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Astronomy

The Takeaway

Carl Sagan, Neil deGrasse Tyson and Mentors in Science

Monday, March 10, 2014

As a high school senior, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson boarded a bus from New York City to Ithaca, to meet his idol, Carl Sagan. The meeting had a profound impact on Tyson, host of the new "Cosmos" series. Three scientists reflect on "Cosmos" and the mentors that influenced their careers.

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The Takeaway

Ann Druyan, Wife of the Late Carl Sagan, Reflects on 'Cosmos,' Now and Then

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

The original "Cosmos" aired in 1980 on PBS, and in just 13 episodes, astrophysicist Carl Sagan captured the hearts and minds of a generation. On Sunday, more than 30 years after the original series began, "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey" will premiere. Hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson, the new series pays direct homage to Sagan's original vision, in part because the original and the re-boot share an executive producer in Ann Druyan, wife of the late Carl Sagan. Today Druyan discusses the series and her life with Sagan.

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The Takeaway

Scientists Bewildered by Strange Sun Activity

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Every 11 years the sun switches it's magnetic poles in the culmination of it's solar cycle. We are quickly approaching this planetary event, but scientists are curious about some unusual behavior this time around. Some of the sun's activity, including the intensity of it's sunspots and the placement of it's magnetic field, are behaving in ways not seen for over a century. The Takeaway is joined by Todd Hoeksema, director of the Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford University, who explains more about this interesting event.

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On Being

Natalie Batalha — Exoplanets and Love: Science That Connects Us to One Another [remix]

Thursday, August 29, 2013

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On Being

[Unedited] Natalie Batalha with Krista Tippett

Thursday, August 29, 2013

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The Takeaway

Your Next Vacation: Outer Space?

Friday, July 19, 2013

Takeaway Host John Hockenberry visited the American Physical Society's newest production—but it's not what you would expect. The Intergalactic Travel Bureau looks like any other travel agency. But the destinations at this travel agency are different than what you might be used to. Instead of beach resorts and ancient cities, there are astrophysicists acting as travel agents who advise guests on which would be a better vacation—the far off rings of Saturn or the nearby moon. On today's show, we look at the different aspects of space tourism.

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The Takeaway

Neil deGrasse Tyson on Russian Meteor

Friday, February 15, 2013

A meteor streaked across the sky in Russia today, reportedly causing hundreds of injuries. The meteor, which was captured on video, came as many were focused on another space object, 2012 DA14, which will fly within a few thousand miles of Earth today. Neil deGrasse Tyson is the director of the Hayden Planetarium and host of Star Talk Radio.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Neil Shubin on the Universe Within

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Science writer Neil Shubin discusses a scientific mystery as big as the world itself: How are the events that formed our solar system billions of years ago embedded inside each of us? In The Universe Within, Shubin explains how fossils, the Earth’s position, and the universe’s fourteen-billion-year history can be seen in the human body.

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WNYC News

Orionid Meteor Shower Promises Pretty Show

Friday, October 19, 2012

The peak of the Orionid meteor shower promises a dazzling Saturday night display of dusty ice and rock fragments as the earth passes through the trail of Comet Halley, but those hoping to see it will have to stay up late—or get up early. 

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WNYC News

Blue Moon Over Manhattan Friday Won't Actually Be Blue

Friday, August 31, 2012

On Friday night, a full moon – the second of the month – will light up the night sky.

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The Takeaway

When a Star Dies, Does It Make a Noise?

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Ever wonder what the sound of a star being shredded by a black hole might sound like? A professor of astronomy at the University of Michigan explains how the light of a dying star can provide us with the frequency to imagine its sound.

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Radiolab

REBROADCAST: Space

Monday, August 20, 2012

Celebrate the 35th anniversary of the launch of Voyager 2 (it rocketed off Earth on 8/20/77 carrying a copy of the Golden Record), and tip your hat to the Mars rover Curiosity as it kicks off its third week on the red planet, with a rebroadcast of one our favorite episodes: Space.

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Radiolab

Deluxe Meteor Shower

Thursday, August 09, 2012

The yearly Perseid meteor shower peaked this past weekend (8/11-8/12), but you may still catch some shooting star sightings through 8/22. Lulu Miller gives us a quick bit of background on the Perseids, and makes a case for getting outside for some stargazing.

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The Takeaway

NASA's Rover Lands on Mars

Monday, August 06, 2012

In the most anticipated rover landing in a generation, NASA landed its Mars Curiosity Rover on Mars at 1:31 am EST this morning. Curiosity will remain on Mars for two years, trying to find a signs that the planet can support life.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: Great Expectations

Sunday, June 10, 2012

We have three stories to offer on this program that center around the theme of parental expectations, two by outstanding American short story writers, and one by a leading figure in the new generation of Israeli writers.

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WNYC News

Watch Live | Venus's Once in a Lifetime Trip

Tuesday, June 05, 2012

Weather permitting, people in North America will get to witness a rare astronomical event: the transit of Venus. Over the course of several hours, Venus will pass between the Earth and the Sun. It’s not expected to happen again for 105 years. Watch a Live Stream of the transit.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Neil deGrasse Tyson on NASA and Space

Monday, March 05, 2012

Neil deGrasse Tyson discusses NASA and the future of space travel, now that NASA has put human space flight on hold. In Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier , he shares his thoughts on topics from the missteps that shaped the recent history of space travel to how aliens, if they existed, might go about finding us.

 

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The Takeaway

UC Berkeley Astrophysicist on Black Hole Discovery

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

Astronomers from the University of California, Berkeley announced that they had discovered the two most massive black holes to date. Their findings situate the black holes at between 10 and 21 billion times the mass of the sun. They are being published in journal Nature. Theoretical astrophysicist Chung-Pei Ma led the team that made these discoveries, and she joins The Takeaway to discuss what this all means.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How Copernicus Revolutionized the Cosmos

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Dava Sobel tells how the 16th-century discoveries of Nicolaus Copernicus changed the world. More Perfect Heaven: How Copernicus Revolutionized the Cosmos tells how a young German mathematician had Copernicus's manuscript On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres published, in 1543 and explains how the book forever changed humankind's place in the universe.

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On Being

Guy Consolmagno and George Coyne — Asteroids, Stars, and the Love of God [remix]

Thursday, March 10, 2011

Four Jesuits in history have had asteroids named after them. Our guests are the two living astronomers with that distinction. Brother Guy Consolmagno and Father George Coyne study the composition of meteorites and the life and death of stars. They share t

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