Streams

 

Ann Southam

New Sounds

New Music for Piano

Monday, March 09, 2015

Hear piano music from Canadian pianist/composer Heather Schmidt, as well as Canadian composer Ann Southam. Plus, some of Anton Batagov's alleged Letters of Sergei Rachmaninoff & more.

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New Sounds

New Music for Piano

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Hear new music for piano on this New Sounds program, including music from Canadian pianist/composer Heather Schmidt, as well as Canadian composer Ann Southam.   From Schmidt's solo piano album of her own works called "Nebula,", listen to the title track.  Also, hear music by George Crumb, along with Anton Batagov's alleged Letters of Sergei Rachmaninoff, music from Hauschka, and more.  

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New Sounds

Post-Minimalist Music

Saturday, August 03, 2013

Philip Glass’s piano works have had a longstanding and widespread influence – on the so-called Post-minimalist composers, but also on musicians working in the electronic dance world.  One of them is Francesco Tristano, who brings electronica’s repeating motifs back to the piano in his solo piece “The Melody.”  We’ll hear that, as well as several of William Duckworth’s “Time Curve Preludes,” often considered the first major Post-minimalist work, and a work from the late Canadian composer Ann Southam directly inspired by Glass’s piano works.

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Q2 Music Album of the Week

Ann Southam's Beautiful and Unsettling Subtleties

Monday, May 20, 2013

The pianist Eve Egoyan performs five haunting piano solos by the late Canadian composer Ann Southam. Stream the full album this week. 

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The New Canon

Passing Beyond

Monday, April 22, 2013

This week’s episode of the New Canon features pianist Eve Egoyan's world premiere recordings of posthumous by Ann Southam, and music for brass by Andrew Rindfleisch. We also hear from our album of the week—a cycle of Schubert-inspired songs by David Lang that features performances by Shara Worden and Bryce Dessner.

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New Sounds

Post-Minimalist Music

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Philip Glass’s piano works have had a longstanding and widespread influence – on the so-called Post-minimalist composers, but also on musicians working in the electronic dance world.  One of them is Francesco Tristano, who brings electronica’s repeating motifs back to the piano in his solo piece “The Melody.”  We’ll hear that, as well as several of William Duckworth’s “Time Curve Preludes,” often considered the first major Post-minimalist work, and a work from the late Canadian composer Ann Southam directly inspired by Glass’s piano works.

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New Sounds

Post-Minimalist Music (Special Podcast)

Friday, June 24, 2011

WNYC

Philip Glass’s piano works have had a longstanding and widespread influence – on the so-called Post-minimalist composers, but also on musicians working in the electronic dance world.  One of them is Francesco Tristano, who brings electronica’s repeating motifs back to the piano in his solo piece “The Melody.”  We’ll hear that, as well as several of William Duckworth’s “Time Curve Preludes,” often considered the first major Post-minimalist work, and a work from the late Canadian composer Ann Southam directly inspired by Glass’s piano works.

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New Sounds

Post-Minimalist Music

Tuesday, April 05, 2011

Philip Glass’s piano works have had a longstanding and widespread influence – on the so-called Post-minimalist composers, but also on musicians working in the electronic dance world.  One of them is Francesco Tristano, who brings electronica’s repeating motifs back to the piano in his solo piece “The Melody.”  We’ll hear that, as well as several of William Duckworth’s “Time Curve Preludes,” often considered the first major Post-minimalist work, and a work from the late Canadian composer Ann Southam directly inspired by Glass’s piano works.

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Hammered!

A Musical Thanksgiving

Monday, November 29, 2010

Igor Stravinsky once said "Good composers don't imitate, they steal." They emulate formal structures (compare Schumann's Third Symphony to Brahms's Third Symphony), they steal melodic lines (that trumpet lick at the beginning of Bartok's Second Piano Concerto was pretty clearly ganked from Firebird), and sometimes, in more overt expressions of indebtedness, they say "thank you." This week on Hammered! - Q2's hour-long showcase of contemporary piano music - we highlight tributes, tombeaus, homages and other musical thank you cards.

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