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Anti Terrorism

WNYC News

MTA Anti-Terror Efforts Have Been Slow And Costly, Says Comptroller

Monday, March 07, 2011

WNYC

New York’s mass transit system remains "inherently vulnerable" to terrorist attacks, New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli charges in a new report.

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Transportation Nation

NY State Comptroller: MTA Late, Over-Budget on Anti-Terror Projects

Monday, March 07, 2011

Security monitors in the Essex St station on the J/M/Z subway lines. (Photo by Amy Groark - Flckr / Creative Commons)

(New York, NY - Jim O'Grady, WNYC) New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli says in a new report that New York's mass transit system remains "inherently vulnerable" to terrorist attacks.  The report criticizes the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority for falling behind and going over-budget on projects to reinforce bridges, tunnels and train stations--and add electronic surveillance and ventilation systems to the subway.

DiNapoli said the work is four years behind schedule and 44% over-budget, with an expected final price tab of $851 million dollars. He also pointed out that the authority had planned to have the first phase of its security upgrades completed by 2008; that date has now been pushed back to 2012.

The report did credit the NYC MTA for picking up the pace of construction over the past two years. For example, the authority says it has added 1,400 security cameras in the past year alone, with 600 feeding directly into the New York Police Department’s command center.

NYC MTA's response to the report said, "We have increased the number of security personnel, hardened our system, and work remains on track to complete remaining projects within the current budget."

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Transportation Nation

MTA "Terror-Proofing" Bridges and Tunnels

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Manhattan Bridge, New York City. Image: (CC) by Flickr user barry.pousman

(New York — Jim O’Grady, WNYC) The MTA is coming to the end of a $250 million project to “terror-proof” seven bridges spanning the East River and ten subway tunnels passing under it, reports The New York Post. The hardening includes lining tunnels with high-impact metal, dropping massive slabs of rock and concrete on the riverbed where tunnels have not been dug through bedrock, and fitting bridges with blast-resistant plates and collars on cables.

MTA spokesman Kevin Ortiz confirmed that the hardening was not a routine upgrade but “related to increasing security in the system.” He said the budget came from “a combination” of sources, including the MTA, the Department of Homeland Security and federal stimulus money.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is urging municipalities across the country to adopt New York City's security saying: "If you see something, say something."

Asked about other security projects in New York City, he said the agency continues to add surveillance cameras and police patrols at river crossings. The slow roll out of cameras are a sore point with the agency. In 2005, MTA hired Lockheed Martin to install 1,750 advanced technology cameras throughout the subway that could detect unattended bags on platforms. The technology didn't work. Now MTA and Lockheed are arguing in court over the $251 million price tag.

Ortiz also said the Department of Homeland Security has officially adopted New York City’s “If you see something, say something” campaign. The department is urging municipalities around the U.S. to use the saying in their outreach to the public.

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