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Archaelogy

The Leonard Lopate Show

What New DNA Analysis Reveals about Inbreeding among Ancient Humans

Thursday, December 05, 2013

Researchers recently analyzed bones that date back more than 300,000 years that were found in Spain. Wall Street Journal science writer Robert Lee Hotz explains why the DNA in those bones reveals that inbreeding among ancient humans was more widespread than scientists had previously thought. 

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The Takeaway

Archaeological Dig Uncovers Nation's Oldest Black Community

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

A team of scholars from the University of Maryland and Morgan State University have discovered what appears to be the oldest, independent community of free blacks in the U.S. Mark Leone is a professor of anthropology at the University of Maryland, who’s been heading the dig of “The Hill,” in the backyard of a building that dates back to the 1790s.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Our Missing Ancestor

Monday, July 08, 2013

Jamie Shreeve, National Geographic magazine’s executive editor for science talks about why DNA from a skeleton found in a cave in Russia adds a mysterious new member to the human family. His latest article, “The Case of the Missing Ancestor,” is in the July issue of National Geographic.


 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code

Thursday, June 13, 2013

New York Times reporter Margalit Fox tells a real-life intellectual detective story about how an ancient language on tablets unearthed in Crete was deciphered. In The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code, she paints portraits of three pivotal figures. English archeologist Arthur Evans who discovered a cache of ancient tablets; Michael Ventris, the brilliant amateur who deciphered the script but met with a sudden, mysterious death; and Alice Kober, the unsung heroine of the story whose painstaking work allowed Ventris to crack the code.

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Radiolab

Help Rewrite History

Thursday, June 06, 2013

In Detective Stories, Jad digs into an ancient trash heap that has reshaped our understanding of history. Now, you can help decode more secrets -- by transcribing scraps of papyrus.
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The Takeaway

British Archaeologists May Have Found a Lost King

Monday, September 17, 2012

Last week British archaeologists announced they’d found what appeared to be the remains of Richard III. The bones were discovered in a parking lot in the city of Leicester just more than a dozen miles from Bosworth Field, where Richard III became the last English king to die in battle.

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The Takeaway

Archeologists' Major Discovery at Site of Civil War Prison

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Just months before the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, archeologists in Georgia have discovered the location of a stockade used for Camp Lawton, a Confederate prison camp which housed Union prisoners of war.

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The Takeaway

European Mummies Found in China, and New Discoveries on the Origin of Dogs

Friday, March 19, 2010

A story published this week reports that Chinese archaeologists have found nearly-intact mummies of people who lived in a desolate desert in Northwestern China nearly 4,000 years ago. But they were not Chinese. DNA evidence from these long dead people shows that they were in fact of European descent. Also this week, geneticists announced that man's best friend split from the wolves about 15,000 years ago in the Middle East.

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The Takeaway

Continent's smallest meat-eating dinosaur discovered!

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

When you think of dinosaurs, what comes to mind? Hulking creature? Gargantuan teeth? What about something the size of a small house cat? In a story that everyone's inner child will love, researchers in Canada have found North America's smallest carnivorous dinosaur. Paleontologist Nick Longrich joins The Takeaway to talk dinos and break down what the continent's ecosystem looked like millions of years ago.

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