Streams

 

Arts And Design

The Leonard Lopate Show

Garry Winogrand Retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum

Friday, July 18, 2014

The renowned photographer captured life in New York City and American life from the 1950s through the early 1980s.

Comment

Campus Press Conference

Building an Eco-Friendly Mushroom Tower at MoMA PS1

Friday, July 18, 2014

Hy-Fi is a cylindrical tower built out of bricks made from cornstalks and the root-like structures of mushrooms. The project is this year’s winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

“Out Of Hand" at the Museum of Arts and Design

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Ronald T. Labaco, curator at the Museum of Arts and Design, and artists Richard Dupont and Barry X Ball, discuss the exhibition Out Of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital,” which features interactive installations and digitally fabricated works of art. It’s on view at the Museum of Arts and Design  through June 1.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Sandy and the New York Arts Community

Monday, October 28, 2013

A year after Sandy, many parts of the New York arts community are still struggling to get back on their feet. Glass artist Renee Radenberg, lost her home and art studio in the storm surge. Zach Feuer is the owner of Zach Feuer Gallery, which lost roughly 700 pieces of art. Kevin Cunningham is artistic director of 3-Legged Dog Media and Theater Group, which suffered severe water damage.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Talking Trash; "Punk: Chaos to Couture"; "Love's Labour's Lost"; Please Explain

Friday, August 09, 2013

New York City generates an average of 11,000 tons of household trash each day, and on today’s show an anthropologist and three sanitation workers explain how the Dept. of Sanitation handles all of that waste. Andrew Bolton, curator of the Metropolitan Museum’s Costume Institute, talks about the exhibition “Punk: Chaos to Couture.” Rachel Dratch and composer Michael Friedman tell us about Shakespeare in the Park’s production of “Love’s Labour’s Lost.” Plus, this week’s Please Explain is about in vitro fertilization.

The Leonard Lopate Show

“Punk: Chaos to Couture” at the Metropolitan Museum

Friday, August 09, 2013

Andrew Bolton, curator in the Metropolitan Museum’s Costume Institute, talks about the exhibition “Punk: Chaos to Couture,” on view at the Metropolitan through August 14. The show examines punk’s impact on high fashion from the movement’s birth in the 1970s through its continuing influence today.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Bronfman Haggadah

Monday, March 25, 2013

Philanthropist and Jewish leader Edgar Bronfman and illustrator Jan Aronson talk to Leonard Lopate about The Bronfman Haggadah, their new illustrated contemporary Haggadah for the Passover Seder.

Comments [15]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Workrooms and World of Balenciaga

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Mary Blume looks at the life and work of fashion designer Cristóbal Balenciaga, one of the most innovative and admired figures in the history of haute couture. In The Master of Us All: Balenciaga, His Workrooms, His World, Blume tells the story of the man and his house through the eyes of the woman who knew him best, Florette Chelot, his adviser and saleswoman who worked with him for over 30 years.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Dead Sea Scrolls

Friday, December 16, 2011

Curator Risa Levitt Kohn talks about “Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times,” on view at Discovery Times Square. The exhibition features the most comprehensive collection of ancient artifacts from Israel ever organized, including one of the largest collections of the 2,000-year-old Dead Sea Scrolls displayed in North America, along with an actual three-ton stone from Jerusalem's Western Wall. It also includes the Ten Commandments Scroll, which will be on display for two weeks in December. The exhibition is on view at Discovery Times Square through April 15, 2012.

Comments [12]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Peter Sis on The Conference of the Birds

Thursday, November 03, 2011

Celebrated children's book author and illustrator Peter Sis talks about creating his first book for adults, an adaptation of the classic 12th-century Sufi epic poem, The Conference of the Birds. His adaptation tells the story of an epic flight of birds in search of the true king, Simorgh.

Original artwork from Peter Sis’s The Conference of the Birds is on exhibit (and for sale) at Mary Ryan Gallery, 527 West 26th Street.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The King James Bible Turns 400

Friday, October 07, 2011

Liana Lupas and Tricia Pongracz, curators at the Museum of Biblical Art, tell us about the exhibition “On Eagles’ Wings: The King James Bible Turns 400” at the Museum of Biblical Art. The exhibition presents touchstones of the translation process, examining how this work was and continues to be inspirational. It also features a series of paintings commissioned from Makoto Fujimura, a contemporary artist working in New York City.  "On Eagles' Wings" is on view at MoBiA through October 16.

Comments [17]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Friday, September 30, 2011

Joseph Gordon-Levitt talks about his acting career and his new movie "50/50," about a young man whose life changes when he's diagnosed with cancer. The screenplay was written by Will Reiser, based on his own experiences, and stars Seth Rogen as the best friend. He also discusses hitRECord, a collaborative production company he started about five years ago. The first anthology of work, RECollection, features short films and videos, original songs, stories, poems, illustrations, photography.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

All About Fonts

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Simon Garfield talks about the history of fonts, from font "pirating" dating back nearly as far as Gutenberg to the creation of Comic Sans and Ikea’s font-change controversy. Just My Type: A Book About Fonts shows how something as simple as font choice can speak volumes about our cultural climate and personal tastes.

Comments [23]

The Leonard Lopate Show

More on Typography

Thursday, August 04, 2011

Every seasoned New Yorker and every tourist riding on the subway for the first time knows how important clear signage is to help riders find their way to the right train heading the right direction. On today’s show graphic designer and typographer Paul Shaw explains how the typeface Helvetica was used to impose order over the chaos of the subway signage. Listen to that interview here.

Here’s a review of Paul Shaw’s book in The New Yorker’s The Book Bench blog.

History of Helvetica
The typeface Helvetica was developed by Max Miedinger with Edüard Hoffmann in 1957 for the Haas Type Foundry in Münchenstein, Switzerland. Helvetica’s name is derived from the Latin name for Switzerlant, Helvetia. In 1961 Linotype started marketing the font internationally. Swiss design and sleek, sans serif typefaces were popular at the time, and because Helvetica is a scalable font that can be resized without distorting its proportions, it soon appeared in corporate logos and on transportation signage—In 1966 Vignelli Associates designed the New York Subway sign system using Helvetica (more about that here). When Apple included Helvetica on Macintosh computers in 1984, the font became even more common and is now one of the most popular typefaces of all time.  

There’s also a documentary about Helvetica, directed by Gary Hustwit. Find out more about “Helvetica” the film, and download the film here.

More on Typography
We did a Please Explain on typography in 2009, and typographer Jonathan Hoefler, type designer and president of Hoefler & Frere-Jones and Steven Heller, co-chair of the MFA Designer as Author program at the School of Visual Arts, explained how typefaces are designed, trademarked, and the ways type faces can communicate with just their shape. Listen to that interview here.

Read More

Comment