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Arab Spring

The Takeaway

Reporter Goes Undercover in Syria

Friday, October 28, 2011

Ramita Navai is a reporter who spent two weeks undercover in Syria. She tells The Takeaway about her experience and she's also the star of the upcoming Frontline documentary "Syria Undercover." Today the New York Times is reporting that Turkey is sheltering members of the Free Syrian Army, an armed opposition group attempting to bring down the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. The group has been staging attacks inside Syria and plotting those same attacks from a camp that is being actively guarded by the Turkish military. Turkey says it is protecting the group out of humanitarian concern, but the move underscores the changing political landscape of the region.

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The Takeaway

An Islamist Victory in Tunisia and the Fate of the Arab Spring

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Tunisia's moderate Islamist Ennahda party appears to be the clear victor of Sunday's election, winning about a 40 percent plurality of the vote. In the first democratic election in the nation that ignited the Arab Spring, 90 percent of Tunisians took to the polls to vote on a r a 217 member assembly that will draft a new constitution and appoint a new caretaker government. An Islamist victory in secular Tunisia could point to a trend in the region. Islamists are poised to make electoral gains in Egypt, and have been dominate in post-Gadhafi Libya.

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The Takeaway

Tunisia Holds Its First Free Elections

Monday, October 24, 2011

Many months after a man in Tunisia set himself on fire to protest his country's lack of a viable democratic government, some 90 percent of eligible voters in the country cast their votes on Sunday. Over 4.1 million people cast their ballots in the first democratic election from the nation that ignited the Arab Spring. Early signs show that the once banned Islamist Ennahda party is leading, possibly indicating a shift for the secular nation.

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The Takeaway

The Death of Gadhafi and The Arab Spring

Friday, October 21, 2011

It’s been ten months since the series of revolutions and protests known as the Arab Spring sprung out across the region. It began in Tunis, the capital of Tunisia. Tunisians go to the polls this Sunday in the first democratic elections of the Arab Spring. How will the developments in Libya may affect the entire region, particularly the elections in Tunis and then Egypt?

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It's A Free Country ®

The End of Gadhafi?

Thursday, October 20, 2011

The question is now – can Libya make good on the promise of the insurgency?

—  Benjamin Barberpolitical theorist and Distinguished Senior Fellow at the policy center Demos, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

The Foreign Policy Implications of Gadhafi's Death

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Col. Moammar Gadhafi was killed this morning in his birthplace of Sirte as forces of the National Transitional Council swept the city, according to the leader of the Tripoli military council. The reports have not been confirmed outside of the NTC. Martin Indyk, former U.S ambassador to Israel, and director of the Foreign Policy Institute at the Brookings Institution, comments on how Gadhafi's reported death will shake up international relations in the region.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

NPR's Deb Amos on Syria and the Arab Spring

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Having just wrapped up a reporting trip to Syria, Deborah Amos, who covers the Middle East for NPR, reflects on the trip and also on the latest news from Egypt after the revolution there.

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The Takeaway

More Violence Reported in Homs, Syria

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

More deadly clashes have been reported in Homs, Syria's third largest city and a center of the anti-government movement calling for the ouster of President Bashar al-Assad. At least 21 people were killed as army forces raided the city. Estimates by the United Nations say over 3,000 Syrians have been killed during the civil unrest since the beginning of the year. Sue Lloyd-Roberts, correspondent for the BBC, went to Homs and saw the brutality first hand. The names of the interviewees in her report have been changed to protect their identities.

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The Takeaway

Yemeni President Will Not Step Down

Monday, October 10, 2011

Faced with intense opposition from both politicians and angry protesters who have spent months demanding his ouster, Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh raised eyebrows on Saturday with a vaguely worded pledge to step down "in the coming days." By the following day, it appeared his words were hollow when Yemeni officials announced that Saleh would stay in power until elections scheduled for next year.

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The Takeaway

Ambassador Robert Ford on Syrian Opposition

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

The United Nations Security Council is likely to vote this week on a resolution condemning Syria's violent crackdown on those opposed to the government of Bashar al-Assad. Among the chorus of international voices speaking out against the Assad government is the United States' ambassador to Syria, Robert Ford. Ambassador Ford spoke to Lyse Doucet of the BBC about the Syrian opposition.

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The Takeaway

What's Next for the Occupy Wall Street Movement?

Monday, October 03, 2011

The Occupy Wall Street protests have been gaining momentum since they began in downtown Manhattan two weeks ago. More than a few pundits have noted the leaderless movement is using Arab Spring-style tactics as their inspiration. Like the protests in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Occupy Wall Street supporters are extremely adept at using social media to spread their message. Their camp in the Financial District's Zuccotti Park is impressively organized, with a reception area, media zone, medical clinic, library and cafeteria. But despite structure on the ground, one criticism that’s been repeatedly levied at them is their lack of unified demands. The protesters want to end greed and corruption but don’t necessarily agree as to what that means in practice. 

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It's A Free Country ®

What Occupy Wall Street Says About Protesting in America

Thursday, September 29, 2011

I think the reason we’re seeing such… populist anger, really, expressed on both the Right and the Left, is that people see that... they understand that. And where I don’t think we have a national consensus is okay, what’s the answer?

Chrystia Freeland, global editor-at-large of Thomson Reuters, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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WNYC News

With Hope and Fear, Libyan Students Meet New Leaders in New York

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

WNYC

Along the blocks surrounding United Nations headquarters, there have been plenty of sour faces the past week – angry protesters and frustrated neighbors trying to weave through the blue barricades. But the faces of one group of visitors to the UN were full of joy: Libyans.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Arab Spring at this Fall's General Assembly

Monday, September 26, 2011

United Nations bureau chief for The New York Times, Neil MacFarquhar, talks about how representatives from countries affected by the Arab Spring are being received at the U.N. this week, and how the Palestine bid for statehood overshadowed that wave at the General Assembly this year.

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The Takeaway

Baha'i Scholars Await Trial in Iran

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Eight members of the Bahai'i religious minority are awaiting trial in Iran, after organizing the Baha'i Institute for Education, a place where dismissed professors teach Baha'i youth as volunteers. The Iranian government recognizes the Baha'i community as a political organization, rather than a religious group, and declared the center illegal.

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The Takeaway

Red Cross Officials Visit Syrian Prison

Thursday, September 08, 2011

Tens of thousands of people, including women and children, are believed to have been detained by Syria in the last five months since the popular revolt against the regime of President Bashar al-Assad. Human rights groups say that at least 88 people have died while under detention, and the BBC reports that some 2,200 people have died around the country since the protests began. The International Committee of the Red Cross was permitted to visit a Syrian prison for the first time this week, after months of requests to the Assad government.

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The Takeaway

Should the War on Terror End?

Wednesday, September 07, 2011

On September 11, 2001, terrorists hijacked four planes, flying two into the Wold Trade Center towers and one into the Pentagon. The day will forever be known simply as 9/11. Ten years later, America has become involved in two overseas wars, the assassination of Osama bin Laden, and the spread of revolution through the Arab world. Is it time to finally end the "War on Terror"?

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The Takeaway

Inside Syria, Where Few Journalists Are Allowed

Friday, September 02, 2011

Mohammed Adnan al-Bakkour, the attorney general of the central province of Hama in Syria, appeared in a video announcing his resignation on Wednesday in protest of government brutality. But the Syrian government denies al-Bakkour's claims and refuses to accept his resignation, saying he was kidnapped and forced to give the statement. Bloody uprisings started more than five months ago in Syria and Amnesty International says ten times more people have been killed in Syria than Libya. So why aren't we hearing more about it?

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The Takeaway

Gadhafi Still Missing, Libya Moves On

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Libyan rebel leaders have rejected the prospect of having United Nations peacekeepers aid in the transition to a new government, according to top UN officials. The rebels also continue to search for Moammar Gadhafi, as Gadhafi's wife and three children fled to Algeria yesterday. The rebels are also facing growing pressure to provide basic services to the Libyan people, like water and electricity, in advance of actually organizing a transitional government.

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The Takeaway

Libya Faces Steep Humanitarian Challenges

Thursday, August 25, 2011

The manhunt for Moammar Gadhafi continues and Libyan rebels continue to clash with loyalist forces. Libyan rebels are offering a $2 million bounty for Moammar Gadhafi, as they move to take full control of Libya. But remember why the US and NATO went into Libya. The mandate was humanitarian; the goal to protect Libyan civilians. They couldn't have reached this point, without aid from the U.S. and NATO, whose forces were originally in Libya for humanitarian purposes, to protect civilians. Is their situation the same now?

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