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Arab World

The Leonard Lopate Show

The New Museum Showcases Art from the Arab World

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

The first museum-wide exhibition in New York City to feature contemporary art from and about the Arab world.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The World Through Arab Eyes

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Political scientist Shibley Telhami analyzes the driving forces and emotions of the Arab uprisings and looks ahead to the next phase of Arab politics.  In The World Through Arab Eyes, Telhami gives an account of Arab identity, revealing how Arabs’ present-day priorities and grievances have been gestating for decades. Many Arabs may have a wounded sense of national pride, but they also have a desire for political systems with elements of Western democracies. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Forces Behind the Arab Spring; Changes in Hollywood; Rufus Wainwright on Kate McGarrigle's Life and Music; Matt Taibbi

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Join guest host Richard Hake on tomorrow’s show when he speaks to political scientist Shibley Telhami about the driving forces behind the Arab Spring. Veteran Hollywood producer Lynda Obst looks at the major transformation in the movie business over the last decade. Director Lian Lunson talks about her documentary “Sing the Songs That Say I Love You: A Concert for Kate McGarrigle,” along with Rufus Wainwright. And Rolling Stone contributing editor Matt Taibbi explains what new documents reveal about the role that the rating agencies played in the 2008 financial meltdown.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

As political change sweeps the streets and squares, the parliaments and presidential palaces of the Arab world, Shereen El Feki has been looking at an upheaval a little closer to home—in the sexual lives of men and women in Egypt and across the region. Her book Sex and the Citadel: Intimate life in a Changing Arab World examines how sex is highly sensitive and still largely secret aspect of Arab society. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Coach Bob Knight, Sex in the Arab World, "Old Hats"

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

We'll find how attitudes toward sex are shifting in the Arab World. Bill Irwin and David Shiner talk about their new show, "Old Hats." Ruth Ozeki talks about her new novel, The Tale for the Time Being. And legendary basketball coach Bob Knight talks about his career and explains the power of negative thinking.

The Leonard Lopate Show

"Two Revolutions" in Egypt

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Wendell Steavenson talks about the paradoxical transition for Egypt’s women after Mubarak’s fall. In her article “Two Revolutions” is in the November 12 issue of The New Yorker, she writes that  women protested alongside in Tahrir Square, yet, “so far, the revolution has not advanced the cause of women and may even endanger it.” There are worries that the Islamist political parties that have dominated the political sphere since the revolution could curb women’s freedoms in an already conservative society.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Hidden History of the Libyan Revolution

Thursday, November 08, 2012

Ethan Chorin, longtime Middle East scholar and one of the first American diplomats posted to Libya after the lifting of international sanctions, discusses the Libyan uprising. His book Exit the Colonel: The Hidden History of the Libyan Revolution is based upon extensive interviews with senior US, EU, and Libyan officials, and with rebels and loyalists; a deep reading of local and international media; and significant on-the-ground experience pre- and post-revolution.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Uprising in Syria

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Journalist Stephen Starr discusses the state of Syria over the past five decades, and looks at the roots of the ongoing the civil war there. He explains why Syria, with its numerous sects and religious diversity, has been so prone to violence and civil instability in Revolt in Syria: Eye-witness to the Uprising, and investigates what kind of resolution Syrians hope for.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Fawaz Gerges on the Rise and Fall of Al-Qaeda

Friday, September 16, 2011

Fawaz Gerges gives a history of al-Qaeda, showing its emergence from the disintegrating local jihadist movements of the mid-1990s-not just the Afghan resistance of the 1980s. In The Rise and Fall of Al-Qaeda, he reveals that transnational jihad has attracted only a small minority within the Arab world and possesses no viable social and popular base. He also describes how the democratic revolutions that swept the Middle East in early 2011 show that al-Qaeda has no influence over Arabs' political life. Gerges argues that the West has become trapped in a "terrorism narrative," but that Al-Qaeda is no longer a serious threat.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Roads to Freedom: The Latest from Syria

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

New Yorker contributor Wendell Steavenson assesses the mood of the Syrian people in the midst of the protests and crackdowns that have been taking place over the last five months. “Roads to Freedom” is an account of her recent trip to Damascus, which is in near-lockdown—and displays abandoned tourist sites, secret police in casual clothing milling around many of the squares, and anti-regime protests.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Reappearing Act: Saif al-Islam Gadhafi

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Initial reports from Tripoli indicated that rebel forces had captured Mummar Gadhafi's son Saif, a defiant spokesman for the regime who was also educated in the West. Then, early Tuesday morning he reappeared at a luxury hotel in Tripoli flashing victory signs for supporters and the press. Philippe Sands talks about how complicit Saif Gadhafi was his father’s brutal crackdown this year.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Parallels Between Gadhafi and Hussein

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

New York Times reporter John Burns discusses the parallels between Moammar Gadhafi and Iraq's former leader Saddam Hussein, and what their similarities mean for the future of Libya.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Continuing Unrest in Yemen

Thursday, August 18, 2011

As a brutal crackdown on protesters continues in Syria, the unrest in Yemen has slipped from the headlines. On today’s Backstory, Fawaz Gerges, a professor of Middle Eastern Politics and International Relations at the London School of Economics, describes what’s happened in the drought-stricken, poor country over the last few weeks, including the formation of a national council by those opposed to President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Developments in Syria

Thursday, August 04, 2011

On Wednesday, the United Nations Security Council issued a statement, condemning the violent government crackdown in Syria. Blake Hounshell, managing editor of Foreign Policy, discusses the situation in Syria, where shelling continues in the city of Hama, and the impact of the Security Council’s statement, and why Lebanon refused to sign on to it.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Generation Freedom

Monday, July 18, 2011

Bruce Feiler talks about the historic youth uprisings sweeping the Middle East and what they mean for the future of peace, coexistence, and relations with the West. His new book Generation Freedom, offers a portrait of history in the making—he marches with the daring young organizers in Liberation Square, confronts the head of the Muslim Brotherhood, and witnesses the dramatic rebuilding of a church at a time when sectarian violence threatens peace.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Egypt Update

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Daniel Brumberg, Senior Adviser at the United States Institute of Peace and co-director of the Democracy and Governance Center at Georgetown, gives us an update on the ongoing political turmoil in Egypt as the country tries to transition to democracy.

Egypt Update

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Friendship, Murder, and the Search for Truth in the Arab World

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Joseph Braude discusses his time embedded with a hardened unit of detectives in Casablanca who handle everything from busting al-Qaeda cells to solving homicides. The Honored Dead: A Story of Friendship, Murder, and the Search for Truth in the Arab World tells the story of a seemingly commonplace murder of a young guard at a warehouse. Braude’s pursuit of the truth behind the murder takes him from cosmopolitan Marrakesh to the Berber heartland, from the homes of the wealthiest and most powerful people in the country to the backstreets of Casablanca.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Oman

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Oman is a Gulf country we usually hear very little about, despite its strategically important location in the region and its great oil wealth. Joe Stork, deputy Middle East director at Human Rights Watch, tells us about the country, its ruler Sultan Qaboos bin Said Al Said, and the harsh crackdowns on dissent there.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Saudi Arabia and the Arab Spring

Thursday, June 09, 2011

As countries across the Arab World have been protesting in the streets and overthrowing decades-old regimes, Saudi Arabia has been trying to prevent the spread of unrest within its own borders. On today’s first Backstory, New York Times United Nations Bureau Chief Neil MacFarquhar explains how the Saudi royal family has spent billions of dollars to try to keep its people happy – and how well their efforts have paid off. He’s also the author of The Media Relations Department of Hizbollah Wishes You a Happy Birthday.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Update on the Protests across the Arab World

Thursday, June 02, 2011

Protests have turned violent across the Arab World. Foreign Policy managing editor Blake Hounshell gives us an update on the clashes between the police and protesters in Syria, Yemen, and Bahrain. Plus, we’ll take a look at the role that sectarianism is playing in those countries and in Egypt.

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