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Authors

On The Media

Blog to... Novel?: Five Internet Personalities Turned Fiction Writers (Besides Zoella)

Friday, December 05, 2014

Zoella's Girl Online is making a huge splash – are bloggers-cum-novelists always such a hit? (Nope.)
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Selected Shorts

Creative Writing

Friday, October 24, 2014

A husband and wife write duelling fictions.

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Selected Shorts

I Dated Jane Austen

Friday, October 24, 2014

The title says it all in TC Boyle's absurd fantasy, "I Dated Jane Austen."

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Selected Shorts

On Keeping a Notebook

Friday, October 24, 2014

Joan Didion's trade secrets.

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Selected Shorts

The Writers Model

Friday, October 24, 2014

Molly Giles' wicked story about male novelists in search of inspiration.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Writers on the Art of Writing

Friday, October 24, 2014

Molly Giles, Etgar Keret, Joan Didion and TC Boyle on the art of writing.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Extremely Creative Writing

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

A writers' model, Alex Karpovsky reads some extremely creative writing by Etgar Keret, Joan Didion tells us how she did it, TC Boyle dates Jane Austen.

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Soundcheck

Author Amy Tan; Writers Club: Women In Music; Bela Fleck And Brooklyn Rider

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

In this episode: Best-selling author Amy Tan talks about her first book in eight years, The Valley of Amazement, tells us what playing in a band with Stephen King is like, and, she plays a few favorite songs for Soundcheck's Pick Three series.

Then, this week's Writers Club: Women In Music series continues with NPR Music's Ann Powers and RookieMag music editor Jessica Hopper, who share their favorite books about women in music.

And, the borders between musical styles come crashing down as the globetrotting banjo player Bela Fleck and the adventurous string quartet Brooklyn Rider play a live set in the Soundcheck studio.

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Studio 360

American Icons: Leaves of Grass

Friday, September 27, 2013

Walt Whitman set out to invent a radically new form of poetry for a new nation. His book was first viewed as bizarre and obscene — one reviewer said that the author should be publicly flogged. But revising and adding to the book until his death, Whitman accomplished his goal, creating a new Bible for American poets.

Slideshow: The changing editions of Leaves of Grass

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Features

#AuthorsFirstTweets

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Don DeLillo joined twitter today (Update: Turns out the account probably isn't Mr. DeLillo, but let's not let that spoil our fun). @DonDeLilloOffic's second tweet is "Twitter. Fantastic!" That got us thinking: what would authors of the past post as their first tweets?

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Soundcheck

Being A 'Top Dog' On Stage

Monday, February 25, 2013

For their latest book, authors Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman took on the subject of competition -- and the science behind why some people win and others lose. We talk with the Top Dog authors about the history of competition in the arts, the science behind stage fright, and the notion that competition doesn't jibe with creativity. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Maurice Sendak

Friday, December 28, 2012

Celebrated children's book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak died in May at the age of 83. To remember him, we’re re-airing a selection of my 1992 interview with him about his book I Saw Esau, a collection of more than 170 insults, riddles, jeers, and jump-rope rhymes, edited with Iona and Peter Opie. He was known to be reclusive, and I was honored that he came to our studio for our conversation.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

The Scrappy Wunderkind of the Bronx Projects: Author Richard Price on Reader's Almanac, 1978

Thursday, December 20, 2012

WNYC

In this 1978 episode of Reader's Almanac, host Jack Sullivan interviews Richard Price, 28, on the publication of his third novel, Ladies’ Man.

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The Takeaway

Discovered Letters Inspire Readers at Troy Library

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Forty years ago, E.B. White – the author of "Charlotte’s Web," "Stuart Little", and many other beloved children’s books – wrote a letter to the children of Troy, Michigan, at the request of a librarian in Troy’s new public library. "A library is a good place to go when you feel unhappy, for there, in a book, you may find encouragement and comfort. A library is a good place to go when you feel bewildered or undecided, for there, in a book, you may have your question answered." White was just one of the famous authors and public figures who responded to librarian Marguerite Hart’s request for letters to urge the children of Troy to read.

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The Takeaway

Zora Neale Hurston's Singing Voice

Monday, November 08, 2010

Zora Neale Hurston may have been an incredible writer, but she wasn't a bad singer either. How do we know? Thanks to a team of archivists who hauled a huge "portable" disc recorder around Florida in the 1930s, we can hear Hurston singing old songs about working-class black Americans during Jim Crow segregation. 

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Studio 360

Mark Helprin

Saturday, July 23, 2005

Mark Helprin writes books with an adventurous spirit and great historical sweep. Not surprising for a guy who's held jobs as a surveyor, Israeli infantryman, and speechwriter for Bob Dole. Helprin talks to Kurt about his new book Freddy and Fredericka, a comic novel about ...

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Studio 360

John Irving Continued

Saturday, July 16, 2005

John Irving talks about church organs, the film of Cider House Rules, writers he does and doesn’t admire, and why he rewrote his new novel after he gave it to the publisher.

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Studio 360

John Irving

Saturday, July 16, 2005

John Irving talks about Captain Cook, the history of tattooing, and where to put your favorite sentence when you're writing a novel. He reads from Until I Find You, and explains how not knowing his biological father shaped his life as a writer.

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Studio 360

Special Guest: John Irving

Saturday, July 16, 2005

John Irving is the author of 11 books, including The World According to Garp and The Cider House Rules, for which he also wrote the screenplay.

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Studio 360

Wingdale Community Singers

Saturday, July 09, 2005

Three singer-songwriter-musicians for the price of one. This band-without-a-front-man is fronted by David Grubbs, Hannah Marcus, and Rick Moody — yes, that Rick Moody (author of The Ice Storm, Purple America, and other novels). They join Kurt in the studio to play a few tunes and talk about their ...

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