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Arizona

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Guns Don’t Kill People, Bullets Kill People

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Experience suggests there is little chance the attack will produce significant new legislation, let alone change a national culture that has been accepting of guns since its inception—unless we try something new and different.

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The Takeaway

Will Ariz. Shooting Spur New Gun Laws?

Friday, January 14, 2011

Saturday's shooting in Tucson has led gun control advocates to begin drafting bills to strenghten gun control laws. Meanwhile, gun sales have been up since the shooting. While the issue of gun control tends to come to the fore following tragedies of this sort, few actually think that any real legislative change will come in the wake of the shooting.

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The Takeaway

In the Wake of Tucson Tragedy, Reflecting on the Media's Role in Fueling Vitriol

Friday, January 14, 2011

This has been a week of difficult coverage on The Takeaway. The deadly shooting in Tucson left us grappling with difficult questions – not only about the victims and their families, but also about gun control, mental illness, political discourse, extremism, the media and free speech – questions that cut to the very heart of Americans values. What can we learn from the Arizona shooting? How should we reflect on this terrible tragedy?

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The Takeaway

During President's Visit, Tucson Begins Healing Process

Thursday, January 13, 2011

After a shooting spree over the weekend that left six people dead and a U.S. Congresswoman in critical condition, President Barack Obama flew to Tucson, Arizona on Wednesday to offer his condolences to the community. Obama spoke last night at service titled, "Together We Thrive: Tucson and America." Despite the occasion for grief, many at the rally seemed energized, in part by the news that during the president's visit to her hospital bed, Rep. Giffords (D-Ariz.) opened her eyes for the first time since the attack. It was estimated that more than 14,000 people were in attendance. 

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The Takeaway

From Hinckley to Loughner: The Insanity Defense

Thursday, January 13, 2011

In June 1982, John Hinckley, Jr. – President Reagan’s would-be assassin – was found not guilty by reason of insanity. The announcement sparked widespread public criticism, as many believed that the verdict, for all practical purposes, exonerated the man who tried to kill the president. Nearly thirty years later, it seems likely that Jared Loughner, the man charged with attempted assassination and murder after last weekend’s deadly shooting spree in Tucson, will also plead insanity in his case.

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The Takeaway

A Gun-Toting Congress?

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Tex.) is reportedly writing a bill that would allow congressmembers to carry concealed weapons in Washington D.C. Carrying a concealed weapon is currently illegal in D.C., but is not illegal for members of Congress on Capitol grounds. The news of this bill comes after twenty people were shot in Arizona over this past weekend, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who is still in the hospital recovering. Will more guns mean less senseless acts of violence? 


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The Takeaway

The Misinterpretation of Metaphors

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Back in March Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords made a statement responding to Sarah Palin's anti-healthcare reform campaign, saying, "we're on Sarah Palin's targeted list. But the thing is the way that she has it depicted has the cross hairs of a gun site over our district." Could metaphors in that statement have had an effect on who Jared Loughner targeted in Arizona over the weekend?

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The Takeaway

Sarah Palin Sparks Controversy with 'Blood Libel' Video

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Sarah Palin released a video today in response to criticism that her rhetoric might have had some role in Saturday's Tucson shooting. It's the first time that she's spoken out publicly since the tragedy and her choice of words is causing controversy: She accused pundits and journalists of "blood libel" in what she described as their rush to blame political rhetoric for the attack.

Does Sarah Palin have a point about the connection between rhetoric and an attack like this? How much do you think rhetoric is to blame?

Here's what Palin said:

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The Takeaway

Obama Offers Words of Comfort at Arizona Shooting Memorial

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Presidents throughout history have had to deliver speeches in the wake of tragedy to comfort the nation. Ronald Reagan did so after the Challenger explosion; Bill Clinton after the Oklahoma City bombing and Columbine shootings; and George W. Bush after 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and the Virginia Tech shootings. President Obama is set to deliver his own speech tonight in Arizona to try and comfort a nation following the shooting of twenty people, that left six dead. How will President Obama approach the events, and their political impliations, from the scene of the tragedy?

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Studio 360

Novelist's Loner Protagonist is All Too Real in Tucson

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Like the rest of the twitteratithe novelist Walter Kirn quickly tried to make sense of the Arizona shooting of Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and several others.

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It's A Free Country ®

Mad Mix of Mental Illness and Marijuana?

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

WNYC
There's a certain proportion of adolescents who are very susceptible to the affects of marijuana and if they abuse it before the age of 17 or 18, they're very likely to begin having persecutory ideas, paranoid ideas. They may have auditory and visual hallucinations. And they end up with a condition that looks for all the world like paranoid schizophrenia.

Dr. Michael Stone, Forensic Psychologist on The Brian Lehrer Show

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It's A Free Country ®

Tucson Shooting: The Continued Fallout

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

All of this bleeds into the mood, and the atmosphere in the country, the sense of urgency. It's the difference between having a debate and political philosophy, and constantly communicating to people, who are unstable and who are on the fringe or who feel deeply threatened and frustrated, that this is the armaggedon, and the fate of the Republic and the fate of our children rests on it. That kind of overheated rhetoric is on cable TV every night, the blogs of both ideologies every night. That kind of rhetoric inevitably leads people to see themselves as actors in a grand human historic drama, in a way that I think becomes closely linked to a tendency toward violence.

Matt Bai writer of the Political Times column for The New York Times, on The Brian Leher Show.

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The Takeaway

Tucson Update: Still Grappling With the Aftermath

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Yesterday a mostly quiet 22-year-old Jared Lee Loughner appeared in court and was charged with attempted assassination, murder, attempted murder, and other federal crimes. Meanwhile the community of Tucson, Ariz., continued to grapple with the aftermath in the media limelight. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D—Ariz.) remains in critical condition; her husband released a statement asking for the concerned to consider donating to The Red Cross. What debates and questions are unfolding in the place where the shooting occurred? 

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The Takeaway

Your Take on the Arizona Shooting

Monday, January 10, 2011

What if any changes should be made to gun purchasing requirements? Here's what you've been telling us by text message. Sign up for texts by sending the word START to 69866.

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The Takeaway

Is There a Link Between Violent Rhetoric and the Arizona Shooting?

Monday, January 10, 2011

Sarah Palin puts what looks like a target on a district in Arizona on her website. Her Tea Party opponent holds "Get on Target" campaign events and invites voters to "Help remove Gabrielle Giffords from office — shoot a fully automatic M16 with Jesse Kelly." A disturbed young man in Arizona attends an event with a congresswoman and opens fire with fully automatic Glock. Is there a direct connection between the savage rhetoric and the brutal attack?

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It's A Free Country ®

What The Tuscon Massacre Means For Washington

Monday, January 10, 2011

In this case it is at least legitimate to look at the possible connection between the surrounding political rhetoric and the act of a deranged and violent person.

James Fallows on The Brian Leher Show.

Comments [59]

The Takeaway

Who is Jared Loughner? Investigation Into Arizona Shooting Continues

Monday, January 10, 2011

As details from the investigation into the shooting of Congressman Gabrielle Giffords and 19 other people emerged this weekend, government at both state and national levels reacted with outrage, sorrow and confusion. Marc Lacey, reporter for The New York Times has the latest.

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The Takeaway

More Questions on Arizona Shooting of Rep. Giffords

Monday, January 10, 2011

This weekend's shootings in Tucson, Arizona left six dead and 14 injured. Democratic Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords — whom authorities say was the target of the attack — remains in critical condition, while a Congressional aide, a federal judge and a 9-year-old girl are among the dead. The violence was the worst the state has seen in sometime, and in its wake, members of Congress beefed up security detail, while some worried if more attacks were coming. Since then, 22-year-old Jared Lee Loughner has been charged with attempted assassination. The event appears to be an isolated act of violence, but many are wondering: how did this tragic shooting occur?

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The Takeaway

Addressing Gang Violence Through the Courts and on the Streets

Friday, November 12, 2010

For decades, cities across the country have tried a variety of approaches to reduce gang violence. Recently, Long Beach, California has implemented court-ordered civil injunctions, allowing law enforcement to arrest known gang members in particular neighborhoods for minor infractions. These infractions include wearing gang colors, carrying a cell phone in a car, or leaving the house after 8 p.m. Is it working? 

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It's A Free Country ®

Pop + Politics: 'The Border Will Always Be Porous'

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Our WNYC partner Pop + Politics has been traveling the country this fall to explore the stories and characters behind the political debates this campaign season. Across the southwest, one of this year's biggest election issues is illegal immigration and border security. When Arizona governor Jan Brewer signed SB 1070 in the spring, a bill that required local police officers to enforce federal immigration law, the state became the flash point for a national debate about how best to deal with undocumented immigrants. 

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