristof is in Bahrain, where protesters have taken over the central square in Manama. Tuesday, the police killed two protesters, but today, the protests have been peaceful. Bahrain's citizens are asking for a real consitutional monarchy. Kristof explains that the rise of the middle class in Bahrain is one of the reasons there are demands for a more democratic rule.

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The Takeaway

Update from Bahrain

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Protests continue in Bahrain, with thousands of protesters taking to the main square in Manama. Security forces are standing nearby, but have not intervened. Michael Slackman, foreign correspondent for The New York Times reports from Bahrain. He says that Bahrain's police force is one of the most brutal in the region, with two men reportedly shot in the back yesterday. However, today's protest is peaceful and demonstrators are calling for another big protest on Saturday.

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WQXR News

Protests Spread in Iran, Bahrain, and Yemen

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Demonstrations are sprouting up in the Middle East, on the heels of recent uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. Protestors are taking their message to the streets in Iran and Bahrain, among others this week.

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The Takeaway

Day 2 of Protests in Bahrain

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen and Jordan have all seen protests. Now, Bahrain is standing up, too. Two people have been killed by gunfire in the two days of protests. The largest Shiite bloc has suspended its participation in Bahrain's Parliament. The small country only has a million residents and half of them are foreign workers. The longstanding tension is between the royal family and the ruling elite, who are Sunnis and the majority of the local population, which is Shiite. Foreign correspondent for The New York Times, Michael Slackman reports from Manama, Bahrain.

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