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Art And Culture

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Life and Times of David Wojnarowicz

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Cynthia Carr talks about the controversial artist David Wojnarowicz, whose artwork made headlines in 2010 when the National Portrait Gallery in Washington responded to responded to protests from the Catholic League and censored an excerpt of his short film, “A Fire in My Belly.” Carr’s biography Fire in the Belly: The Life and Times of David Wojnarowicz is a close look at the man who became one of the most important voices of his generation, from his unhappy childhood to his formative role in the time in New York's East Village to his death from AIDS in 1992 at the age of 37.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

John Cage and Zen Buddhism

Monday, July 23, 2012

Kay Larson talks about how Zen Buddhism influenced American artists in the years following World War II, especially experimental composer John Cage. In Where the Heart Beats: John Cage, Zen Buddhism, and the Inner Life of Artists looks at how his conversion to Zen Buddhism empowered him to compose his music and to inspire transformations in the lives of his fellow artists.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Fan Who Knew Too Much

Monday, July 09, 2012

Cultural historian and biographer Anthony Heilbut looks at some of our American icons and iconic institutions, high, low, and exalted. The Fan Who Knew Too Much: Aretha Franklin, the Rise of the Soap Opera, Children of the Gospel Church, and Other Meditations is an exploration of art and obsession and the figures who transformed the American cultural landscape.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Sculptor Will Ryman

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Sculptor Will Ryman discusses his exhibition of new site-specific works at the Paul Kasmin Galleries in Chelsea, Anyone and No One, on view February 16—March 24. Formerly a playwright whose work was largely influenced by Absurdist philosophy, Ryman's works incorporate autobiographical, spiritual and art historical references.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Renaissance Portrait at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Curators Keith Christiansen and Andrea Bayer discuss the exhibition "The Renaissance Portrait from Donatello to Bellini," on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through March 18. It celebrates Italian 15th-century portraiture, bringing together approximately 160 works by Donatello, Filippo Lippi, Botticelli, Verrocchio, Ghirlandaio, Pisanello, Mantegna, Giovanni Bellini, and Antonello da Messina, and includes painting, manuscript illumination, marble sculpture and bronze medals. 

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The Takeaway

'Haywire' Director Steven Soderbergh with Star of Film, Gina Carano

Friday, January 20, 2012

Steven Soderbergh is a director who is not afraid to try new things. His films range from a remake of the popular rat pack vehicle "Ocean’s Eleven" to the multi-part biopic “Che” to his experimental film "Scizopolis." On Friday his latest risky endeavor, "Haywire," hits theaters. Newcomer Gina Carano stars as a mixed martial arts fighter who seeks revenge after being betrayed during a mission.

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The Takeaway

Abraham Verghese: A Place to Call Home

Monday, January 02, 2012

Dr. Abraham Verghese first joined The Takeaway as part of the "My America" series. Verghese was raised in Ethiopia, by parents from India. He immigrated to the U.S. in the 1980s for a medical residency, and then to rural Tennessee treat gay men afflicted with HIV. Later, he became a professor at Stanford University Medical School and the author of the best-sellers, "My Own Country" and "Cutting for Stone."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Nile Rodgers on Family, Disco, and Destiny

Thursday, December 29, 2011

Nile Rodgers, composer, arranger, and guitarist, explains how he became one of the most influential music producers in the history of popular music. In the 1970s and 1980s, he wrote and produced the songs that defined pop music: “Le Freak,” “We Are Family,” “Like a Virgin,” “Modern Love,” “The Reflex,” and “Rapper’s Delight,” to name a few. He worked with everyone from Diana Ross and Michael Jackson, from Madonna to INXS.  In Le Freak: An Upside Down Story of Family, Disco, and Destiny he tells about his upbringing, how he got his start in music, and how he pioneered his trademark sound.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Diego Rivera's Murals at MoMA

Thursday, December 08, 2011

Curator Leah Dickerman discusses the murals and career of Diego Rivera. “Diego Rivera: Murals for the Museum of Modern Art” is on view at MoMA through May 14. The exhibition features murals, which are up to six feet by eight feet in size and weigh as much as 1,000 pounds, made of frescoed plaster, concrete, and steel. There are also three working drawings, a “portable mural” made in 1930, and smaller prints, watercolors, and drawings.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Portrait of a Patron Family, Vienna 1900

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Tim Bonyhady tells the story of an eminent Viennese family who were among the great patrons of early-20th-century Viennese culture at its peak. Good Living Street: Portrait of a Patron Family, Vienna 1900 takes us from the Gallias’ middle-class prosperity in the provinces of central Europe to their arrival in Vienna, their collections of art and design; their cosmopolitan society; their religious life and their efforts to circumvent the city’s rampant anti-Semitism, and their escape from Nazi Austria and new life in Australia.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jane Powell and Robert Osborne on "Style and Motion: The Art of the Movie Poster"

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Actress Jane Powell, one of Hollywood's most sparkling musical performers of the 1940s and 1950s, and TCM host Robert Osborne discuss the Film Society and Turner Classic Movies’ ongoing Furman Gallery exhibition,Style and Motion: The Art of the Movie Poster. Powell starred in such musical classics as Stanley Donen's Royal Wedding (1951) and Seven Brides For Seven Brothers (1954).

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Journals of Spalding Gray

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Nell Casey discusses putting together The Journals of Spalding Gray. Culled from more than 5,000 pages and including interviews with friends, colleagues, and family, the book paints a haunting portrait of a creative genius. Gray writes about his childhood; his craving for success; the downtown New York arts scene of the 1970s; his love affairs, marriages and fatherhood; his travels, and his passion for the theater.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Nile Rodgers on Family, Disco, and Destiny

Monday, October 17, 2011

Nile Rodgers, composer, arranger, and guitarist, explains how he became one of the most influential music producers in the history of popular music. In the 1970s and 1980s, he wrote and produced the songs that defined pop music: “Le Freak,” “We Are Family,” “Like a Virgin,” “Modern Love,” “The Reflex,” and “Rapper’s Delight,” to name a few. He worked with everyone from Diana Ross and Michael Jackson, from Madonna to INXS.  In Le Freak: An Upside Down Story of Family, Disco, and Destiny he tells about his upbringing, how he got his start in music, and how he pioneered his trademark sound.

Comments [9]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Ninth Annual Home Movie Day

Friday, October 14, 2011

Walter Forsberg, research fellow at NYU's Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program, and Louise Weinberg, registrar and curator at the Queens Museum of Art, discuss the Ninth Annual Home Movie Day, a day-long celebration of amateur filmmaking and home movie preservation. This year’s featured subject is the 1939-1940 New York World’s Fair, and the event takes place Saturday, October 15, at the Queens Museum of Art. Members of the public are invited to bring their home movies to a local event where they will be inspected by projectionists and shared with the audience.

Walter Forsberg and Louise Weinberg on the upcoming Ninth Annual Home Movie Day,  a free event held at Queens Museum of Art on Saturday, October 15, from 1 - 5 pm. Films to be accepted for inspection one hour before event starts. This year, the featured subject is the 1939-1940 New York World’s Fair.
http://www.queensmuseum.org/dont-throw-your-films-away-bring-them-to-home-movie-day

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Eve Sussman and Jeff Wood on “whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoir”

Thursday, October 13, 2011

Eve Sussman, director of  “whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoir,” and Jeff Wood, her lead actor and collaborator, talk about the film. “whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoir” delivers a changing narrative—culled from 3,000 clips, 80 voice-overs and 150 pieces of music—that runs forever and never plays the same way twice. It follows the observations and surveillance of a geophysicist named Holz—the character is controlled by the city and the factory he is working in, and course of the story is controlled by the machine that edits the film. “whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoir,” is being shown at Cristin Tierney Gallery, 546 West 29th Street.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

John Summers Talks About Critic Dwight Macdonald

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

John Summers, the editor of The Baffler, discusses the American critic and writer Dwight Macdonald, an uncompromising contrarian, a passionate polemicist, an anarchist, and a pacifist. Summers assembled new selection of Macdonald’s finest essays, Masscult and Midcult Essays Against the American Grain. It shows Dwight Macdonald as a critic of America’s susceptibility to cultural fakery—he dubbed this phenomenon “Midcult” and he attacked it on aesthetic and on political grounds.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Edmund de Waal on The Hare with Amber Eyes

Monday, October 03, 2011

Edmund de Waal, a world-famous ceramicist who inherited a collection of 264 tiny Japanese wood and ivory carvings, called netsuke. He describes his quest to find out who had touched and held them, and how the collection had managed to survive. The Hare with Amber Eyes is part-memoir and part detective story of his discovery both the story of the netsuke and of his family over five generations.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How the World Became Modern

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Stephen Greenblatt tells how one ancient manuscript, brought to light after a thousand years of neglect, changed the course of human thought and made possible the world as we know it. The Swerve: How the World Became Modern looks at the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic, On the Nature of Things, by Lucretius, sparked the Renaissance, inspiring artists such as Botticelli and thinkers such as Giordano Bruno; shaped the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein; and had a revolutionary influence on writers such as Montaigne and Shakespeare and even Thomas Jefferson.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

InSite: Art + Commemoration

Wednesday, September 07, 2011

Kay Takeda, Director, Grants & Services, at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, which was displaced from the World Trade Center after 9/11, and Nadine Robinson, a 2001 LMCC artist-in-residence at the World Trade Center, discusses the program InSite: Art + Commemoration, ten artistic responses to mark the ten-year anniversary of September 11—on view online through October 11.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Collecting Matisse and Modern Masters, at The Jewish Museum

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Curator Karen Levitov talks about The Jewish Museum exhibition “Collecting Matisse and Modern Masters: The Cone Sisters of Baltimore.” It shows work from the collection of two sisters from Baltimore, the daughters of prosperous German-Jewish immigrants, who traveled in Europe, knew Gertrude Stein, and collected works of art by Matisse, Picasso, Gauguin, van Gogh, Cezanne, and other modern masters. The collection is on loan from the Baltimore Museum of Art and is on view at The Jewish Museum through September 25.

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