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Archaeology

The Takeaway

The Brontosaurus Is Back!

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

The debate is over, and paleontologists have confirmed it: The Brontosaurus is both a distinct genus and species. Welcome back, thunder lizard.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Digging Up Ancient Artifacts, Human Remains, Lost Civilizations

Friday, November 07, 2014

For this week’s Please Explain we'll find out about the field of archaeology.

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On The Media

Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, May 02, 2014

A hundred years ago, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. In an interview from December of last year, Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Protecting Egyptian Antiquities from Looting

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

For centuries, Egyptian archaeological sites have been looted–most recently to feed the black market trade of antiquities. Egyptian archaeologist Dr. Monica Hanna talks about the looting situation in Egypt, which has grown more pressing since the 2011 uprising. She’s used social media informed people about the problem and to enabled the return of stolen objects. Dr. Hanna is the recipient of the 2014 SAFE Beacon Award from the nonprofit SAFE/Saving Antiquities for Everyone.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dueling Dinosaurs

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Matthew Carrano, Curator of Dinosauria at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History, discusses the dueling dinosaur fossils that were discovered in Montana in 2006, by commercial prospectors on a privately owned land. They’ll be auctioned and are expected to fetch possibly of the highest price ever paid for dinosaur fossils, which excludes museums from acquiring them. He’ll also look at  how fossils are acquired by museums and collectors.

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On The Media

Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, July 05, 2013

A hundred years ago, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. In an interview from December of last year, Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery." 

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ancient Nubia African Kingdom on the Nile

Friday, February 15, 2013

Photographer Chester Higgins talks about new discoveries about ancient Nubia, its remarkable history, architecture, and culture, and legacy. Only a handful of archaeologists have studied Nubia’s history or unearthed the cities, temples, and cemeteries that once dotted the landscape of southern Egypt and northern Sudan. Its remote setting in the midst of an inhospitable desert, with access by river blocked by impassable rapids, has lent it not only an air of mystery, but also isolated it from exploration. Higgins’ photographs appear in the book Ancient Nubia African Kingdom on the Nile.

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On The Media

Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, December 14, 2012

A hundred years ago this week, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery." 

Califone - Lunar H

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The Takeaway

African Pottery Gives Hints of the Earliest Dairy Farmers

Thursday, June 21, 2012

When did earliest humans make cheese? Butter? Yogurt? New archeological findings suggest humans were in fact processing milk 7,000 years ago. Researchers examining pottery from from a site in Libya recently discovered traces of dairy fats on the earthenware.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Unseen Titanic

Monday, April 09, 2012

Hampton Sides, author of the article “Unseen Titanic,” in National Geographic’s April issue, and Dr. James Delgado, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) archaeologist who was part of an expedition down to the Titanic, discuss the new technologies that have revealed the most complete—and most intimate—images of the famous wreck.

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On The Media

The Multiple Personalities of National Geographic

Friday, March 30, 2012

Last month, the NatGeo channel unveiled "Diggers," a show about treasure hunters with metal detectors that the Society for American Archaeology said glorifies looting. "Diggers" is only one of a slew of pulp non-fiction shows on the NatGeo Channel that would surprise anyone familiar with the more-then-century-old National Geographic Magazine. Bob speaks to SAA president Fred Limp, National Geographic Society CEO John Fahey, and NatGeo Channel CEO David Lyle.

 

Oddisee - All Along The River

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The Takeaway

Did Stone Age Europeans Settle in America 20,000 Years Ago?

Friday, March 02, 2012

It’s the standing belief among most archaeologists that North America remained unpopulated until about 15,000 years ago, when Siberian people traveling over an Asian land-bridge traveled into Alaska and then moved down the West Coast. But in recent years, a series of surprising archeological finds at five sites along the Delaware, Maryland and Virginia coast offered evidence of a different possibility. Prehistoric blades found on the Eastern Shore of Virginia and in Tilghman Island, Maryland, appear to closely match those used by stone age Europeans known as the Solutreans.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rediscovering Machu Picchu

Monday, June 20, 2011

Mark Adams describes the discovery of Machu Picchu and his own investigation into allegations that the Yale professor who discovered the ruins, Hiram Bingham III, was not the hero he’s made out to be. Turn Right at Machu Picchu: Rediscovering the Lost City One Step at a Time retraces Adams’s journey to Machu Picchu, with a crusty, antisocial Australian survivalist and several Quechua-speaking, coca-chewing mule tenders as his guides. The book will be released June 30.

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The Takeaway

Caveman Love, Caveman Thought

Thursday, August 05, 2010

Most of us think of the word “neandertal” as an insult. We use it to describe someone who’s backward or not so smart. And why wouldn’t we? After all, our ancestral caveman cousins lacked intelligence and managed to go extinct while we, the modern humans, survived and thrived.

At least, that’s what we’ve always told ourselves. But maybe we’ve been wrong.

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Studio 360

Above Picardy

Saturday, November 29, 2003

Picardy, Northern France, has long been famous for a towering gothic cathedral in Amiens, and for the battlefield of the Somme. But in recent years the area has also become known for the traces of history buried beneath its soil. The photographer Roger Agache told Marjorie ...

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Studio 360

Snake Goddess

Saturday, July 20, 2002

The archaeological discovery of an ancient Greek civilization turns out to be, at least partially, a mistake. Kurt Andersen talks with scholar Kenneth Lapatin about the mystery of the Snake Goddess. 

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