Streams

 

Architecture

On Being

[Unedited] Esther Sternberg with Krista Tippett

Thursday, October 24, 2013

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Architecture for Amateurs

Tuesday, October 08, 2013

Witold Rybczynski, emeritus professor of architecture at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of many books, including his latest How Architecture Works: A Humanist's Toolkit (Farrar, Straus and Giroux , 2013), offers a beginner's guide to architecture, including a "walk-through" of submissions to the competition for the National Museum of African-American history.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

AirBnB and the NY AG; SCOTUS; History of Government in Crisis

Tuesday, October 08, 2013

→ Tonight at 7pm: Comptroller Debate Live on WNYC. Stream and Listen Here.

The New York Attorney General has subpoenaed information about AirBnB hosts, according to the company. WNYC’s Charlie Herman explains what’s known about the request for information, and what it says about the company’s legal battles in New York City. Then, Mark Tushnet of Harvard previews the new Supreme Court term. Plus: we’ll hear about a decision from the Dominican Republic to strip citizenship from those born in the country to Haitian parents; an architecture professor explains humanism and the discipline; and a deep dive into the history of our government in crisis with Princeton University professor Julian Zelizer.

Studio 360

American Icons: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Friday, October 04, 2013

How do you memorialize a war that was more tragic than triumphant? Inscribed with the name of every fallen soldier, Maya Lin’s granite wall became a sacred place for veterans. 

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WNYC News

To See How New York Can Survive Flooding, Look to Hamburg

Friday, September 20, 2013

To get a good sense of a what a floodproof city can look like, check out Hafen City in Hamburg, Germany.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Power and Desire in Architecture

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Rowan Moore, former director of the Architecture Foundation, the architecture critic for The Observer, argues that hope, power, sex, and our changing relationship to the idea of home are the most powerful forces behind architecture. In Why We Build: Power and Desire in Architecture, he looks at notable projects, including the High Line, the island experiment of Dubai, the Covent Garden brothels of 18th-century London, and Daniel Libeskind’s failed design for the World Trade Center site.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Bloomberg's New York; an Instruction Manual for Life; Ben Zimmer on the word "Bubble"; Architecture Critic Rowan Moore

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

As the race for Mayor heats up, The New Yorker’s Ken Auletta looks back at 12 years of Michael Bloomberg and his legacy. Tom Shadyac, the director of the films “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” and “Patch Adams,” explains how a brush with death made him change the way he lives his life. Wall Street Journal language columnist Ben Zimmer on the word “bubble” and how it’s used on Wall Street. Rowan Moore, architecture critic for The Observer, talks about how our emotions are the most powerful force behind the design of buildings.

The Multimillion-Dollar Snafu Over $100 Bills

Saturday, August 17, 2013

The Federal Reserve has sent 30 million newly designed $100 bills back to the printing presses this week. The new notes are already more than two years past their original circulation date. Host Scott Simon speaks with author and journalist David Wolman to find out why.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Architect Hugh Hardy's Theater of Architecture

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Architect Hugh Hardy talks about his 50-year career and some of his favorite projects—the restored Radio City Music Hall and the revived New Victory and New Amsterdam theaters near Times Square and the state-of-the-art Botanical Research Institute of Texas in Fort Worth. His book Theater of Architecture gathers 20 projects from New York City and beyond, and discusses each project's challenges, strategies, and human concerns that influenced its design.

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For The Love Of Beer: How Empty Cans Made A House A Home

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

John Milkovisch's ambitions started out simple: build a place to enjoy a cold one. Throughout the 1960s and '70s, Milkovisch amassed thousands of empty beer cans, which he eventually put to use on his house in Houston.

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Your More/Less Ethnic-Sounding Name

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

We asked folks if they've ever changed their name to sound more or less ethnic. And we received some wonderful responses.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

How Design Can Change Your Health

Friday, July 19, 2013

Mayor Bloomberg is promoting a plan that encourages building designers to promote physical activity, like taking the stairs. Roger Duffy, partner at the architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, discusses what constitutes "active architecture" and how it can make a difference in peoples' lives.

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Transportation Nation

Mayor Bloomberg Says You're Not Using the Stairs Enough

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

WNYC

NYC Mayor Mike Bloomberg issued an executive order Wednesday requiring all new government facilities to be designed in a way that encourages physical activity, like taking the stairs. He wants to help the rest of the city do the same with new legislation and a new academic center. It's all part of a push to spread a philosophy called Active Design. 

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WNYC News

Whitney Museum Downtown Puts Art on the Terrace

Thursday, June 27, 2013

After two years of construction, the Whitney Museum of American Art is showing off its new downtown home. The edgy new building designed by Renzo Piano sits on Gansevoort Street between West Street and the High Line and overlooks the Hudson River. But how does it measure up to the museum's previous digs?

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Change Is On The Horizon For London's Famous Skyline

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

The city of London boasts centuries of architectural history. But a building boom is threatening the city's traditionally low-rise aesthetic and the views of some of that history. Critics — including UNESCO — are very worried about London's changing skyline.

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World's Shortest Business Brief: The Smoffice

Sunday, June 16, 2013

Contest results are in for the world's smallest office.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Design Utopia

Friday, June 14, 2013

Following up on the book Cradle to Cradle, William McDonough, American architect, founding principal of William McDonough & Partners and co-author with Michael Braungart of The Upcycle: Beyond Sustainability--Designing for Abundance (North Point Press, 2013), says we should aim higher than lessening the harm humans cause the planet and try to make things better.

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Post Recession, Architects Return To The Drawing Board

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

While some jobs are coming back in this economy, the market for many architects remains tough. There were nearly 220,000 people working in the field in 2008. Today, more than 25 percent of those jobs are gone.

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Transportation Nation

Behold What NYC's Penn Station Could Be: Four Visions

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

WNYC

Verdant spirals, heroic domes, river views and, of course, speedy trains: these are some of the possibilities imagined, and visualized in a challenge to redesign Penn Station. Have a look at what four top architecture firms dreamed up.

[UPDATE: See below for Madison Square Garden's none-to-pleased response to the renderings.]

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Life of the Law

An Architect’s Code

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

In its code of ethics, the American Institute of Architects requires members to “uphold human rights.” But what does that mean when it comes to prisons—specificially, those that confine inmates largely to their cells with little to do?

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