Streams

 

Anthropology

The Takeaway

Kafka, Orwell, & the Prophetic World of 'Satin Island'

Friday, March 20, 2015

Experimental novelist Tom McCarthy's latest book is called "Satin Island," and it centers around a "corporate anthropologist" named "U."  

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The Takeaway

Understanding The Origins of Terrorism

Monday, January 26, 2015

What draws people to terrorism? One anthropologist, Scott Atran, went into the field to try to find out. 

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The Takeaway

What's Lost When a Language Dies

Friday, January 23, 2015

Half of the world's 6,000 languages will be extinct in the next 50 years. We explore what's lost when a language dies.

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Money Talking

An Anthropologist Walks Into a Bar in Silicon Valley

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Software engineers and venture capitalists aren't the only ones interested in technology. Turns out anthropologists are finding their way to Silicon Valley, too. 

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On Being

Scott Atran — Hopes and Dreams in a World of Fear [remix]

Thursday, October 16, 2014

For over a decade, the French-American anthropologist Scott Atran has been exploring the human dynamics of what we analyze as “breeding grounds for terrorism”...

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On Being

[Unedited] Scott Atran with Krista Tippett

Thursday, October 16, 2014

For over a decade, the French-American anthropologist Scott Atran has been exploring the human dynamics of what we analyze as “breeding grounds for terrorism”...

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99% Invisible

131- Genesis Object

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

In the beginning, there was design. Before any other human discipline, even before the dawn of mankind its self, design was a practice passed down from generation to generation of early humans. Today, everything that has been designed–space ships,

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Leader of American Anthropology Launches WNYC Series

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

American scientists and intellectuals in the fight against fascism before World War II.

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Radiolab

Why Cry?

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

Ever wonder why humans cry? A professor of behavioral neurology answers some questions, and helps give us a better understanding of how a feeling in our guts can come out as water in our eyes.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Lost Tribes of the Amazon

Tuesday, March 05, 2013

Ethnobotanist Mark Plotkin, founder of the Amazon Conservation Team, talks about the “uncontacted,” isolated groups living deep in the South American forest resist the ways of the modern world. He's featured in the article “The Lost Tribes of the Amazon,” by Joshua Hammer, in the March issue of Smithsonian magazine.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Using Anthropology to Understand Consumers

Friday, February 22, 2013

Graeme Wood discusses how companies have started using social scientists to probe the deepest needs, fears, and desires of consumers. He’s joined by Min Lieskovsky, who specializes in ethnographic research. Graeme Wood’s article “Anthropology Inc.” is in the March 2013 issue of The Atlantic.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The New World

Monday, January 07, 2013

What can citizens of our modern world learn from traditional societies? Author Jared Diamond discusses that question, which he explores in his latest book. Plus: City Comptroller John Liu on his State of the City address; a preview of the 113th Congress and Washington's Sandy aid package; sexual assault protests in New Delhi; and a new book explains how to think like Sherlock Holmes.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Occupy's Strike Debt Effort

Thursday, November 15, 2012

David Graeber, an American anthropologist at Goldsmiths College, University of London, and author of DEBT: The first 5,000 years discusses the Strike Debt Rolling Jubilee-- the Occupy movement's effort to abolish debt and offer a bailout for the 99%.

There's a fundraiser tonight at Le Poisson Rouge. Info here.

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The Takeaway

Did Stone Age Europeans Settle in America 20,000 Years Ago?

Friday, March 02, 2012

It’s the standing belief among most archaeologists that North America remained unpopulated until about 15,000 years ago, when Siberian people traveling over an Asian land-bridge traveled into Alaska and then moved down the West Coast. But in recent years, a series of surprising archeological finds at five sites along the Delaware, Maryland and Virginia coast offered evidence of a different possibility. Prehistoric blades found on the Eastern Shore of Virginia and in Tilghman Island, Maryland, appear to closely match those used by stone age Europeans known as the Solutreans.

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The Takeaway

New Initiative Preserves Rare and Endangered Languages

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

At present, there are nearly 7,000 languages being spoken worldwide. However, due to ageing populations and globalization's English-only emphasis, a language dies out every 14 days. At this rate, nearly half the world's languages will vanish in 100 years. Very often, these languages are lost without any record: no clues about pronunciation, let alone grammar or vocabulary. 

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The Takeaway

The Premiere of The Global Jukebox

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Twenty years ago American folklorist and ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax designed "The Global Jukebox," a database that used descriptive tools to identify and link archival music and dance footage. The Global Jukebox was essentially Pandora — but conceived long before technology that could realize it existed. Ten years after his death, Lomax's dream may finally be realized: all of his recordings have been put online, but it will take at least another year to get his collection of dance film into the database.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

WNYC and the Land of Mu

Friday, January 13, 2012

A cult classic airs on WNYC.
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The Brian Lehrer Show

DEBT: The First 5,000 Years

Monday, September 05, 2011

Anthropologist David Graeber, reader in social anthropology at Goldsmiths College, University of London, talks about his new  book, DEBT: The First 5,000 Years, and proposes a radical debt forgiveness scheme

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The Brian Lehrer Show

DEBT: The First 5,000 Years

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Anthropologist David Graeber, reader in social anthropology at Goldsmiths College, University of London, talks about his new  book, DEBT: The First 5,000 Years, and proposes a radical debt forgiveness scheme

Comments [9]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Not-So-Modern Society

Thursday, March 10, 2011

Robin Fox, professor of social theory at Rutgers University, anthropologist, poet, essayist, and the author of The Tribal Imagination: Civilization and the Savage Mind, analyzes how human social history, including tribalism, continues to affect societies.

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