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Anonymous

On The Media

Anonymous Distances Itself From Member Who Doxed The Wrong Cop

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Hacker collective Anonymous is distancing itself from a member who posted the name of the wrong police officer in connection with the shooting of Michael Brown.
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On The Media

Anonymous Claims They've Identified the Police Officer Who Shot Michael Brown. What Should We Do With That Information? (UPDATED)

Thursday, August 14, 2014

The Ferguson Police Department initially promised to make public the name of the officer who killed 18-year old Michael Brown, and then reneged, citing concerns for the officers safety. 

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On The Media

The British Government DDOS'd Anonymous, and I Don't Think It's a Big Deal (UPDATED)

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Update: Journalist Quinn Norton strongly disagreed with me on Twitter, so I asked her to write something about why she disagreed. I have attached her response to the bottom of the article.

One of the favorite tools of the internet hacker/troll collective Anonymous is the denial of service attack, or DDOS. Basically it works by flooding a site with so many queries that it becomes overwhelmed, and the rest of the internet can't access it. I've compared it in the past to the online equivalent of a sit-in - when deployed correctly, it disrupts business but causes no lasting damage.

According to the latest Snowden leaks, British authorities were using the same disruption methods against Anonymous that Anonymous was using against other parts of the internet.

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On The Media

Anonymous Plans a Million Mask March

Monday, November 04, 2013

Tomorrow is Anonymous’s Million Mask March. It’s designed as a global series of multi-city demonstrations, although it’s not clear what’s being demonstrated.

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On The Media

The Pros and Cons of Internet Vigilante Justice

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Well that didn't take long. 

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On The Media

Anonymous Arrives In Maryville

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

On Sunday, the Kansas City Star published a story about a horrific rape in Maryville, Missouri. 

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On The Media

The Strange Case of Barrett Brown

Friday, September 13, 2013

Barrett Brown is a journalist and activist who has been in jail for a year awaiting trial on a number of charges - chief among them copying and pasting a link to leaked documents into an IRC chat room. Ed Pilkington of The Guardian talks to Bob about Brown's case, and the implications it has for other journalists.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists

Friday, November 23, 2012

Forbes journalist Andy Greenberg traces the history of the activists trying to free the world’s institutional secrets, from the cryptography revolution of the 1970s to Wikileaks’ founding hacker Julian Assange, Anonymous, and beyond. In This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information, he explains how hackers access private files of government agencies and corporations, bringing on a new age of whistle blowing.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Activist Hackers

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Forbes journalist Andy Greenberg traces the history of the activists trying to free the world’s institutional secrets, from the cryptography revolution of the 1970s to Wikileaks’ founding hacker Julian Assange, Anonymous, and beyond. In This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Cypherpunks, and Hacktivists Aim to Free the World's Information, he explains how hackers access private files of government agencies and corporations, bringing on a new age of whistle blowing.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec and Anonymous

Friday, June 08, 2012

Parmy Olson talks about her investigation into the hacker collectives Anonymous and LulzSec, and she tells the full story of the global cyber insurgency movement, and its implications for the future of computer security. We Are Anonymous: Inside the Hacker World of LulzSec, Anonymous, and the Global Cyber Insurgency is an account of how a loosely assembled group of hackers across the globe pulled off digital assaults, tortured and eluded the feds, and how some hackers were eventually brought down.

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The Takeaway

NSA Declares 'Anonymous' a Threat to National Security

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

In Anonymous's move away from denial of service attacks and toward real-world interactions — such as recent threats against the Los Zetas Cartel — the hacktivists have attracted the attention of the National Security Agency. In private meetings at the White House, NSA director General Keith Alexander warned that in a year or two the group could attack the energy grid and shut off power for millions. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory Update: Anonymous

Thursday, February 16, 2012

Journalist Quinn Norton, contributor to Wired magazine's Threat Level blog, returns to give us an update on what the Internet collective Anonymous has been up to recently.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Anonymous

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Quinn Norton, a contributor to Wired magazine’s Threat Level blog, talks about the online collective Anonymous.

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It's A Free Blog

Iowa GOP Ups Protection Against Hacker Attack

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

The Iowa Republican Party is increasing security of the electronic systems it will use next week to count the votes from presidential caucusegoers. Law enforcement and cyber security geeks are also on high alert following a threat from a group of hackers delivered via video. 

"The video claims to be ...

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: US Mayors Want Fully Funded Transpo Bill, Toll Hikes Send Staten Islanders Flocking to E-ZPass

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Top stories on TN:

MTA unveils iPad-like informational kiosk at some subway stations. (Link)

Audi is using fraying infrastructure and stupid drivers to sell cars. (Link)

Some NYC parking meters are experiencing second lives as bike racks. (Link)

An aeroponic garden at Chicago's O'Hare Airport

A group of U.S. mayors met with congressional leaders and White House officials to push for a "comprehensive, fully-funded" transportation bill. (The Hill)

New York City's Department of Environmental Protection is investigating a transit-disrupting water main break on Manhattan's Upper West Side. (WNYC)

Bus vs. train: which system does more to help a city? The answer: it depends. (TheStreet)

After this weekend's toll hikes went into effect, Staten Islanders are lining up to buy E-ZPass. (Staten Island Advance)

The pedestrian safety officer program on three East River bridges is costing NYC $80,000 a month. (NY Daily News)

San Francisco BART protesters have gone from wild to mild. (SFist)

St. Paul (MN) businesses, which have been struggling during the Central Corridor light rail construction, may get a financial boost thanks to the project meeting a key deadline. (Minnesota Public Radio)

Chicago's O'Hare Airport now has a no-soil, vertical garden that grows everything from Swiss Chard to green beans, right between Terminals 2 and 3 on Concourse G. (Marketplace)

The Long Island town of Ronkonkoma is seeking a developer for a 50-acre mixed-use hub that would "create new businesses and jobs, expand the property tax base, keep young people from leaving Long Island, encourage the use of mass transit, and create a regional destination." (Newsday)

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Transportation Nation

BART Protests Round Three: Fewer Disruptions, Clearer Message, But Still No Turning Point

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Police block fare gates at Embarcadero station (photo by Casey Miner/KALW)

(San Francisco – KALW) Last night's protests against BART police, now in their third week, caused far less disruption than the previous two demonstrations. In its place was what one might call dialogue – at least in isolated pockets.

As promised, a small groups of demonstrators took up posts outside Civic Center station just before 5pm, some wearing their signature Guy Fawkes masks, others kneeling on the ground writing signs with Sharpies.

By 5:30 the demonstration had become a march down Market Street towards the other downtown BART stations. Meanwhile, at Civic Center, several demonstrators lingered to debate with counterprotesters supporting BART police.

Counterdemonstrator Geoff Hodgins (photo by Casey Miner/KALW)

One, Geoff Hodgins, held a sign that read: "Don't want to be shot? Don't attack police with a deadly weapon!" He said he'd thrown a sign together at the last minute and would debate people until it fell apart. Another, Kurt Wagner, said he was a former member of the military and challenged a demonstrator on whether she had "ever had to wear a uniform." He said he respected the BART police's need to make quick decisions. The demonstrator, Rupa Marya, was Charles Hill's doctor at San Francisco General Hospital. "I wear a different kind of uniform," she told Wagner. "I'm on the other end of those guns."

Throughout the evening, demonstrators for the most part kept the focus on the issue of police brutality – the protests' original premise. Prior to the demonstration, organizers with Anonymous had issued a statement telling their members to stay on message, in no uncertain terms. "Stay put, stop randomly marching around, and pick a target," was the headline of one section. Another read: "Ideological inconsistency will ultimately do more harm than good, even if the conflicting voices are individually beneficial. To sway people to our cause we must win in the court of public opinion, and to conduct ourselves in such an erratic manner does little in this regard."

The statement was an acknowledgment that even a big and decentralized group -- as Anonymous prides itself on being -- cannot necessarily succeed without leadership. Demonstrator Ryan Bell said he didn't see that as a bad thing. "When someone gets a hold of a megaphone and starts going off about the Federal Reserve and the Illuminati, well – that's not what today's protest is about." Bell said he wanted to see more accountability from BART police, and for them to be stripped of their guns. "They can't be trusted with them," he said.

As the demonstration continued, long rows of armed police flanked demonstrators up and down Market Street and into and out of downtown BART stations, which remained open to commuters. Both police and demonstrators made their most dramatic showing at Embarcadero station around 6:15PM -- a yelling match and short scuffle that resulted in the night's only two arrests.

A demonstrator is arrested for trespassing (photo by Casey Miner/KALW)

The protest was winding down by 7 and ended by 8, a development which, the San Francisco Chronicle noted, permitted "a massive police and media contingent to disperse as well."

Until next Monday, that is.

 

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Transportation Nation

Dozens Arrested in Latest BART Protest

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

(San Francisco – KALW) BART and San Francisco city police arrested at least 45 people Monday night, as well as briefly detained several journalists, in the latest protest against the Bay Area's transit officers.

BART officials began warning customers over the weekend of a possible commute-hour disruption, and police were out in force in downtown stations well before the anticipated 5 p.m. start time. This is the third such protest since the July 6 officer shooting of Charles Blair Hill, a homeless man who allegedly threatened BART police with a knife.

"I’m not against the police department per se," said a demonstrator on the Civic Center platform who identified herself as Lady Katey. "There are some times, some situations, where people are violent and dangerous. But I’m into better cops with morals and values who don’t just shoot people. I’ve been mentally deranged and drunk hanging out in Civic Center, not saying the nicest things, but I didn’t get gunned down for it. We’re here in fear."

Another demonstrator, who gave his name as Jabar, said he takes BART regularly for work but disapproved of the agency's actions. "It just keeps happening," he said of the police shootings. "They're not investigating themselves, and the person they brought in to do the independent investigation works all the time with police." He was referring to Mark Smith, the agency's new independent police auditor, who also worked in police oversight in Chicago and LA.

Like last week's demonstration, this was organized mostly online by cyberactivist group Anonymous. In the past week members of the group have also targeted BART's website, posting customer information and personal addresses of BART police officers on public websites. Those actions, in addition to the regular commute disruptions, had many commuters fed up.

"Ever since Oscar Grant I’ve always been on their side, I’ve always completely understood what they’re fighting for," said one woman of the protesters. The woman who gave only her first name, Esther said, "I feel like I would have even have joined in. But the fact that they’re ruining everyone’s transportation, it's not helping anything. If anything I think it's a step back for them."

Tension began building inside Civic Center station shortly after 5 p.m., as isolated protesters found themselves surrounded by police in riot gear and even more media. Police responded to raised voices and yelling as disruptions, arresting four people before declaring an unlawful assembly and clearing the station just before 5:30 p.m. Civic Center and Powell stations were closed intermittently throughout the evening as the demonstration turned into a march going up and down Market Street. BART police and demonstrators engaged in repeated shouting matches, in particular over the issue of whether shouting is allowed.

"How come you get a megaphone and we don't?" demanded one demonstrator.

Asked about this later, BART deputy police chief Dan Hartwig reiterated BART's official position that demonstrations on train platforms are a safety hazard. "That platform is not designed for anything besides waiting for public transportation," he said. "We have free areas throughout our system that any demonstration, any protest is welcome to exercise their first amendment right."

Hartwig also defended his officers' use of megaphones. "We utilized the megaphone to read a disperal notice and only to read a dispersal notice," he said. "We’re there for the right reasons. We’re the police officers, the peace officers, within this system. So if we choose to utilize that megaphone it’ll be for the right reason, and that’s what we did today."

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

What's a Hacker Anyway?

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

We hear from Douglas Rushkoff, media theorist and author of, most recently, Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Age, on News of the World, Anonymous, and just what "hacking" is in 2011?

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Studio 360

360 Exclusive: Hot on the Trail of "Anonymous"

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Anyone else feeling a little political déjà vu?  Fifteen years ago a salacious political novel called Primary Colors offered a thinly veiled account of President Bill Clinton’s election campaign and was written by…well, no one knew. Primary Colors was a huge success and turned into a movie.  Now, as if on cue, we get O: a Presidential Novel, a juicy speculative account of President Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign written by another “Anonymous” author.

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The Takeaway

Is 'O: A Presidential Novel' Any Good?

Monday, January 24, 2011

It’s likely you’ve heard about “O: A Presidential Novel.” The book is a fictional account of the Obama administration — the author, according to the publisher's website — "has been in the room with Obama and wishes to remain anonymous.” But buzz or no buzz, is “O” any good? Does it reveal anything juicy about Obama? And how is it similar or different from other fictional depictions of real, living presidents and administrations? Patrik Henry Bass, senior editor at Essence Magazine reviews the book.

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