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Architecture

WNYC News

New Whitney: Come for the View, Stay for the Art

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Glass walls and four terraces facing the High Line park are some of the highlights of the new building designed by Renzo Piano. Two critics offer their reviews in this audio tour.

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99% Invisible

162- Mystery House

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

According to legend, Sarah Winchester's friends advised the grieving widow to seek the services of a Boston spiritual medium named Adam Koombs. The story goes, Koombs put Mrs. Winchester in touch with her deceased husband—but William had bad news. -

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All Things Considered

Teaching Students To Hear The Music In The Built World

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Cooper Union architecture professor Diana Agrest has influenced generations of accomplished architects. Agrest was one of the first women to teach in the largely male-dominated field.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Whitney's New Home

Monday, April 20, 2015

New York Magazine critics Jerry Saltz and Justin Davidson preview the new home of the Whitney Museum in Manhattan's meatpacking district.

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99% Invisible

160- Perfect Security

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

The pursuit of lock picking is as old as the lock, which is itself as old as civilization. - But in the entire history of the world, there was only one brief moment, lasting about 70 years, where you could put something under lock and key—a chest,

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Studio 360

Let Sleeping Giants Lie (on the Sides of Buildings)

Monday, April 13, 2015

New York may be the city that never sleeps, but there are giants slumbering on the buildings thanks to the art collective Dawn of Man. 
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Will New Zealand Rebuild The Cathedral My Forefather Erected?

Sunday, April 05, 2015

NPR's Philip Reeves recently visited the earthquake-battered cathedral in New Zealand built by a 19th-century ancestor. He found his family history entwined in a fierce contemporary controversy.

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Studio 360

The Pantheon: A Lesson in Designing With Light

Thursday, April 02, 2015

Steven Holl is one of America’s most respected architects. When he first went to Rome as a student, he discovered the building that would shape his career.

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99% Invisible

158- Sandhogs

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Eighty years ago, New York City needed another tunnel under the Hudson River. The Holland Tunnel and the George Washington Bridge could no longer handle the mounting traffic between New Jersey and Manhattan. Thus began construction of the Lincoln Tunnel.

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All Things Considered

Palm Springs Celebrates Its Past, And Tourists Arrive In Droves

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Palm Springs was the desert playground of golden-era Hollywood. Then its glamour faded. Now its midcentury architecture, its retro style and the allure of its past are fueling a rebirth.

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WNYC News

Architecture Treasures from Latin Mega-Cities

Saturday, March 28, 2015

 “The goal was to correct the fact I was taught nothing about Latin America with three degrees in architecture," said MoMA curator Barry Bergdoll about the new exhibition.

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WNYC News

Get Your Gargoyle On at Tribeca Auction

Thursday, March 26, 2015

WNYC
Thousands of historical artifacts from buildings in New York and other cities are up for grabs as a Tribeca showroom has to move to make way for more condos.

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99% Invisible

157- Devil’s Rope

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

In the mid 1800s, not many (non-native) Americans had ever been west of the Mississippi. When Frederick Law Olmstead visited the west in the 1850s, he remarked that the plains looked like a sea of grasses that moved  “in swells after a great storm.

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Morning Edition

With Sunny, Modern Homes, Joseph Eichler Built The Suburbs In Style

Monday, March 16, 2015

The developer was known for well-crafted tract homes that dotted California suburbs after World War II. "The architecture really does inform the way you live," says Eichler homeowner Adriene Biondo.

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WNYC News

Architect Michael Graves Transformed Ordinary Architecture and Objects

Friday, March 13, 2015

His colleague, architect Peter Eisenman, called Graves "the consummate artist." 

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All Things Considered

Michael Graves, Renowned Architect Who Designed Products For Target, Dies

Friday, March 13, 2015

Renowned architect and industrial designer Michael Graves has died at the age of 80. Graves is perhaps, best-known for designing household objects for Target.

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Architect Michael Graves Dies At 80

Thursday, March 12, 2015

He was celebrated for designing everything from grand hotels to teapots. Graves died at his home in Princeton, N.J., of natural causes, his firm said.

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All Things Considered

From Stadiums To Shelters: Remembering Pritzker Winner Frei Otto

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

German architect Frei Otto has been named the 2015 winner of the Pritzker Architecture Prize. The announcement was moved up from March 23, because Otto died on Monday at the age of 89.

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A Day After His Death, Frei Otto Awarded Pritzker Architecture Prize

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

The prize's jury, in its citation, said the German architect had developed "a most sensitive architecture that has influenced countless others throughout the world." Otto died Monday. He was 89.

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All Things Considered

Museum Asks Visitors To Listen To New York's Buildings

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Iconic architecture, long a subject for academics and designers, is being explored with sound in a new exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York.

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