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Art And Design

The Leonard Lopate Show

Saul Steinberg: A Biography

Monday, January 14, 2013

National Book Award winner Deidre Bair discusses the life and work of Saul Steinberg, one of The New Yorker's most iconic artists. Saul Steinberg: A Biography reveals one of the most fascinating lives and influential artists of the 20th century.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Risk and Reward

Monday, January 14, 2013

Ping Fu talks about her remarkable journey escaping the Chinese Cultural Revolution to becoming an entrepreneurial leader in the United States. National Book Award Winner Deidre Bair discusses her new biography of iconic New Yorker artist Saul Steinberg. We’ll get a preview of The Public Theater’s Under the Radar Festival. Plus, Glenn Croston explains how we misinterpret risk.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Lessons Learned

Tuesday, January 08, 2013

Julie Burstein fills in for Leonard Lopate. On today’s show: We’ll find out how Michelle Rhee’s attempts to reform Washington, D.C.’s, schools made her a highly controversial national figure. Actor Jeff Bridges and his Buddhist teacher Roshi Bernie Glassman talks about their decades-long dialogue on life, friendship, and the movies. Woodcarver David Esterly talks about being asked to replace a destroyed masterpiece. And Ray Fisman and Tim Sullivan look at the trade-offs and inefficiencies inherent in every organization—from McDonald’s to Al Qaeda.

The Leonard Lopate Show

David Esterly on the Lost Carving

Tuesday, January 08, 2013

Woodcarver David Esterly talks about the art and craft of carving wood. He is the foremost practitioner of Grinling Gibbons’s forgotten technique, which revolutionized ornamental sculpture in the late 1600s with its spectacular cascades of flowers, fruits, and foliage.  When fire at Henry VIII’s Hampton Court Palace destroyed a Gibbons masterpiece, Esterly was asked to replace it. He tells the story of that challenge in The Lost Carving: A Journey to the Heart of Making, and explores the connection between creativity and physical work.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hot and Cold

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

On today’s show: Boston Globe language columnist Ben Zimmer discusses the best—and worst—words of 2012, including “selfie,” “YOLO,” and “Romnesia.” Jon Wiener helps us understand how the Cold War is being remembered—or forgotten—across the country. Chris Ware talks about a new box set that collects a decades worth of his acclaimed Building Stories comics. And historian Richard Lingeman looks at how the late 1940s set the stage for the Korean War and the Red Scare.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mantegna to Matisse at the Frick Collection

Thursday, December 06, 2012

Colin Bailey, Deputy Director and Chief Curator of the Frick Collection, discusses the exhibition Mantegna to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Courtauld Gallery. It features 58 drawings from the Courtauld Gallery, London, that show extraordinary drawings made between the late Middle Ages and the early 20 century by artists including Mantegna, da Vinci, Dürer, Rubens, Rembrandt Goya, Turner, Degas, Paul Cézanne, van Gogh, Seurat, Matisse, and Picasso.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fair Game

Thursday, December 06, 2012

New York Times Social Q’s columnist Philip Galanes gives advice on how to survive the holidays—from regifting to navigating boozy office parties. Susannah Cahalan describes her month of madness, caused by a mysterious illness that affected her brain. Colin Bailey, Deputy Director and Chief Curator of the Frick Collection, talks about the exhibition Mantegna to Matisse. Plus we’ll look at why the landmark 1968 Fair Housing Act, which was supposed to help integrate cities, has gone largely unenforced.

The Leonard Lopate Show

"Faking It" at the Metropolitan Museum

Monday, November 05, 2012

Curator Mia Fineman talks about the exhibition Faking It: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop, on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through January 27, 2013. The exhibition traces the history of manipulated photography from the 1840s through the early 1990s, when the computer replaced manual techniques as the dominant means of doctoring photographs.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Leonardo and the Last Supper

Monday, November 05, 2012

In 1495 in Milan, Leonardo da Vinci began working on what would become one of the most influential and beloved works of art-The Last Supper. Ross King explores how-amid war and the political and religious turmoil, and beset by his own insecurities and frustrations-Leonardo created the masterpiece that would forever define him. in Leonardo and the Last Supper, King presents an original portrait of one of the world's greatest geniuses through the lens of his most famous work. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Joel Meyerowitz and Maggie Barrett on Photography

Monday, October 29, 2012

Photographer Joel Meyerowitz and his wife and collaborator Maggie Barrett, a novelist and playwright, discuss the new two-part exhibition of his work at Howard Greenberg Gallery, and his new book, Joel Meyerowitz: Taking My Time, which features nearly 600 photographs spanning his career.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Century of the Child at MoMA

Monday, August 27, 2012

Curator Juliet Kinchin discusses the exhibition “Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900-2000,” a survey of 20th-century design for children, that brings together school architecture, playgrounds, toys and games, animation, clothing, safety equipment and therapeutic products, nurseries, furniture, and books. “Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900-2000” is on view at MoMA through November 5.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Life and Times of David Wojnarowicz

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Cynthia Carr talks about the controversial artist David Wojnarowicz, whose artwork made headlines in 2010 when the National Portrait Gallery in Washington responded to responded to protests from the Catholic League and censored an excerpt of his short film, “A Fire in My Belly.” Carr’s biography Fire in the Belly: The Life and Times of David Wojnarowicz is a close look at the man who became one of the most important voices of his generation, from his unhappy childhood to his formative role in the time in New York's East Village to his death from AIDS in 1992 at the age of 37.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry

Friday, July 27, 2012

Director Alison Klayman discusses her documentary “Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry,” an up-close look at renowned Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei and his ongoing battle with the Chinese government. Ai Weiwei is China's most celebrated contemporary artist, who helped design Beijing’s Bird’s Nest Olympic Stadium, and its most outspoken domestic critic. Against a backdrop of strict censorship, Ai has become a kind of Internet champion, using his blog and Twitter stream to organize, inform, and inspire his followers, becoming an underground hero to millions of Chinese citizens. “Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry” opens July 27 at the Lincoln Plaza Cinemas and IFC Center.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Glass Lab on Governor's Island

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the studio glass movement in the United States, and to celebrate, the Corning Museum of Glass has built a mobile Glass Lab, which is traveling around the country giving free glassblowing demonstrations and working with designers to create unique forms in glass. This month it's been at Governors Island, working with designers from the Cooper-Hewitt exhibit there. Master glassblower Eric Meek and with designer Harry Allen tell us about the program and about how to blow glass.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Publicolor

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Ruth Lande Shuman, founder and president of Publicolor, talks about the nonprofit, which uses color, collaboration, design, and painting to re-engage students in their education, schools, and communities.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Value of Art

Monday, July 09, 2012

Art dealer and market expert Michael Findlay explains the market for art—and art's value for all of us. The Value of Art: Money, Power, Beauty looks at almost a half century in the business of art and shows how artworks are valued. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

"Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present"

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Performance artists Marina Abramovic speaks about her career and the documentary “Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present,” along with director Matthew Akers and producer/co-director Jeff Dupre. The documentary opens at Film Forum June 13, and will premiere on HBO on July 2.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Movie Special Effects

Friday, April 20, 2012

Dr. Doug Roble, the Creative Director of Software at Digital Domain, the multiple Academy Award-winning visual effects studio in Venice, California, talks about the history of special effects in filmmaking and explains the art and science of creating them.   

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The 10 Objects that Tell the Story of New York

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Dr. Sarah Henry, chief curator of the Museum of the City of New York, and Ellen Lupton, Cooper-Hewitt’s senior curator of contemporary design, discuss the results of our contest to find the top 10 objects that tell the story of New York

 

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Sculptor Will Ryman

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Sculptor Will Ryman discusses his exhibition of new site-specific works at the Paul Kasmin Galleries in Chelsea, Anyone and No One, on view February 16—March 24. Formerly a playwright whose work was largely influenced by Absurdist philosophy, Ryman's works incorporate autobiographical, spiritual and art historical references.

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