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The Leonard Lopate Show

Andrea Marcovicci on Her 25 Years in the Oak Room

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Singer Andrea Marcovicci discusses her 25th year performing at the Oak Room at the Algonquin. Only the late Bobby Short, who held court at the Cafe Carlyle for over 35 years, had a longer standing engagement in a single venue. Her shows weave together the life stories and memorable songs of golden age performers like Fred Astaire, Mabel Mercer and Ruth Etting in addition to songwriters like Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern and Frank Loesser. Her new show “No Strings” runs through December 30.

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The Takeaway

Listener Responses: Lowe's and 'All-American Muslim'

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

On Monday, The Takeaway reported on the home improvement store Lowe's pulling its advertising from the TLC reality show "All-American Muslim" after a conservative Florida lobbying group launched a campaign against the show. Takeaway listeners have a lot to say about this incident and what it means for religion in America.

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The Takeaway

Ten Years of Art Basel Miami

Thursday, December 01, 2011

Its reputation for parties, beaches, and condos was cemented by the eponymous Will Smith rap in 1997. Prior to that, it was best known as a haven for cocaine and pastel suit-wearing cops. But for the past ten years, Art Basel Miami has brought a cavalcade of new, fierce artistic talent — curators, critics, gallery owners, and creatives working in all types of media — to an international audience.

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The Takeaway

Ioan Grillo on Mexico's Violent Drug Industry

Monday, November 28, 2011

Since 2006, when President Felipe Calderón declared war on Mexico's drug cartels, 45,000 Mexicans across the republic have been disappeared, murdered, or mass-executed. Victims of this violence include journalists, over two thousand public officials, and bystanders. While drug-related activity was previously relegated to only a few Mexican states, the dramatic spread of violence — and its severity — is attributable to governmental policy north and south of the border.

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The Takeaway

Giving Thanks for Good Friends and Worthwhile Journeys

Thursday, November 24, 2011

We have a lot to be grateful for this Thanksgiving here at the Takeaway, including loyal listeners and unexpected guests. Among them, a team of five people who helped us see the world through different eyes: Larry Bissonnette, Tracy Thresher, their assistants Pascal Cheng and Harvey Lavoy, and film director Gerry Wurzburg. They talked with us about their documentary, "Wretches and Jabberers."

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The Takeaway

The Takeaway's Halloween Playlist

Friday, October 28, 2011

It could be a tense orchestral crash of instruments ("Thus Sprach Zarathustra"), or held in just a few feverish notes on a piano ("Halloween"). Whatever it is, the music from movies we think of as spooky plays a big part in raising those hairs on our neck and getting us to reach out for a (hopefully live) hand to hold. John Schaefer, host of New York Public Radio’s "Soundcheck" joins us with a playlist of some of the scariest music ever recorded.

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The Takeaway

The Creative Class: How Detroit and Berlin Have Drawn Revitalizing Artists

Saturday, October 08, 2011

Detroit and Berlin both know something about abandoned buildings. After the fall of the wall when the former east opened up, parts of Berlin looked a lot like Detroit today, where scores of buildings stood unclaimed, their purpose unclear. While officials worked on a city’s future, Germans like Dimitri Hegemann, relished in exploring the relics of Berlin’s industrial past. 

"We were very curious...so when I could go in… I was curious like a young boy," he says. "What is this building? Oh, it’s empty? Let’s look inside. And this happened 1,000 times. We just invaded. This was, you must understand, the frame of these days. The atmosphere was burning. It was an amazing situation." 

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The Takeaway

Unpaid Interns Sue 'Black Swan' Production Company

Friday, September 30, 2011

Two men are suing Fox Searchlight, saying the company violated minimum wage and overtime laws when they employed the two as interns on the Academy Award-winning film "Black Swan." In these uncertain economic times, many film studios and other employers have been hiring more unpaid interns. For the company that hires interns, the benefit is a free worker, and for the intern the benefit is a learning experience, and possibly a paid job offer in the future. The federal labor department has a set list of rules that unpaid internships must follow: the position should benefit the intern, it should not displace other employees, and it should be educational. Did Fox Searchlight violate these rules?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

50th anniversary of “Ben-Hur”

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Catherine Wyler talks about the 50th anniversary of “Ben-Hur,” which her father, William Wyler, directed. The film won 11 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor. Blu-ray is releasing an “Ultimate Collector’s Edition” of the film September 27. It’s also playing at the New York Film Festival on Saturday, October 1.

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The Takeaway

Country Music Reflects America's Struggles

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Country music has enjoyed a long tradition of reflecting the everyday concerns of working men and women, good times and bad times. With 14 million Americans currently out of work, a crippling national debt, and a record number of people living below the poverty line, country music may be going through a sea change. Call it an indicator of economic times but in the time it took pickup trucks to go from stripped down working class boxes of mud and steel to plush seated luxury vehicles, country music went from the folksy tinny common man voice of Woody Guthrie to the likes of Tim McGraw singing about the perils of being rich.

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The Takeaway

Paul McCartney on His First Ballet, 'Ocean's Kingdom'

Friday, September 23, 2011

Last night in front of a sold-out crowd at Lincoln Center in New York, Sir Paul McCartney premiered his first ballet, "Ocean's Kingdom." It's a surprising new chapter from a man who can't read or write music. The ex-Beatle spoke to the BBC about his latest artistic effort.

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The Takeaway

New Movies: 'Moneyball,' 'Dolphin Tale,' 'Abduction,' 'Killer Elite'

Friday, September 23, 2011

This weekend, a variety of anticipated movies are hitting theaters. "Moneyball," starring Brad Pitt, is a dramatic film based on Michael Lewis's popular 2003 book of the same name. "Dolphin Tale," which stars Morgan Freeman, is a family film based on a true story about an injured bottlenose dolphin. "Abduction" is a thriller about a teenager who discovers that he was kidnapped as a young child. And "Killer Elite" is an action flick with Clive Owen and Robert De Niro.

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The Takeaway

R.E.M. Splits Up After 31 Years

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Since the 1980s, R.E.M. has been a reliable presence on the pop music scene. Songs like "What's the Frequency, Kenneth?" and "Losing My Religion" helped define what indie rock would sound like for the next two decades; and for better or for worse, songs like "Everybody Hurts" and "Shiny Happy People" will forever be a part of our alt rock lexicon. Now that they've disbanded, what are we to make of their place in the rock canon?

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The Takeaway

Author Sylvia Nasar on Early 'Economic Genius'

Monday, September 19, 2011

In uncertain financial times, it seems every economist has their own opinion on how to revive the economy. But the idea that we could study the marketplace and deduce how to control and improve it was once radical. Decades before the Great Recession, students studied economics in order to become masters of their own fate. A new book examines the development of economic theory, from the Age of Industrial Revolution to World War II.

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The Takeaway

'Modern Family' Wins Big at the Emmys

Monday, September 19, 2011

The much beloved ABC sitcom "Modern Family" took home five trophies last night at the 63rd annual Emmy awards last night. AMC's "Mad Men" and HBO's "Boardwalk Empire" and "Game of Thrones" were also big winners. The Takeaway's culture producer, Kristen Meinzer watched last night's awards and has her critique on the program.

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The Takeaway

The Future of Opera Could Be in China

Monday, September 05, 2011

Most of us think of opera as a traditionally Western art. Historically, the best composers wrote in French, Italian, German or English — until now. Over the past decade, the Chinese government has devoted millions to new opera houses, opera festivals and music education. The Chinese investment in opera has piqued the interest of classical music students here in the U.S., where budget-cutting has sapped funding for the arts.

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The Takeaway

Movie Date: Fall Movie Preview

Sunday, September 04, 2011

In this week's Movie Date podcast, Kristen and Rafer take a look back at the summer that was...a "bummer summer." But rather than harp on how they were disappointed with the list of blockbusters that didn't deliver, they look forward at the movies being released this fall, and talk about what they're looking forward to and what they're dreading. From that list, our critics make picks for each other to see. What do they pick and how do they react? You'll have to listen to find out. 

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The Takeaway

Summer Book Club: 'The Submission'

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

As the tenth anniversary of September 11 approaches, our host John Hockenberry decided to focus his summer reading on novels about 9/11. This week's pick touches upon how we memorialize a tragedy, which can be extremely political.

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The Takeaway

Summer Book Club: Jonathan Safran Foer's 'Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close'

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Our summer book club continues today with host John Hockenberry's first pick for August. John sees summer reading as an opportunity for challenge. He spent one summer reading the Russian literature, and the following summer he devoted his reading to Charles Dickens. This summer, as the tenth anniversary of September 11 approaches, John decided it was time to tackle a few of the recent novels that deal with that tragic day. His first pick is Jonathan Safran Foer’s "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close." The novel follows nine-year-old Oskar Schell in the years after his father dies in the World Trade Center on 9/11. Foer sat down with John to discuss his 2005 novel.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Marie Riviere on Working with Eric Rohmer

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Actress Marie Riviere discusses working with Eric Rohmer in his films “Le Rayon Vert” (celebrating its 25th anniversary) and its long-overlooked companion piece, “Four Adventures of Reinette and Mirabelle.” She’ll also talk about her brand new video portrait of Eric Rohmer, “In the Company of Eric Rohmer,” which she made shortly before his death. “Four Adventures of Reinette and Mirabelle” is showing at BAM Cinematek July 20-26.

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