Streams

 

Arts And Culture

The Takeaway

$1 Billion in Art Seized by Nazis Found in Munich

Monday, November 04, 2013

Over the weekend it was revealed that 1,500 pieces of art that disappeared in the Nazi era--- by the likes of Matisse, Picasso and Chagall--- have been recovered in Munich and valued at 1 billion dollars. Jonathan Petropoulos, John V. Croul professor of European History at Claremont McKenna College, discusses this discovery.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jeremy Denk Performs Bach's Goldberg Variations

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Acclaimed pianist and 2013 MacArthur Fellow Jeremy Denk performs some of Bach’s Goldberg Variations live in our studios. His latest album is J. S. Bach: Goldberg Variations. He’ll also talk about his writing for The New Yorker.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

The Surprising History of an American Anthem

Thursday, July 04, 2013

In 1918 Irving Berlin composed a show tune called "God Bless America." But he never would have imagined that his work would eventually become a nationally known patriotic anthem. Sheryl Kaskowitz tells the story of its evolution and deep history in the new book, "God Bless America: The Surprising History of an Iconic Song." She explains the song's unexpected journey that led it to become a staple of American culture.

Comments [1]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Is Science Enough?

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

Curtis White, novelist, essayist, English professor at Illinois State University, and author of the Science Delusion: Asking the Big Questions in a Culture of Easy Answers, defends poetry and philosophy against the culture of "scientism," despite his own atheism.

Event: Curtis White in conversation with with Lewis Lapham at Melville House 145 Plymouth St. in Brooklyn (DUMBO) tonight at 7pm,

 

Comments [35]

The Takeaway

New Movie Releases: 'Peeples' and 'The Great Gatsby'

Friday, May 10, 2013

In this week's look at new movies, Rafer and Kristen discuss complicated family reunions, party crashing, and what happens when eccentric Australian directors take on American classics. It's all in honor of two new releases: "Peeples" and "The Great Gatsby."

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Listening in on "The Lives of Other Citizens"

Monday, May 06, 2013

New Yorkers keep company with their thoughts as they make their way through the city's streets.  But what are they thinking? A project called "New York Stories: The Lives of Other Citizens" attempts to map those inner thoughts of ordinary people. Andrew Irving, Anthropology Professor at the University of Manchester simply approached strangers on the street and asked them if they would wear a small microphone and narrate their thoughts as they walked through the city.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Movie Date: 'Rise of the Guardians', 'Silver Linings Playbook', 'Life of Pi', 'Red Dawn', 'Anna Karenina

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

WNYC

For this Thanksgiving's box office releases, the movie date team reviews four movies; 'Rise of the Guardians', 'Silver linings Playbook',  'Life of Pi',  and  'Red Dawn.'

Read More

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

New Movies: 'Life of Pi,' 'Red Dawn,' 'Hitchcock'

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

For this Thanksgiving's box office releases, Kristen Meinzer and Rafer Guzman, our Movie Date team, review four movies, including "Life of Pie."

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Henry James and His American Masterpiece

Thursday, September 06, 2012

Literary critic Michael Gorra discusses his biography of Henry James told through the lens of his greatest novel, Portrait of a Lady. In Portrait of a Novel: Henry James and the Making of an American Masterpiece tells how Portrait of a Lady—the scandalous story of the expatriate American heiress Isabel Archer—came to be written in the first place, sheds new light on James’s family, the European literary circles in which he made his name.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Century of the Child at MoMA

Monday, August 27, 2012

Curator Juliet Kinchin discusses the exhibition “Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900-2000,” a survey of 20th-century design for children, that brings together school architecture, playgrounds, toys and games, animation, clothing, safety equipment and therapeutic products, nurseries, furniture, and books. “Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900-2000” is on view at MoMA through November 5.

Comments [5]

The Takeaway

New Movie Releases: 'Prometheus', 'Madagascar 3'

Friday, June 08, 2012

This week’s big release is “Prometheus,” starring Michael Fassbender and Charlize Theron. Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, hosts this week's Movie Date.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

“Clybourne Park”

Friday, June 01, 2012

Jeremy Shamos and Crystal Dickinson discuss their roles in “Clybourne Park,” winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize and London’s Olivier award for Best Play. The play deals with race, real estate, and the volatile values of each. Act One takes is set in 1959, as community leaders try to stop the sale of a home to a black family, and Act Two is set in the same house in the present day, as the now predominantly African-American neighborhood struggles with gentrification. “Clybourne Park” is playing at the Walter Kerr Theatre.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

“Lonely, I’m Not”

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Topher Grace and Olivia Thirlby discuss their roles in the play “Lonely, I’m Not.” The play is a comic journey that follows Porter, who has been married and divorced, earned seven figures as a corporate “ninja,” and had a nervous breakdown. He meets an ambitious young businesswoman who is overcoming her own obstacles to emotional success. “Lonely, I’m Not” is playing at the Second Stage Theater through June 3.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Serge Bromberg on “A Trip to the Moon and Other Travels”

Monday, April 09, 2012

Film preservationist and entertainer Serge Bromberg talks about his recently restored color version of Georges Méliès’ film "A Trip to the Moon" and a selection of rare silent films from around the world. The program “A Trip to the Moon and Other Travels” is playing at BAM April 9, at 7 pm, and features silent shorts with live accompaniment from Bromberg, including: "A Trip Down Market Street" (1906), "San Francisco After the Catastrophe" (1906), "After the Ball" (1897), and "The Love Nest" (1923) a Buster Keaton short about a boat trip.

Comment

The Takeaway

200th Birthday of Charles Dickens

Tuesday, February 07, 2012

A day of Great Expectations for fans of Charles Dickens. Today's marks the 200th birthday of the writer who gave us "A Tale of Two Cities," "A Christmas Carol," "David Copperfield," among many others. Joining us now from the BBC's studio's in Cambridge England is Dr Jan-Melissa Schramm a Dickens fan, a lecturer in Victorian literature at Trinity Hall of Cambridge University.

Comment

The Takeaway

Shedding Light on the World's Most Mysterious Regime

Thursday, January 12, 2012

To citizens around the world, what goes on above the 38th parallel is largely a mystery. Though there are no questions about the numerous human rights abuses that go on in North Korea — extreme food rationing and hunger, arbitrary violence by the state, the impossibility of traveling past the country's borders — the daily reality of living through them have gone undocumented. Through years of research, Adam Johnson attempts to convey the very real and existential crises North Koreans face with his new novel.

Comment

The Takeaway

Pain, Music and Destiny: Bob Dylan

Monday, January 02, 2012

Some might joke that his vocal chords are indeed much older, but celebrated folk legend Bob Dylan turned 70-years-old last year. Recently audio has surfaced from 1966, in which the singer speaks to a good friend during a flight from Nebraska to Colorado about struggling with addiction and contemplating suicide. It's the latest in a long narrative about a truly singular singer whose mysteries are still being revealed. We take a listen to some of the audio in question, and music that made Dylan a force of musical nature.

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

Country Music Reflects America's Struggles

Monday, January 02, 2012

Country music has enjoyed a long tradition of reflecting the everyday concerns of working men and women, good times and bad times. With 14 million Americans currently out of work, a crippling national debt, and a record number of people living below the poverty line, country music may be going through a sea change. Call it an indicator of economic times but in the time it took pickup trucks to go from stripped down working class boxes of mud and steel to plush seated luxury vehicles, country music went from the folksy tinny common man voice of Woody Guthrie to the likes of Tim McGraw singing about the perils of being rich.

Comment

The Takeaway

Home From Battle, An Iraq War Vet Teaches Ballet

Thursday, December 29, 2011

Roman Baca is an Iraq War veteran and the artistic director of Exit 12 Dance Company. He has toured veterans hospitals and military bases around the world with his ballet "The Homecoming," which is about service members dealing with homesickness and the experiences of their loved ones waiting at home. He is heading back to Iraq, but this time as a dance teacher.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Movie Date: 'War Horse,' 'Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,' 'We Bought a Zoo,' and 'The Artist'

Friday, December 23, 2011

Stephen Spielberg's adaptation of the Michael Morpurgo novel "War Horse," the adaptation of Jonathan Safran Foer's novel "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," and Cameron Crowe's "We Bought a Zoo" are slated to be this week's newly-released, big box office winners. "The Artist," which topped many years' best lists and has only been in a handful of theaters, also opens across the country this weekend. 

Comment