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Art

The Leonard Lopate Show

Leaving America, Struggling to Stay in America

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Allan Sloan of Fortune magazine talks about the growing number of American companies reincorporating overseas in order to dodge US taxes. Filmmaker Michel Gondry tells us about his latest movie, “Mood Indigo,” and he’ll be joined by Audrey Tautou, who stars in it. Beth Macy with the story of how an American company struggled to compete with cheap furniture from China, and managed to keep manufacturing in Virginia, saving hundreds of jobs. We’ll look into why the population of great white sharks is rebounding off of the coast of New York and New Jersey. Plus, some Afghan and Iraqi interpreters who worked with the United States have been able to emigrate to this country, and we’ll find out why they’ve found little support here.  

The Leonard Lopate Show

Michel Gondry and Audrey Tautou on the Surreal Romance, “Mood Indigo”

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The French director and actress talk about their new film, based on Boris Vian's novel of the same name.

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Fishko Files

Last Tango

Thursday, July 17, 2014

In this archival edition of Fishko Files, WNYC’s Sara Fishko recalls one inflammatory  film of 1972, starring Marlon Brando, that was proclaimed a game-changer for movies.  Was it?  Here is the next Fishko Files...

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: Manipulating The Internet, The Darkest Material Known to Man, and A Dystopian Future

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

1. A British Spy Agency is Manipulating the Internet | 2. White House Introduces New Climate Measures | 3. Scientists Invent the World's Darkest Material | 4. The Takeaway Book Club: 'Sleep Donation'

The Leonard Lopate Show

Growing Good Eaters

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Dan Pashman, host of “The Sporkful,” and Hillary Frank, host of “The Longest Shortest Time,” share tips on what to feed kids and how to raise adventurous eaters. We’ll learn about the adventures of five Frenchmen who sought refuge in America during the French Revolution, and the ways they helped shape American history. Elizabeth Mitchell tells the story of the visionary French sculptor who designed the Statue of Liberty and brought it to New York. Plus, our word maven Patricia T. O’Conner talks about words from WWI and she answers listener questions about language and grammar!

The Takeaway

Nadine Gordimer's Impact on South African Writing

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Looking back on the life of Nobel Prize-winning novelist Nadine Gordimer, who died on Sunday at age 90, it's immediately apparent how much of a complete iconoclast she was in her lifetime. Her impact on future generations of writers in the country has been profound.

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Studio 360

Sideshow Podcast: How Animation Helps Us Appreciate Good Audio

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

The greatest interview ever recorded won’t get as many hits on YouTube as a cat giving a high five. The people behind Blank on Blank are using animation to make audio go viral.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: The Challenges of Symbolic and Tangible Change in Politics

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

1. The Obama Presidency: Too Little, Too Late For Minority Communities? | 2. The New High-Tech Political Tools Every Voter Should Know About | 3. Nadine Gordimer's Lasting Impact on South African Writing | 4. The Symbolism & Politics of Geraldine Ferraro

The Takeaway

Hemingway's Grandson Restores Never-Seen Elements to "The Sun Also Rises"

Monday, July 14, 2014

A new version of "The Sun Also Rises" includes lost chapters and extensive revisions, giving an altogether new portrait of Papa's creative process.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: An Escalating Conflict, The World Cup's Legacy, and A New Look at Hemingway

Monday, July 14, 2014

1. Tensions Between Israel & Hamas Escalate | 2. Benghazi, Citigroup, and The DOJ's Curious Timing | 3. Why Is It So Hard to Test for Lyme Disease? | 4. The Legacy of the 2014 World Cup | 5. Hemingway's Grandson Restores Never-Seen Elements to "The Sun Also Rises"

WNYC News

An Apartment Building That's a Gallery — for Now

Sunday, July 13, 2014

WNYC

There's a place in Harlem that is neither a museum nor a gallery —it's an affordable housing development. Yet right now, it is filled with two floors of art.

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WNYC News

Seeger Fest: A Time to Remember, a Time to Celebrate

Saturday, July 12, 2014

A farewell to Pete Seeger combines music and activism.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rob Reiner: ‘I Tell the Same Story Over and Over’

Friday, July 11, 2014

The comedy legend says his latest film, “And So It Goes,” shows that men and women act the same at every age.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

'Land Ho!' Searching for Lobster, Vodka, and Long-Legged Women in Iceland

Friday, July 11, 2014

The film's director and stars on how you can’t escape yourself, no matter how far you travel.

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The Takeaway

Listener Responses: The Childhood Event You Would Make a Movie About

Friday, July 11, 2014

This weekend, Richard Linklater's much talked about indie film "Boyhood" opens in theaters. The revolutionary movie, shot over twelve consecutive years, follows Mason, played by Ellar Coltrane, from the ages of 6 to 18. Moviegoers watch Ellar's transformation from a child to an adult in 160 minutes. We asked you, our listeners, to tell us what memorable scenes from you own childhood could be turned into a movie. Your responses truly have cinematic potential.

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Studio 360

The New Stars of Performance Art

Friday, July 11, 2014

Performance art is notoriously difficult to define — maybe that’s why celebrities find it so appealing when they’re trying to improve their artistic cred. Big names like James Franco, Shia LaBeouf, Jay Z, and Lady Gaga have all gotten into the act, and that rubs some struggling performance artists the wrong way.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

After 12 Years of Filming, an Entire Childhood on Screen

Friday, July 11, 2014

A conversation about ‘Boyhood’ with director Richard Linklater and star Ellar Coltrane, who grew from 6 to 18 over the course of filming. “It felt like the biggest decision I’d ever made, artistically,” Linklater said.

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Studio 360

Are Young People Losing Their Creative Edge?

Friday, July 11, 2014

Researchers have found creativity in decline among young people. A new study suggests that fiction by adolescents, in particular, has become less imaginative since the 1990s. What’s causing young folks to think more realistically? And should we brace for a wave of dull novels by millenials?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Screen Time: Rob Reiner and Richard Linklater

Friday, July 11, 2014

Rob Reiner talks about his latest romantic comedy, “And So It Goes.” Richard Linklater, director of “Boyhood,” and Ellar Coltrane, who stars in the film, talk about creating this film over the course of 12 years. We’ll talk to the director and stars of “Land Ho!” about a road trip that takes an elderly odd couple to Reykjavik. Plus, Please Explain is all about subletting, AirBNB, and the rules and rights of tenants.

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: U.S. Intelligence Official Kicked Out of Germany, Brazil's Loss Sets In, and United Nations says Central American Children are Refugees

Friday, July 11, 2014

United Nations: Central American Children are Refugees | U.S. Intelligence Official Kicked Out of Germany | Listener Responses: The Childhood Event You Would Make a Movie About | Brazil's World Cup Defeat: A National Trauma?