Streams

 

Author Interviews

Morning Edition

Bradley's 'China Mirage' Portrays A Long-Running U.S. Mistake In Asia

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep talks to author and historian James Bradley, about his his new book, The China Mirage: The Hidden History of the American Disaster in Asia.

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Fresh Air

After 20 Years On The Job, NYC Police Officer Tells His Intense Stories

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

"Your heart is pounding; your adrenaline is shooting out of your ears," Steve Osborne says. "And you got one second to get it right." He retired from the force in 2003. His memoir is called The Job.

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Morning Edition

No Demons, No Angels: Attica Locke Aims For Black Characters Who Are Human

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

In her new novel, Pleasantville, and on TV's Empire, Locke does her best to avoid simple stories. "You do some good stuff and you do some bad stuff," she says. "We exist in the middle."

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Fresh Air

'I Regret Everything': Toni Morrison Looks Back On Her Personal Life

Monday, April 20, 2015

"It's not profound regret," Morrison tells Fresh Air. "It's just a wiping up of tiny little messes that you didn't recognize as mess when they were going on." Her latest book is God Help the Child.

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All Things Considered

Unsettling Tales Of Strange Suburbia Echo Through 'The Night'

Sunday, April 19, 2015

What do Rapunzel, the Buddha and small-town America have in common? Deceptively safe spaces, says Steven Millhauser. The Pulitzer Prize winner's new short story collection is Voices in the Night.

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Memoir Chronicles The Joy And Loss Of 'The Light Of The World'

Sunday, April 19, 2015

NPR's Rachel Martin speaks to author Elizabeth Alexander about her new memoir, The Light of the World.

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'Spinster' Celebrates The Single Ladies

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Writer Kate Bolick says that, growing up, she just assumed she'd get married some day — but it hasn't happened. Her new book looks at five women who upend traditional assumptions about women's lives.

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Jon Krakauer Tells A 'Depressingly Typical' Story Of College Town Rapes

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Krakauer's Missoula looks at stories of women who have been sexually assaulted by people they know. He says rape is unlike other crimes because in other crimes, "the victim isn't assumed to be lying."

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Culinary Siblings Give Pasta A Healthy Makeover

Saturday, April 18, 2015

In a low-carb world, pasta has issues. But it's poised for a comeback, say Joseph Bastianich and Tanya Bastianich Manuali, who talk with NPR's Linda Wertheimer about their cookbook, Healthy Pasta.

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At 84, Poet Gary Snyder Lives In 'This Present Moment'

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Poet Gary Snyder has hung with the Beats, studied Buddhism, worked as a logger and he's still going strong. He talks with NPR's Linda Wertheimer about his new collection, This Present Moment.

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Morning Edition

From Horses To High-Rises: An Insider 'Unmasks' China's Economic Rise

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Over the past 25 years, former U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson watched China turn into the world's second largest economy. He explains what could halt the country's massive growth.

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Morning Edition

Revisiting The Night Abraham Lincoln Was Shot 150 Years Ago

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

On this day in 1865, John Wilkes Booth shot President Lincoln. Renee Montagne talks to author James Swanson at Ford's Theatre. (This piece initially aired on Feb. 12, 2009 on Morning Edition).

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All Things Considered

Take It From David Brooks: Career Success 'Doesn't Make You Happy'

Monday, April 13, 2015

The New York Times columnist wrote The Road to Character after seeing the gratitude for life of people who tutor immigrants. He thought, "I've achieved career success ... but I haven't achieved that."

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Fresh Air

How Young People Went Underground During The '70s 'Days Of Rage'

Monday, April 13, 2015

Bryan Burrough's new book describes the Weather Underground and other militant groups' tactics to protest the government. He interviews former radicals who had never gone on the record before.

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All Things Considered

From Harpies To Heroines: How Shakespeare's Women Evolved

Sunday, April 12, 2015

In her new book Women of Will, Tina Packer traces Shakespeare's maturation — and, she argues, the corresponding transformation of his female characters from caricatures to fully-realized humans.

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In 'Distant Marvels,' A Witness To Revolutions Tells Cuba's Story

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Chantel Acevedo's latest novel opens in 1963 and focuses on octogenarian Maria Sirena, part of a Cuban generation that lived through both the war of independence from Spain and the Cuban Revolution.

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Adventures In Vietnam — Street Food, Love And Taking Chances

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Journalist Graham Holliday moved to Vietnam in the '90s and immersed himself in the culture through food. That meant getting "a little bit" poisoned, finding the best Bún chả — and meeting his wife.

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All Things Considered

A Dark, Funny — And Vietnamese — Look At The Vietnam War

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Viet Thanh Nguyen grew up in America with war movies like Apocalypse Now and Platoon, which offer accounts of the war focusing on Americans. His new novel, The Sympathizer, follows a Vietnamese spy.

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How Jim Grimsley Shed His 'Racist' Skin

Saturday, April 11, 2015

In 1966, Jim Grimsley's North Carolina school was integrated. NPR's Tamara Keith talks to Grimsley and one of his first black classmates, Donnie Meadows, about Grimsley's book, How I Shed My Skin.

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'Born With Teeth,' Actress Kate Mulgrew On A Life Lived With Abandon

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Mulgrew played Captain Janeway on Star Trek: Voyager and is a formidable kitchen manager on Orange Is the New Black. But her personal story is more dramatic than any she's ever played on screen.

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