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The Leonard Lopate Show

Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Comic book artist Joann Sfar discusses directing his first feature film, “Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life.” He interprets the life of 1960s singer-songwriter Serge Gainsbourg (né Lucien Ginsburg to Russian-Jewish parents), beginning with his childhood years in Nazi-occupied Paris, then depicts his early years as a painter and jazz musician, and his life as a wildly popular performer, notorious bon vivant, and lover of some of the world's most glamorous women. “Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life” opens August 31 at Film Forum.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Tyne Daly on “Master Class”

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Tony and Emmy Award winner Tyne Daly talks about starring in Manhattan Theatre Club’s new Broadway production of Terrence McNally’s “Master Class.” The play takes us to one of Maria Callas’ famous master classes, where, late in her own career, she dares the next generation to make the same sacrifices and rise to the same heights that made her the most celebrated and the most controversial singer of her time. “Master Class” is playing at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, 261 West 47th Street, through September 4.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ollabelle Performs Live

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

Amy Helm, Fiona McBain, Tony Leone, Byron Isaacs, Glenn Patscha, of the band Ollabelle will be performing live and talking about the band’s first album in five years, “Neon Blue Bird.” The Washington Post called Ollabelle "one of the hottest bands going in roots music."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"St. Francis in the Desert" at the Frick

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

Curator Susannah Rutherglen discusses Giovanni Bellini’s painting “St. Francis in the Desert,” a hallmark of the Frick Collection and one of the most important Italian Renaissance paintings in America. She’ll explain how X-radiography, infrared relectography, paint analysis, and surface examination have addressed questions about the painting’s subject, creation, and later alterations. In a “New Light: Bellini’s St. Francis in the Desert” is on view at the Frick Collection through August 28.

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The Takeaway

Peter Parker to Miles Morales: A New Spider-Man Is Born

Thursday, August 04, 2011

Everybody was talking about Spider-Man this week. But it wasn't the dangers of the Broadway show, or the latest actor to be playing Spidey on the silver screen. Most conversation revolved around the comic book itself, and the death of longtime character Peter Parker in the Ultimate Spider-Man series from Marvel. He's been replaced with a new protagonist: a half-Latino, half-African-American teenager named Miles Morales. We had two expert guests on the show to talk about their perspectives: Vice Magazine's Nicholas Gazin, and Marvel editor-in-chief Axel Alonso. See how our coverage of the new Spider-Man character developed, what listeners and guests had to say. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Terence Blanchard

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Grammy Award-winning jazz trumpeter Terence Blanchard talks about his career as a musician and film score composer, and his performances with the Terence Blanchard Quintet at Birdland August 2-6. He has more than 29 albums and multiple Grammy Awards and nominations to his credit as a musician, and he’s composed the scores for Spike Lee’s films, from “Do the Right Thing” to “Malcolm X” and “Inside Man” to “When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts.”

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The Leonard Lopate Show

New York Public Library Celebrating 100 Years

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Elaine Charnov, director of education, programming and exhibitions at the New York Public Library, talks about the exhibition “Celebrating 100 Years,” which includes artifacts belonging to literary giants such as William Shakespeare, Charlotte Brontë, and Jorge Luis Borges along with historically important items from the Age of Discovery to the creation of the Soviet Union, World War II, the Civil Rights movement, and the AIDS crisis. The exhibition is organized into four thematic sections: Observation, Contemplation, Society, and Creativity, and is on view through December 31.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Los Angeles Art Scene and the 1960s

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hunter Drohojowska-Philp describes the art scene in 1960s Los Angeles and looks at the artists—among them Ed Ruscha, David Hockney, Robert Irwin, Bruce Nauman, Judy Chicago and John Baldessari—who rose to international prominence. Rebels in Paradise: The Los Angeles Art Scene and the 1960s tells how the scene came into being and why a prevailing Los Angeles permissiveness and 1960s-style spawned countless innovations and was the epicenter of cool.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Measure for Measure

Friday, July 22, 2011

Danai Gurira, who plays Isabella, and Reg Rogers, who plays Lucio in “Measure for Measure” (and Parolles in “All’s Well That Ends Well”) discuss the production of “Measure for Measure,” part of this summer’s Shakespeare in the Park. “Measure for Measure” in repertory with “All’s Well That Ends Well” at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park through July 30.

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The Takeaway

App Assignment: What Are You Reading and Where Are You Reading It?

Friday, July 15, 2011

Eugene O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh" at The Dutch Tavern? "Hey Ho Let's Go: The Ramones" on Rockaway Beach? As we enter the hottest, laziest days of summer, The Takeaway wants to know what you're reading and where you're reading it — no matter what it is and where you are. It's part of our summer book club series.  

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Invention of Modern Horror Movies

Monday, July 11, 2011

Jason Zinoman gives an account of the gifted and eccentric directors who ushered in the golden age of modern horror films in the 1970s. Shock Value: How a Few Eccentric Outsiders Gave Us Nightmares, Conquered Hollywood, and Invented Modern Horror tells how the much-disparaged horror film became an ambitious art form and box office draw. Directors such as Wes Craven, Roman Polanski, John Carpenter, and Brian De Palma—brought a gritty aesthetic, confrontational style, and political edge to horror with such classics as “Rosemary's Baby,” “Carrie,” “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre,” and “Halloween.”

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hong Kong Filmmaker Tsui Hark

Monday, July 11, 2011

Hong Kong filmmaker Tsui Hark talks about his career and his mega-hit films “Detective Dee and the Mystery of the Phantom Flame” and “The Blade.” He’s being presented with the 2011 Star Asia Lifetime Achievement Award at the New York Asian Film Festival, which takes place July 1-14.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Sleep No More

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

Felix Barrett and Maxine Doyle, from the British troupe Punchdrunk, discuss creating the interpretive, interactive theater piece “Sleep No More.” Over 100 rooms are on display in a renovated space in New York’s Chelsea gallery district, and accompanied by an eerie soundtrack, masked audience members walk at through the rooms, where performers re-enact scenes from Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.”

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The Leonard Lopate Show

John Larroquette on “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”

Thursday, June 30, 2011

John Larroquette, who just won a Tony Award for his performance in “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying,” talks about his role in the new Broadway production of the musical. It’s playing at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Nom de Plume

Friday, June 24, 2011

Carmela Ciuraru tells the fascinating stories behind more than a dozen pseudonyms across centuries and cultures. She looks at the creative process and the darker, sometimes crippling aspects of fame. Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms is part detective story, part exposé, part literary history, and a psychological meditation on identity and creativity. Ciuraru looks at the people behind the pen names of Lewis Carroll, the Brontë sisters, George Sand, and others.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Little Journey

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Samantha Soule and Laurie Birmingham talk about their roles in Rachel Crothers' Pulitzer Prize-nominated comedy, “A Little Journey.” Set on a westbound train leaving New York City, the play transports us to another world. A proud but heartsick young woman feels like she’s come to the end of the line until she realizes that a second chance for happiness is just across the aisle. It’s playing at the Mint Theater Company.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

All’s Well That Ends Well at Shakepeare in the Park

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Daniel Sullivan, director of “All’s Well That Ends Well,” one of the two plays that’s in repertory at Shakespeare in the Park this summer, and John Cullum, who plays the King of France, talk about the production, the challenges and rewards of performing in the park in the summer, and the enduring popularity of Shakespeare. “All’s Well That Ends Well” is running June 6 through July 30 at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Eilen Jewell, Queen of the Minor Key

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Eilen Jewell and her band performs songs from her new album “Queen of the Minor Key.” Her songs are dark and sometimes haunted,  and the album includes surf guitar, pedal steel and upright bass. “Queen of the Minor Key” will be released June 28.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jaimy Gordon on Her Novel, Lord of Misrule

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Jaimy Gordon discusses her novel, Lord of Misrule, which was the recipient of the 2011 National Book Award. It’s set in the ruthless and often violent world of cheap horse racing, where trainers, jockeys, grooms, hotwalkers, loan sharks and touts all struggle to take an edge, prove their luck, or just survive. It follows five characters throughout a year and four races at Indian Mound Downs, downriver from Wheeling, West Virginia.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Royal Danish Ballet

Monday, June 13, 2011

Nikolaj Hubbe, artistic director of the Royal Danish Ballet, and principal dancers Alban Lendorf and Amy Watson talk about the company and its first performances in New York since 1988. Founded in 1748, the Royal Danish Ballet is the world’s third oldest ballet company, but it does not live in the past—it performs dances from the neoclassical works by George Balanchine to Danish choreographers to contemporary choreographers such as John Neumeier, Maurice Béjart and Jiri Kylián. The Royal Danish Ballet will present six evenings of its work June 14-19 at David H. Koch Theater.

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