Streams

 

Auto Industry

The Takeaway

Detroit Carmakers Beat Imports for First Time Ever on Key List

Friday, June 18, 2010

Detroit got a dose of good news, yesterday. For the first time in the 24 year history of the JD Power and Associates Initial Quality Study American car makers beat out imports. Porsche still topped the list, but Ford was in the top five up there, along with luxury brands. That is the only time a mainstream American brand has been in that group. 

Comment

The Takeaway

Does the United Autoworkers Union Still Matter?

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

At their convention today in Detroit, the United Autoworkers Union will elect a new president, ending the eight-year tenure of Ron Gettelfinger. Gettelfinger led the union through one of the most difficult periods in its history. The UAW was once one of the largest and most influential unions in the country, but these days its membership is the smallest it’s been since the end of World War II.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

One Year After Bankruptcy, GM on Right Track

Tuesday, June 01, 2010

One year ago today, General Motors filed for bankruptcy and became the fourth largest U.S. bankruptcy on record. President Obama vowed to turn GM around and make it a profitable company once again. We look at how GM has changed in the past year with the help of Rebecca Lindland, an auto analyst for IHS Global Insights, and find out how the rest of the auto industry is doing as well.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

New Fuel Efficiency Standards to Save Oil, Cut Pollution

Friday, April 02, 2010

The federal government announced its first ever mandatory limits for particular greenhouse gas emissions, as the EPA and the Department of Transportation announced new emissions rules for automobiles and light trucks yesterday.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Ford Sells Volvo to Chinese Conglomerate

Monday, March 29, 2010

Volvo is becoming a Chinese car company. Ford announced that it sold the Swedish car brand that it bought 11 years ago. Chinese conglomerate, Zhejiang Geely, is paying a third of what Ford originally paid for Volvo. Keith Bradsher, New York Times Hong Kong bureau chief, explains more about the buyer, the price and the future of Volvo.

UPDATE: On air (although not in the printed article), Bradsher said that Saab assets had been sold to Chinese car manufacturers and the rest of the company was being shut down. In fact, GM originally agreed to sell old Saab tooling to Beijing Automotive, but after starting to shut down Saab's ongoing operations, GM reversed itself and sold the company to Dutch car maker Spyker earlier this year.

Comments [2]

The Takeaway

Ford's US Sales Surge as Toyota's Drop

Wednesday, March 03, 2010

February wasn’t a bad month for everyone in the auto industry. In the midst of recalls and Congressional hearings, Toyota’s sales dropped 9 percent, while Ford's sales were up a whopping 43 percent in the same month, which makes Ford the country’s top-selling automaker. We continue our conversation about the state of the auto industry and the health of some of its major players. 

Comment

The Takeaway

Toyota's Campaign to Restore Confidence

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Over the last few weeks, Toyota has been criticized for poorly handling the media and its public relations campaign. In response, Toyota's President Akio Toyoda held a press conference in Tokyo this morning to answer questions. But is Toyota allaying consumer concerns?

Comment

The Takeaway

First Take: Illegal Immigration, Afghanistan, Dog Mania

Friday, February 12, 2010

UPDATED: Sunday, 7:00 p.m.

As usually happens over the weekend, we've shifted the show around to follow the news.  The U.S. military offensive against the Taliban in Afghanistan ramped up significantly in the south, so we'll be talking with people on the ground there about how the move is playing out. Now that Monday's in sight, we're nailing down what will feature on our weekly agenda segment, and moving our planned piece on reliable car information forward from tomorrow to Tuesday. We'll be talking about danger in sports after a luge athlete from the former Soviet republic, Georgia, died after hitting a support pole on the luge track in Vancouver.  Two doctors will be joining us to talk about the myths and realities of autism spectrum disorders, and we're asking everyone to vote on our user-submitted Takeaway Dog Show!  (It turns out that our listeners who have dogs love them dearly and take excellent photos of them.)

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

Toyota's Woes Reach a Kentucky Town

Wednesday, February 10, 2010

State Rep. Charlie Hoffman from Georgetown, Ky., is witnessing the affects of the Toyota recalls on the lives of his community, who rely on the company for jobs.

Comment

The Takeaway

Toyota's Recall Woes Continue, Prius May Be Next

Monday, February 08, 2010

Toyota's popular hybrid, the Prius, may be the next car to face a worldwide recall, according to news reports. The move comes at a perilous time for the embattled automaker, which is accused of responding too slowly to safety concerns. 

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Toyota Chief Apologizes for Brake Problems

Friday, February 05, 2010

Toyota President Akio Toyoda made his first public apology for the company's manufacturing problems, as the company announced it would further investigate possible break problems with its Lexus hybrid. New York Times business reporter Hiroko Tabuchi joins us from Japan to talk about the company's continuing problems.

Comment

The Takeaway

More Toyota Recalls Reported

Friday, February 05, 2010

Toyota officials in Japan are now saying that they are considering a recall of the 2010 Prius hybrid because of a flaw in the car’s anti-lock braking system. This flaw could affect other models as well. We find out more from New York Times Detroit bureau chief Bill Vlasic.

 

Comment

The Takeaway

How Did Toyota's Problem-Solving Methods Fail?

Thursday, February 04, 2010

Toyota’s recall of 2.3 million vehicles is sending shockwaves through the automobile industry. We look at why a company that has built its reputation on customer service and problem-solving is in so much trouble now and whether those strengths could help it get back on its feet.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Troubles Worsen for Toyota

Wednesday, February 03, 2010

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood says that Toyota's troubles may be "the most serious safety issue that we have faced" at his department. Lahood says the carmaker only initiated last week's recall after government pressure. This comes along with news of new brake problems with the Toyota's popular Prius.

Comment

The Takeaway

Takeouts: Obama in New Hampshire, Costs of Toyota Recall, Conservative Super Bowl Ads

Tuesday, February 02, 2010

  • CONGRESS TAKEOUT: Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich reports on President Obama's trip to New Hampshire — and on the continued reaction back on Capitol Hill to the president's budget.
  • AUTO TAKEOUT: We know that Toyota Motor Corporation’s recall of 6.5 million cars across eight of their product lines will cost the company at least $1 billion up front.  Advertising consultant Cindy Gallop tells us that it will end up costing the company much more to repair its damaged brand.
  • FINANCE TAKEOUT: New York Times business and finance reporter Louise Story says the lifting of a ban on Super Bowl commercials with an activist message has paved the way for a commercial from the conservative group, Focus on the Family.

Comment

The Takeaway

Takeouts: Toyota Sends Parts, Drug Violence in Mexico Continues, Henry Paulson's Memoir

Monday, February 01, 2010

  • AUTO TAKEOUT: Toyota is telling auto dealers this morning that new parts to fix unsafe gas pedals will reach them later this week. We find out more from Nick Bunkley, New York Times auto industry reporter.
  • MEXICO TAKEOUT: Over the weekend, gunmen shot 21 high school football players in Ciudad Juarez, killing 13. The Houston Chronicle's Dudley Althaus joins us from Mexico City with grim details of the escalating drug violence brewing just south of the border.
  • FINANCE TAKEOUT: Former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson is releasing his tell-all memoir of the financial collapse. New York Times business and finance reporter Louise Story details some of the book’s revelations.

Comment

The Takeaway

Ford CEO Alan Mulally on the State of the Carmaker

Wednesday, January 27, 2010

We spoke with Alan Mulally, president and CEO of Ford Motor Company, about the state of things for Ford (the only one of the "Big Three" not to take bailout money), carmakers in general, CEOs, and the nation.

Comment

The Takeaway

Automakers Announce Plans to Add Jobs

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

After one of the worst years for the auto industry, automakers may begin to hiring workers and offering more overtime, a possible sign of economic recovery. 

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

The Takeaway for Monday, December 22, 2009 (Early Edition)

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Headlines; The Toyota Backlash

Read More

Comment

The Takeaway

Toyota Struggles With Recalls, Competition

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Toyota, as recently as a year ago, looked like it could escape the economic downturn unscathed and remain the auto giant it has been for decades. But recent bad press, including announcements of multiple recalls, may be hurting the Japanese auto maker and its times of dominance may soon be over. Paul Eisenstein is the publisher of The Detroit Bureau, and believes Toyota may be in big trouble. Steven Pecha thinks differently; he says the dealership he works at, Scott Clark's Toyota City in Matthews, N.C., has been doing well and all the bad news about recalls are a thing of the past.

Comment