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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Sun Ra's Omniverse

Thursday, October 31, 2013

WNYC

Listen to Sun Ra's complete January 7th, 1981 Whitney Museum concert, broadcast on WNYC.

 

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The Takeaway

How America's Superheroes Conquered the World

Thursday, October 10, 2013

How did Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman and so many other famous American superheroes emerge from a niche comic book industry created to escape the woes of the Great Depression? The Takeaway talks with Michael Kantor about his new film, “Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle,” and Phil Jimenez, a comic book artist and writer featured in the series. The film considers the evolution and lasting cultural legacy of some of America's most popular cultural icons.

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WNYC News

The Culture Shed: Arts Community Friend or Foe?

Thursday, August 01, 2013

The mayor's capital budget allotted an unusually large sum of money to a project that doesn't even exist yet.  The Culture Shed at Hudson Yards received a $50 million cultural capital grant, and it hasn't even established a construction budget or hired any employees.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Tribeca Film Festival Kicks Off

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

The Tribeca Film Festival is its 12th year. Chief creative officer, Geoffrey Gilmore, discusses how the Festival has shaped downtown Manhattan and which films exemplify its mission.

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Operavore

What I Subscribe To

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Operavore blogger Fred Plotkin ponders the role of subscriptions in the health of performance arts institutions.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Robert Moog Interview Circa 1980

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

WNYC

The Archives Department celebrates Robert Moog's 78th birthday with this 1980s episode of WQXR's This is My Music.  Host Lloyd Moss talks with the inventor and musical pioneer and plays selections from Moog's library of compositions and influences. The program includes a virtuosic performance of Wieniawski's Violin Concerto No. 2 adapted for theremin and piano.  

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Features

Brooklyn's Moving Images Get 'Scene'

Thursday, May 05, 2011

The Brooklyn Arts Council kicks off its third annual Scene: Brooklyn film and media arts festival on Thursday under the archway of the Manhattan Bridge in Dumbo.

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The Takeaway

New Study: Narcissistic Culture Leads to Narcissistic Lyrics

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Pop lyrics seem to have taken a turn towards the "me" and "I" variety, according to a new study. The study analyzed three decades of songs, and concluded that song lyrics have become more narcissistic in recent years, reflecting current youth culture. Is that really true? Maura Johnston, music editor for The Village Voice, lends her thoughts on this topic.

We want to know: Do you believe you are narcissistic? Take this test and find out.

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The Takeaway

Mourning the Manual Typewriter

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Although electronic typewriters are still being manufactured, the last of the manual machines are up for sale as the last Indian company to make them is shutting down production. However, typewriters will likely continue to be sold amongst collectors like Richard Polt, who owns 250 of them. He says that one of the best reasons to use a typewriter today is that they come without the distractions of being on a computer (like the Internet).

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The Takeaway

The Great International Autism Road Trip

Friday, April 01, 2011

"Wretches and Jabberers" is a buddy movie, a road trip movie and a moving adventure. But this new film is different than your typical mainstream fare. The documentary stars two autistic friends and advocates who do most of their communicating through typing. The story follows Larry Bissonnette and Tracy Thresher, as well as their assistants Pascal Cheng and Harvey Lavoy, as they travel around the world, meet other autistic people, and advocate for autism rights.

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The Takeaway

The Legacy of the National Black Theatre

Friday, January 28, 2011

Nina Simone was just one of the immense talents to grace the stage of the National Black Theatre over it’s long history in Harlem. Others like actor Ruby Dee, and poets Maya Angelou and Nikki Giovanni also performed there. We look at the important cultural legacy of the National Black Theatre, which was founded by the late Barbara Ann Teer in 1968.

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The Takeaway

Why We Watch: Television Viewing Hits Record High

Tuesday, January 04, 2011

With national unemployment at record levels, an economy seemingly reluctant to get out of first gear, and experts struggling to solve a foreclosure crisis, it may come as no surprise that Americans are watching more television. According to the Nielsen Company, we’re watching a lot more TV than we used to. Nielsen collects viewer data and television ratings, and says that the average American now watches about 34 hours of television on any given week.

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The Takeaway

Predictor of Financial Crisis Dispenses Bite-Sized Wisdom

Monday, December 13, 2010

Nassim Taleb is the philosopher and former trader who correctly predicted that the mathematical models Wall Street used to measure risk would lead to a massive financial crisis. His new book, ‘The Bed of Procrustes,’ scrutinizes the economy, as well as human knowledge and values. The book features "practical and philosophical aphorisms," and includes fortune-cookie sized sentences that attempt to "expose self-delusions you have been living with but have never recognized."

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The Takeaway

'Wake Up' with John Legend

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

John Legend has racked up six Grammy awards and gathered a loyal fan base. His long time projects with The Roots have given him a place in the contemporary music scene that most musicians would envy, and his nods to influences like Stevie Wonder give him crossover power for an older audience as well. Legend joins us to discuss his latest and more pointedly political album, "Wake Up," on which he and The Roots collaborated yet again.

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The Takeaway

American Ballet Theates Travels to Cuba After 50 Year Hiatus

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

The American Ballet Theatre traveled to Cuba for the first time in 50 years to participate in the 22nd Havana International Ballet Festival. The last time the dance company took the stage in Cuba, Fidel Castro had just taken power. We hear music from the Karl Marx theatre and talk with Rachel Moore, the executive director of the American Ballet Theatre, about the trip.

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The Takeaway

Danielle Evans and 'Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self'

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

At 26, Danielle Evans is already the kind of writer who makes other writers jealous. She's still fresh from the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, but she's already been chosen – twice –  for The Best American Short Stories, and both Salman Rushdie and Richard Russo have praised her work. There's already a lot of buzz around her new book, a collection of eight short stories called “Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self.” She joins us to talk about the challenges of being a young black writer in a world that's not over race, but may be over talking about it.

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The Takeaway

Haitian-American Novelist Edwidge Danticat Looks to 'Create Dangerously'

Friday, October 01, 2010

Haitian American novelist Edwidge Danticat has been busy, of late.  She has two new books hitting bookstores this fall: Eight Days is a children's book about a boy trapped in the rubble after the earthquake in Haiti, and Create Dangerously is a book of reflections on the task of the immigrant writer.

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The Takeaway

Emma Donoghue on Her New Novel, 'Room'

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The daily life of any young child is filled with creative observations of the world we wish we could recapture as adults. Author Emma Donoghue has managed to capture, to stunning effect, those creative perceptions from the perspective of a five-year-old boy named Jack, in her new novel, “Room.”

But the story begins in a deceptively dark place when we learn that Jack and his 27-year-old mother are trapped. They’re held captive by Jack’s father and have been since Jack was born.

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The Takeaway

Vicarious Living and 'A Short History of Celebrity'

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Snooki did not invent celebrity – and chances are she won't break it either.

That's according to Professor Fred Inglis, author of "A Short History of Celebrity." Inglis is a cultural historian, and he takes the long view on our fascination with the likes of Tiger Woods, Marilyn Monroe and Angelina Jolie. Over the past 200 years, says Inglis, it has become easier and easier to live vicariously. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Emerging Artists Curate NYC

Monday, September 27, 2010

Full Spectrum has teamed up with the New York City Economic Development Corporation to produce Curate NYC, a program and contest for emerging artists to show their work at locations throughout the city.  Full Spectrum co-founders Brian Tate and Danny Simmons preview the exhibition, which will take place October 21-31.

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