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Arab Spring

It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Mohammad and the 1st Amendment: Crying Fire in the 21st Century

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Can American ideals of free speech rooted in the First Amendment co-exist with the reverence for the Prophet Mohammad rooted in Islam?

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The Takeaway

How Riots Abroad Affect Muslims at Home

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

As protests in the Muslim world continue, many Americans are becoming disillusioned with our involvement in the region. But what does that mean for Muslim Americans, here at home? Answering that question is Hussein Rashid, professor of religion at Hofstra University. 

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The Takeaway

Anti-American Unrest Continues in the Middle East

Monday, September 17, 2012

After the eruption of anti-American sentiment across the Middle East and the death of the U.S. ambassador to Libya, American policymakers and citizens might be thinking twice about our involvement in post-Arab Spring countries. But it is precisely because of this violence and unrest that Shadi Hamid thinks the United States should remain involved in the region.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Did Obama Lose Interest in the Arab Spring?

Monday, September 17, 2012

Serious questions remain as to whether, after the overthrow of dictatorships, the U.S. failed to aggressively follow-up to help in the building of civil, security, economic, and political institutions in these countries.

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The Takeaway

Flashpoints in the Post-Arab Spring World

Friday, September 14, 2012

Eleven years after September 11th, the relationship between the United States and the Islamic world is, in many ways, fraught with tension. The recent attack on the U.S. embassy in Libya left four Americans dead, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. Nicholas Kristof, columnist for The New York Times, helps put this latest moment of protest and religious furor into historical context.

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The Takeaway

Sinai: What It Meant Then, What It Means Now

Thursday, August 09, 2012

There's more trouble unfolding this week in Egypt, as its newly elected president, Mohamed Morsi, confronts violence in the Sinai Peninsula. Sixteen Egyptian soldiers were killed Sunday by shooters, and on Tuesday night, gunmen fired on up to seven government checkpoints in what appears to be a carefully planned attack.

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The Takeaway

Uncertainty Looms in Syria

Thursday, July 19, 2012

In Syria, uncertainty about the future of the country looms after bomb blasts in Damascus reportedly killed at least three members of Syrian President Bashar al Assad's inner circle yesterday. From Cairo to Washington, officials expressed confidence that this latest violence will have repercussions.

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The Takeaway

Mubarak "Clinically Dead"

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Back in February 2011, when Egyptians were protesting daily in Tahrir Square, we spoke with Omar Khalifa, a resident of Cairo and the director of O Media. He was skeptical about the revolution and felt the people of his country were rushing into something they weren’t prepared for. We check back in with Khalifa after Egyptian media yesterday reported that former president Hosni Mubarak suffered a stroke Tuesday and is "clinically dead."

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The Takeaway

What Would Mubarak's Death Mean for Egypt?

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

The health of Hosni Mubarak has injected a new uncertainty into the political and constitutional crisis in Egypt. Nancy Yousef joins us to discuss what the former president’s death would mean for Egypt and the legacy he would leave behind. Nancy is an Egyptian American and a professor at CUNY Baruch in New York.

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The Takeaway

Syria Arm Sales Cools Russia US Relations

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Earlier this week, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton accused Russia of providing helicopters to assist the Assad regime. Is Putin fighting the last battle of the Cold War in Syria?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

21st Century Dictatorships

Tuesday, June 05, 2012

William Dobson, politics and foreign affairs editor at Slate and the author of The Dictator's Learning Curve: Inside the Global Battle for Democracy, looks at how both world dictatorships and their opponents are adapting to technological advances.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's Youth and Today's Historic Presidential Election

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

History will be made in Egypt today and the country’s political future will be determined. Egyptians are heading to the polls to elect a new president after an extraordinary 15 months that saw revolution, violence, and upheaval. Noel King, a freelance journalist in Egypt, joins to talk about the country's youth vote.

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The Takeaway

Ethan Bronner Reflects on the Changing Middle East

Monday, May 07, 2012

Ethan Bronner is a correspondent for our partner The New York Times. He recently announced that he would transition from his role as the paper's Jerusalem Bureau Chief to become a national legal correspondent in New York. The Middle East has changed radically since Bronner accepted the Bureau Chief position in early 2008. Perhaps most visible are the results of the Arab Spring uprisings throughout the region. Bronner reflects on the immense changes in the Middle East since he started reporting there four years ago.

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The Takeaway

Myanmar Moves Toward Democracy

Monday, April 02, 2012

Over the weekend, pro-democracy activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi was elected to Myanmar’s parliament in a landmark vote. It’s a historic moment for the country; after years of house arrest, Suu Kyi appears poised to finally step into a role of real power. What's the best way to build a real democracy? Do events in Myanmar offer a model for democratic transitions elsewhere? Suzanne DiMaggio is Vice President for global policy programs at the Asia Society. Robert Lieber is professor of government and international affairs at Georgetown University.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Unfinished Arab Revolutions

Monday, March 26, 2012

Marc Lynch, a.k.a. @AbuAardvark, professor and director of the Institute for Middle East Studies at George Washington University, editor of the Middle East channel at Foreign Policy, and senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, talks about his new book, The Arab Uprising: The Unfinished Revolutions of the New Middle East.

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The Takeaway

Syrian Opposition Leader on Country's Future, One Year after Protests Began

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Today is the one-year anniversary of the protest movement in Syria. While the Arab Spring brought regime change to Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has retained his grip on power. Syrian forces loyal to President Assad have stepped up attacks across the country. Yesterday, government forces began raiding Dara'a, the city where the uprising against the president began. In the last year, Syrian forces have killed more than 8,000 people, according to the United Nations. The international community can’t seem to agree on a solution, and the opposition movement is fractured. What's ahead for Syria?

 

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The Takeaway

Shelling of Homs Continues in Syria

Thursday, February 23, 2012

President Bashar al-Assad's army is mercilessly shelling the city of Homs for the 20th day in a row in Syria. And there are signs of escalation in violence across the country. Activists say Syrian troops are using helicopter gunships to strafe mountain villages where anti-regime rebels could be hiding. There are also reports of Syrian forces now staging vicious door-to-door raids in Damascus. Joining the program is Jim Muir, correspondent for our partner the BBC.

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The Takeaway

Journalist Marie Colvin Killed in Syria

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

American journalist Marie Colvin has reportedly been killed in Syria along with Rémi Ochlik of France. Colvin wore a black eye patch after she lost an eye to shrapnel while reporting from Sri Lanka in 2001. But that didn't stop from venturing back into Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, to cover the uprising of the Arab people. That's what eventually took her to Homs in Syria, where she lost her life. Yesterday, she filed her last dispatch from the embattled city.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Al Jazeera Revolution

Thursday, February 16, 2012

Marwan Bishara, senior political analyst for Al Jazeera English, host of Empire, the monthly show about global powers, and author of The Invisible Arab: The Promise and Peril of the Arab Revolutions, counters the perception of the "Arab Spring" as a spontaneous uprising.

EVENT: "The Invisible Arab", a discussion with Marwan Bishara of Al Jazeera, hosted by the Middle East Institute at Columbia University, takes place this evening, Thursday, February 16th from 6pm-8pm. Registration is required and doors open at 5:30pm. To register, click here.

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The Takeaway

Women's Rights in Libya One Year After the Revolution

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

After Ben-Ali fled Tunisia, and Mubarak ran from Egypt, the Libyan revolution began in Benghazi and then traveled east, to Tripoli. After an intense civil war bolstered by international support, Moammar Gadhafi’s 40-year reign finally ended last October in his hometown of Sirte. As Libyans celebrate the anniversary of their revolution, the state of their government is still in flux, and the role of women in Libyan civic life is particularly uncertain.

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