Streams

 

Anniversaries

The Takeaway

Your Stories from Eight Years in Afghanistan

Friday, October 09, 2009

As we've been marking the eighth anniversary of the war in Afghanistan, we've found that people can think about the war in vastly different ways, depending on how close they are. We hear from those who've served, those who see the soldiers return, and even those for whom the war is far from their minds.

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The Takeaway

Are You Ready to Enter 'The Twilight Zone'?

Friday, October 02, 2009

"The Twilight Zone" turns 50 years old today, and we take a look back through the episodes that made this one of the most influential television series – science-fiction or otherwise – in history. With Rod Serling's distinctive narration alongside mysterious plot lines that made the hairs stand up on viewers' necks, the series was and remains in a class of its own. Are you ready to enter ... the Twilight Zone?

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The Takeaway

The Kindness of Strangers: Stories from 9/11

Friday, September 11, 2009

Thousands of people have stories about September 11th, eight years ago. For many of us these are stories that hang on the profound consequences of one life intersecting with another. Today we take a look at two of these stories, where the significance of a perfect stranger grows more pronounced with each passing year. We speak with Sarah Bunting. She’s a writer and publisher of the blog tomatonation.com. We also talk to Jim Dwyer, reporter for the New York Times and author of "102 Minutes: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers," which he co-wrote with New York Times editor Kevin Flynn.

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The Takeaway

One Year On: Banks After the Bailout

Thursday, September 10, 2009

All week we are reviewing the year that was — the year that marked the beginning of the financial meltdown and the recession that we continue to live through. Today we’re taking stock of how the nation’s banks are managing, one year after the government spent billions of taxpayers' dollars to bail them out. For a look at what regulations need to be in place to avoid future financial disasters, we talk with Eliot Spitzer. He was New York's attorney general before being elected governor; he first made a name for himself for keeping an eagle eye on the banking industry. We are also joined by Tyler Cowen, professor of economics at George Mason University and author of the new book, Create Your Own Economy: The Path to Prosperity in a Disordered World. (click through for the interview transcript.)

"Look, let’s be very clear. The Fed failed. Everyone says the Fed has saved us by printing trillions of dollars. The Fed is the very institution that was supposed to be monitoring this along with the Treasury Department. They utterly failed to do it."
—Former Attorney General of New York Eliot Spitzer

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The Takeaway

One Year On: The Fall of Lehman Brothers

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

All week long we are reviewing the year that was: the year that marked the beginning of the financial meltdown and the recession that we continue to live through. Today we are focusing on the $600 billion collapse of Lehman Brothers — the largest bankruptcy filing in U.S. history. It’s a moment that many believe sent the global economy into crisis. To get a sense of the forces leading up to that day we speak with a Lehman Brothers’ insider, former vice president of distressed debt and convertible securities at Lehman Brothers, Lawrence McDonald. He's the author of the new book, A Colossal Failure of Common Sense: The Inside Story of the Collapse of Lehman Brothers.

We also talk to our contributor Louise Story, finance reporter for the New York Times, about the collapse of Lehmann and the ensuing global financial crisis. Louise also tells us about the new spate of corporate mergers that could indicate the nation's economy is making the slow turn towards recovery.

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The Takeaway

The Sounds of the Financial Crisis

Monday, September 07, 2009

The first of the major bank bailouts happened one year ago today. We listen to what the financial crisis sounded like as it happened — immediately before and immediately after.

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The Takeaway

Rebooting the NAACP for the 21st Century

Friday, July 17, 2009

Yesterday the NAACP wrapped up its Centennial Convention. The Takeaway has been covering the convention all week, from DJ Spooky’s artistic take on the African-America experience to President Obama’s address last night. Today, as part of the “after the party” conversation, we are joined by John McWhorter to look at the relevance of the 100-year old institution and the challenges it faces in taking on 21st century discrimination. John McWhorter is a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and Adjunct Professor at Columbia, his latest book is Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold Story of English.

 

"The funding that Barack Obama is giving to community colleges, that is race-targeted legislation in its way. And I think that's wonderful. And I think we lose sight of that if, say, the NAACP continues to focus on discrimination as the main meal."
—John McWhorter on President Obama's address to the NAACP

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The Takeaway

Obama and WWII Veterans, Remembering D-Day

Friday, June 05, 2009

Ceremonies are being held in Normandy today to mark the 65th Anniversary of D-Day. American, British and French veterans will attend a number of events; President Obama will attend a ceremony on Saturday with French President Sarkozy and Britain's Prince Charles. Joining The Takeaway from Normandy Beach is the BBC’s Defense Correspondent Rob Watson to talk about the commemoration.

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The Takeaway

The gun control debate ten years after Columbine

Monday, April 20, 2009

Today marks the 10-year anniversary of the shooting at Columbine High School. On April 20, 1999, teenagers Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold opened fire on their classmates, killing a teacher and 12 students, and wounding 24 others before turning the guns on themselves. This month also marks the second anniversary of the Virginia Tech massacre, where 32 people were fatally shot by a mentally unstable student in the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. Commemorating these attacks against the backdrop of another shooting at an immigration center in Binghamton, New York, begs the question: “How bad does it have to get before we take serious steps toward gun control?” Joining us to try to answer this question is Jeff Fagan. Jeff Fagan is a professor of Law and Public Health at Columbia Law School

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Arts

Celebrating 60 Years of WNYC-FM in 2003

Tuesday, March 11, 2003

What were the first FM programs? For answers, read on…

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