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The Leonard Lopate Show

Crafting with Amy Sedaris

Thursday, November 04, 2010

Amy Sedaris, America's most delightfully unconventional hostess, talks about the joys of crafting. Her new book Simple Times: Crafts for Poor People shows that crafting is pleasurable and constructive. It includes instructions for popular crafts and gifts: crab-claw clips, tinfoil balls, and crepe-paper moccasins, hints for getting inspired, and includes recipes for cooking your own edible crafts. She’ll also launch a listener craft contest!

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The Takeaway

What's Your Worst Nightmare?

Thursday, November 04, 2010

People are passing out in movie theaters after seeing Danny Boyle's new film, "127 Hours," and it's not even out yet. James Franco stars as the man forced to sever his own arm after he gets trapped under a rock while hiking, a worst nightmare come true.

We're asking people for their idea of "worst nightmare." What situation scares you the most? Could be as serious as getting trapped or as mundane getting stuck with someone you can't stand.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Marlo Thomas Tells the Story of Funny

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

Marlo Thomas talks about the art of comedy and what she learned growing up with her father, TV and nightclub star Danny Thomas. Her memoir, Growing Up Laughing: My Story and the Story of Funny, she tells stories from her Beverly Hills childhood, her groundbreaking creation of That Girl and Free to Be . . . You and Me, and her marriage to talk-show king Phil Donahue. She also tells the story of comedy, exploring the comic roots of today's most celebrated comedians.

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The Takeaway

Phil Collins 'Goes Back'

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

In addition to being the former frontman and drummer of the legendary band Genesis, Phil Collins has had one of the most coveted solo careers in the music industry — with record sales surpassing 150 million, and numerous awards under his belt, including an Oscar, seven Grammys, and two Golden Globes. His newest album is a collection of remakes called “Going Back.” John talks with Phil Collins about his inspiration for the album and his career with Genesis.

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The Takeaway

Brian Leung on Chinese Americans in the Wild West

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

When we look back on the wild west of American history, we frequently celebrate cowboys and Indians, wild buffalo and wide open country. But what we often leave out are the thousands of Chinese-Americans who worked on the Union Pacific railroad, lived in the many coal-mining towns, and struggled against the prejudices of their white neighbors and employers.

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The Takeaway

Sheryl Crow on Politics, Pop and Memphis

Monday, October 11, 2010

Sheryl Crow has been singing and writing for over twenty years; in that time, she’s won nine Grammys and performed some of the biggest hits of the past two decades – including “Leaving Las Vegas,” “Everyday is a Winding Road,” “My Favorite Mistake,” and “Soak Up The Sun.” Her new album is called “100 Miles from Memphis.”  

Crow joins us in-studio to talk about her new semi-autobiographical album, and the occasionally fine line between pop and politics.

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The Takeaway

Pianist Henry Butler Jazzes Up Your Day

Friday, September 24, 2010

Renowned jazz pianist Henry Butler stops by KUVO in Denver, where Celeste is visiting today, to entertain us with a little morning music.

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The Takeaway

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps ... or Does It?

Friday, September 24, 2010

Today, one of the greatest screen villains of the past quarter century returns in “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.”

This time, Gordon Gekko, again played by Michael Douglas, returns to the investment banking world just in time to see it crash and burn ... and of course, in time to benefit from it crashing and burning.

But while some fans of Gekko and "Wall Street" are thrilled with the prospect of a sequel, we’re more interested in knowing whether the movie is good, the facts accurate, and what we might learn from it.

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The Takeaway

Poetry and Rebellion with the Directors of 'Howl'

Friday, September 24, 2010

55 years ago, Allen Ginsberg wrote his beat generation poetic masterpiece, "Howl." Almost immediately after its publication in 1956, the poem's publisher, Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books, was arrested and charged with obscenity. In a landmark legal case, a judge ruled in 1957 that the poem was not obscene.

A new movie, "Howl," starring James Franco, John Hamm, and Mary Louise Parker, follows the story of the poem and the man who wrote it.

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The Takeaway

Inside the Strange, Magical World of Roald Dahl

Thursday, September 23, 2010

If you were a child anytime in the past fifty years, you’re likely familiar with the strange, wonderful worlds of Roald Dahl.

His children’s books – which include classics like “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” “James and the Giant Peach,” “The Witches” and “Fantastic Mr. Fox” – have been translated into dozens of languages and turned into hugely popular films.

But he also wrote some of the creepiest stories out there for adults, including “Lamb to the Slaughter,” in which a woman kills her husband with a frozen lamb chop, then cooks and feeds it to the detectives who come to investigate, and “the Smoker” – which follows a man’s attempts to claim the fingers from people’s hands through wagers.

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The Takeaway

Julianne Moore on Movies and Multitasking

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Julianne Moore is one of the most accomplished actors of our day. She’s appeared in dozens of critically acclaimed films—including "The Hours," "Boogie Nights," "A Single Man," and "The Kids are All Right." She’s been nominated for four Oscars. She’s won a Golden Globe.

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The Takeaway

Castles Made of Sand: Remembering Jimi Hendrix

Friday, September 17, 2010

40 years since the death of Jimi Hendrix. It’s really astounding to imagine that he’s been gone that long. It’s not surprising that Hendrix’s music lives on. Hendrix created the whole Fender Stratocaster power chord distortion mystique for the electric guitar. He made magic. He mesmerized audiences. He died young. His narrative is the allegory of the mid 20th century where a curtain came down hard on a show that seemed to be just getting started.

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The Takeaway

Katherine Schwarzenegger Tells Girls How to 'Rock What They've Got'

Friday, September 17, 2010

Katherine Schwarzenegger descends from Kennedy bloodlines and Hollywood royalty. She’s educated and beautiful and has been afforded more privileges than most of us could ever hope for. But she also wants the world to know she’s a real person - a person who, not that long ago, was a young girl facing the same pressures that young girls everywhere in America face.

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The Takeaway

Philip Seymour Hoffman on Acting and Directing

Friday, September 17, 2010

He's most known for his acting roles in "Boogie Nights", "Happiness" and "Capote". But in this memorable 2010 interview, the Academy Award winning actor, who died Sunday in his Greenwich Village home, talks about trying out an altogether different role: film director.

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The Takeaway

The Economy in Haiku

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

What if you could explain economics and finance in the form of a poem? Jess Walter writes about exactly that in “The Financial Lives of the Poets," a novel that centers on a journalist who gives up newspaper work to offer online financial advice in free verse. The book comes out in paperback this month, just in time for the two-year anniversary of the financial crash that led to the current economic recession.

Jess tells us about the economy, poetry, and whether there's anything that's too awful to smile about or turn into a haiku.

Meanwhile, we're asking you: Send us your haikus about the economy. It can be anything about the recession, the recovery, the stimulus, your personal situation or the president's policies. Just remember the 5-7-5 form: five syllables, then seven syllables, then five syllables. We'll read the best ones on the air with Jess.

Text us yours to 69866 with the word TAKE, or call it in to 877-8-MY-TAKE.

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The Takeaway

The Many Roles of Martin Landau

Monday, September 13, 2010

Some people know Martin Landau as the debonair master of disguise in TV history — from his role on “Mission Impossible.” Some remember him best as the groundbreaking, sexually ambiguous henchman in “North By Northwest.” However, most people remember him fondly as Bella Lugosi in “Ed Wood” — a role that garnered him an Academy Award.

But the magic of Martin Landau is that, to a certain extent, many of us don’t remember him at all. Rather, we remember the characters he plays – each with his own unique desires, language, and history. Landau virtually disappears into each one.

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The Takeaway

Exploded Car from Baghdad Goes on Display in London Exhibition

Friday, September 10, 2010

A car salvaged from a 2007 bombing in Baghdad that killed 38 people has gone on display at the Imperial War Museum in London. The destroyed car was donated by artist Jeremy Deller, after he brought it on tour across America. We ask the head of collections at the museum about putting the mangled metal on display as art.

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The Takeaway

When I First Met Spock

Friday, September 03, 2010

Back in high school when I was utterly clueless about what I might do for a living I thought about being an actor. I had done numerous plays in the local community theatre in Western Michigan, where I went to high school. I was the lead in our high school musical. I played a Greek guy, Zorba the Greek, in fact, in the Kander and Ebb show, "Zorba." The opening song from that show was “Life is…” The first line, “Life is what you do while you’re waiting to die,” is a compelling, if questionable concept for a kid in high school thinking about what he might do when he grows up.

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The Takeaway

For the Love of Clooney

Friday, September 03, 2010

The newest George Clooney vehicle, "The American," opened nationwide on Wednesday, and critics expect huge audiences in the coming days. Clooney plays an assassin, holed up in Italy for one last assignment. Given the film's star, one can expect intrigue and romance along the way, but does the newest Clooney film really show Clooney at his best? And what, exactly, is Clooney at his best?  

We look back at Clooney’s films with two people who know his work well, and we’re asking, what's the best version of Clooney, and what makes Clooney's appeal is so broad?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"Rubicon"

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

Peabody Award winner Henry Bromell, the executive producer of the AMC drama "Rubicon," discusses the new series: a conspiracy thriller about a group of clandestine code-crackers working in lower Manhattan.

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