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Arab World

PRI's The World

A ‘fearless’ American writer is freed from captivity in Syria

Monday, August 25, 2014

Peter Theo Curtis, an American writer held for nearly two years by an al-Qaeda affiliate, has been released from captivity in Syria. The news came as immense relief to his family and friends, particularly after the reason execution of another American journalist in Syria last week.

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The Takeaway

Qatar's New Role in the Libyan Conflict

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Qatar has sent fighter jets by way of Greece in order to back allied forces in the military action to enforce a U.N. mandated no-fly zone over Libyan air space. It is the first Arab nation to provide military support to the coalition effort and a reminder that Qatar is an economic and political force in the region. The small peninsular country has garnered considerable influence throughout the world by creating key and conflicting allies while managing to attract investment from the West. It's site of the 2022 World Cup, and home to the Al Jazeera news network, which has been instrumental in reporting the wave of change happening in the Middle East.

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The Takeaway

Yemeni Protesters Get New Support

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

It's been over a month since protesters took to the streets of Sanaa, Yemen's capital city, calling for the removal of President Ali Abdullah Saleh. Opposition parties have joined the demonstrations and have said they would reject any offer from Saleh to form a unity government. Protesters also received support from Sheikh Abdul-Majid al-Zindani, who the U.S. believes has links to al-Qaida, and has called for an Islamic state to replace Yemen's current government.

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The Takeaway

Egypt's Elections: Who Will Run?

Monday, February 14, 2011

Egypt’s military has dissolved Parliament and called for elections in six months, as it oversees the country’s democratic transition from three decades of authoritarian rule. The next president of Egypt will likely come out of the military, says Ret. Col. Patrick Lang, former head of Middle East Intelligence at the Defence Intelligence Agency. 

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The Takeaway

After Egypt, Protests Ripple Throughout the Region

Monday, February 14, 2011

A ripple of activism is spreading across the Middle East, following Egypt’s popular uprising that ended three decades of authoritarian rule. Iran’s opposition rallied in Tehran despite a government ban, and the Palestinian cabinet resigned Monday. What does this change mean for the United States' role in the Mideast? William Yong, reporter for The New York Times is in Tehran, where he's been watching the protests.

A democratic ripple is spreading across the Middle East, following Egypt’s transition from three decades of authoritarian rule.

Overnight, Iran’s
opposition rallied in Tehran despite a government ban, while there are reports that the Palestinian cabinet will resign, following protests.

The popular uprisings could transcend regional borders, and spur democratic change in others parts of the world, such as Latin America.

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The Takeaway

As Protests Continue in Egypt, a Look at Democracy in Southeast Asia

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

It’s day 16 of protests in Egypt and demonstrators say they won’t let up until President Hosni Mubarak steps down. Ultimately, the activists on the streets are demanding free and fair elections and a commitment to a democratic government. We’ve talked in depth about the intersection of democracy and Islam in the Middle East, and the challenges of trying to blend the two ideals. But in Southeast Asia, Muslim nations like Indonesia and Malaysia have relatively successful democracies. What makes democracy in those populous Muslim countries work?

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The Takeaway

Arab-Americans Reflect on Week of Protests

Friday, February 04, 2011

Political demonstrations have swept across the Middle East this week, with protestors taking to the streets in Egypt, Yemen and Syria. In Yemen, the protests was hailed as the "day of rage;" in Syria it's being called the "day of anger;" and today in Egypt, protesters are calling for a "day of departure."

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The Takeaway

Amid Political Turmoil in Arab World, Yemen's President Pledges to Step Down in 2013

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Following massive protests in Egypt and Tunisia, longtime president of Yemen, Ali Abdullah Saleh, announced he would not seek re-election in 2013. He also pledged that he his son would not be his successor. The concessions come ahead of planned anti-government protests in Yemen today.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Egypt on the Brink

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

On Wednesday, as events continued to unfold across Egypt, Leonard spoke to Tarek Osman about what’s happened in Egypt over the last 55 years, since the rise of Gamal Abdul Nasser.

While Osman, the author of Egypt on the Brink: From Nasser to Mubarak, saw the roots of today’s events as going all the way back to Napoleon, he described great changes in the last 60 years:  

"If you look at 1950, the midpoint of the 20th Century at Egypt and try to speculate how this country would look 50 or 60 years down the line…most speculators, most strategic thinkers would have imagined an Egypt that is very different from Egypt today. Today, Egypt is very conservative; at that time it was very liberal. At that time, in the 50’s, it was very nationalist. Today it’s very sectarian oriented. It was very cosmopolitan. Today it’s not cosmopolitan. At that time, Egypt was a worldly city – even in terms of social glamor. Today, it’s certainly far from that.”

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The Takeaway

Reflecting on March of Millions

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

In what is being dubbed the "March of Millions," hundreds of thousands of Egyptians have taken to the streets in the eighth day of protests against President Hosni Mubarak. Demonstrations have vowed to remain on the streets until Mubarak, who has held his position for more than 30 years, quits. Protests are taking place in Tahrir Square, which translates to Liberation Square.

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The Takeaway

Egypt Takes Stock After Major Protests

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Protests erupted in the streets of Cairo and other major Egyptian cities yesterday, calling for the ousting of the 30-year rule of President Hosni Mubarak. Protesters are hoping to share the same success protestors in Tunisia saw in recent weeks, but that may prove to be more difficult dealing with the Egyptian government and military which are much larger and stronger. Emad Shahin, Henry R. Luce associate professor of religion, conflict and peace building at the University of Notre Dame, analyzes these protests and the Egyptian government.

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