Streams

 

Art And Design

The Leonard Lopate Show

How Words on a Page Become Images in Our Minds

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Peter Mendelsund, Knopf's associate art director, explores how we visualize images from reading works of literature and talks about designing book covers.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The High-Flying History of Superman

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Larry Tye tells the history of Superman, who after 75 years remains one of America’s most enduring heroes. In Superman: The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero, Tye looks at the history of the Man of Steel and also of the creators, designers, owners, and performers who made him the icon he is today.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Sculptor Ursula von Rydingsvard

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Sculptor Ursula von Rydingsvard discusses her work and her sculpture “Ona,” a 19-and-a-half-foot tall, nearly 12-thousand-pound bronze art work that was commissioned as a permanent installation in the plaza in front of Barclays Center in Brooklyn.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: Ursula von Rydingsvard

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Ursula von Rydingsvard was on the Leonard Lopate Show to talk about her sculpture, "Ona," which is permanently installed in the plaza at the Barclays Center. She also told us what she's been reading and listening to recently. (We do like her taste in radio stations...)

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Sheri Fink on Five Days at Memorial; Rick Hall and "Muscle Shoals"; Sculptor Ursula von Rydingsvard

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Pulitzer Prize-winner Sheri Fink reveals the shocking story behind patient deaths at a New Orleans hospital in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. We’ll take a look at Muscle Shoals—Rick Hall describes putting the small Alabama town on the map with his FAME studios where some of the greatest pop music hits of the past 50 years have been recorded. Sculptor Ursula von Rydingsvard on her work “Ona,” a 19-and-a-half foot tall piece that’s been permanently installed at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. Plus, a look at the military commission that will soon hear the trial of Abd al-Nashiri, the alleged mastermind behind the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Cloisters at 75

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Timothy Husband, Curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, talks about the Cloisters, which is celebrating its 75th anniversary. It's the home of the Metropolitan Museum's collection of Medieval art, including the famed Unicorn tapestries, and the building is constructed out of Medieval buildings from France.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Moving Oil; the Cloisters Anniversary; a New Novel; Drone Attacks; Ten Years After the Blackout

Thursday, August 15, 2013

On today’s show, find out about the Enbridge pipeline. Like the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, it will transport oil from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, but hasn’t received much attention. The mayors of two Illinois towns share their concerns about the safety hazard posed by the oil that travels by train. We’ll mark the 75th anniversary of the Cloisters, the Metropolitan Museum’s Medieval art collection. Peter Mattei talks about his novel The Deep Whatsis. We’ll  look at United States policy on compensating the families of civilians killed in drone strikes. And 10 years after the major Northeast blackout, we’ll find out what’s been done to improve our power grid.

The Leonard Lopate Show

"Hopper Drawing" at the Whitney Museum

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Curator Carter Foster talks about Edward Hopper’s drawings, and how they provide insight into the artist's process. “Hopper Drawing” is on view at the Whitney Museum of Art through October 6, and it features more than 200 drawings, paired with some of the artist's most famous paintings, including “Nighthawks” and “New York Movie.”

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Women Opting Out, Returning to Work; Architect Hugh Hardy; "Hopper Drawings" at the Whitney; the Gurus of How-To

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

On today’s show, Judith Warner talks about the experiences of women who left their careers to stay at home with their young children and are now trying to restart their professional lives. Hugh Hardy reviews his 50-year career in architecture and the challenges, strategies, and human concerns that have influenced his design. Carter Foster discusses the exhibition of drawings by Edward Hopper, now on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art. And Al and Larry Ubell, our gurus of how-to, answer home repair questions from you, our listeners!

The Leonard Lopate Show

The High-Flying History of Superman

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

Larry Tye tells the history of Superman, who after 75 years remains one of America’s most enduring heroes. In Superman: The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero, Tye looks at the history of the Man of Steel and also of the creators, designers, owners, and performers who made him the icon he is today.

Comments [17]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Rescuing Italian Art from Nazis

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

Robert Edsel talks about the men and women who rescued great Italian art from destruction during WWII. In May 1944 two unlikely American heroes—artist Deane Keller and scholar Fred Hartt—set out from Naples to track billions of dollars of missing art, including works by Michelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Caravaggio, and Botticelli. Edsel tells the story in Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation’s Treasures from the Nazis.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Chuck Close: Photo Maquettes

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Artist Chuck Close discusses his work and the photographs he works from to make his large-scale portraits. There’s an exhibition of his photographs, “Chuck Close: Photo Maquettes” is on view Eykyn Maclean Gallery.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Wall Street Manipulation, Chuck Close, Jessica Soffer's Novel, Jeremy Scahill on Covert War

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi talks about whether bankers and brokers manipulated the market rates that affect global borrowing costs. Chuck Close describes the process of using large-scale Polaroid photographs to create his paintings. Jessica Soffer discusses her novel called Tomorrow There Will Be Apricots. The Nation’s Jeremy Scahill talks about America’s covert wars and the elite soldiers who operate in more than 100 countries around the world.

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Look Back at Iraq, The Lost Weekend's Author, Piero della Francesca at the Frick, and Our Word Maven

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

We continue our three-day series to mark the tenth anniversary of the invasion of Iraq. Then, we talk about writer Charles Jackson, whose life and work captured what it meant to be an addict and a closeted gay man in mid-century America. Curator Nathaniel Silver discusses the exhibit of Piero della Francesca paintings at the Frick Collection. And our word maven Patricia T. O’Conner takes your calls and questions on the intricacies and idiosyncrasies of the English language.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Artist El Anatsui

Friday, February 15, 2013

Nigerian artist El Anatsui, best known for shimmering tapestries made from liquor bottle tops, talks about his work. He’s joined by author Susan M. Vogel, who worked closely with Anatsui while directing a documentary film about the artist. Vogel’s book El Anatsui: Art and Life  includes nearly 150 images and traces his lifelong exploration of media leading up to the bottle top art form that has captured the interest of the global art world. The exhibition Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui is on view through August 4 at the Brooklyn Museum.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Life, Death, and Art

Friday, February 15, 2013

Marc Bookman looks into the case of Andre Thomas, who was convicted of murdering his family and sentenced to death, despite the fact that he was mentally ill. Nigerian artist El Anatsui describes creating large tapestries out of unlikely things like bottle caps. He’ll be joined by Susan Vogel, who’s directed a film and written a book about the international art star. Photographer Chester Higgins discusses Ancient Nubia, which stretched along the Nile in southern Egypt and Northern Sudan. Plus, this week’s Please Explain is all about nursing!

The Leonard Lopate Show

V Day Advice

Thursday, February 14, 2013

On today’s show: New York Times Social Q’s columnist Philip Galanes takes your calls and questions about how to navigate the social and romantic minefield that is Valentine’s Day. We’ll look at the life and work of fashion designer Cristobal Balenciaga. Martin Moran talks about his one-man show called “All the Rage.”

The Leonard Lopate Show

"Matisse: In Search of True Painting" at the Met

Friday, January 25, 2013

Curator Rebecca Rabinow talks about the exhibition “Matisse: In Search of True Painting,” on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through March 17. Henri Matisse was one of the most acclaimed artists working in France during the first half of the 20th century, but painting had rarely come easily to Matisse. Throughout his career, he questioned, repainted, and reevaluated his work. This show demonstrates his need to progress methodically from one painting to the next.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Inventing Abstraction at MoMA

Friday, January 18, 2013

Leah Dickerman, Curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, talks about the exhibition “Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925.” Commemorating the centennial of invention of abstraction, the exhibition brings together over 350 works—including paintings, drawings, prints, books, sculptures, films, photographs, recordings, and dance pieces—to offer a sweeping survey of a radical moment when the rules of art making were fundamentally transformed.

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Pulled Apart

Friday, January 18, 2013

On today’s show: We’ll find out how the epidemic of post-traumatic stress disorder among the country’s veterans is spreading to their families. Writer, director, and producer Bill Persky looks back at the Golden Age of television and his work on “The Dick van Dyke Show” and “Kate and Allie,” and other hit shows. The curator of “Inventing Abstraction” at the Museum of Modern Art talks about how abstraction transformed art. Plus: this week’s Please Explain is all about our troubled postal service.