Streams

 

Andrew Cuomo

The Empire

Nate Silver: Cuomo is 'still introducing himself' to New Yorkers

Monday, January 24, 2011

Nate Silver has a counter-intuitive take on why Andrew Cuomo is proceeding so cautiously into his first budget presentation: despite the large election he won, he isn't coming to Albany with much of a mandate.

Appearing on the New Yrok Times Close-Up this weekend, Silver said:

Cuomo won a weird election. it was more of an anti-[Carl]Paladino vote. It wasn't really a mandate, despite the size of the margin. He had a very low turnout throughout the state. So, he's still introducing himself to New Yorkers. And I don't think we've really fully formed our opinions about him yet. So I think, especially now, his first major action - the way it's portrayed - could shape perceptions of him for months.

It is true that Cuomo won a large margin without doing much to raise the profile of the race. (He declined several opportunities to appear on national tv shows, or to give lengthy, possibly news-making speeches in places like Crain's business breakfast or the Association for a Better New York.)

But a recent Siena poll found Cuomo, and his agenda, pretty well-supported.

Read More

Comment

Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: Cuomo Talks MTA Payroll Tax, and Pregnancy May Have Its (Parking) Privileges

Monday, January 24, 2011

In Miami, a parking garage so beautiful, people get married there.  What can THIS mean for the future of driving?   And of public space? (NY Times)

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has unkind words for the MTA payroll tax. "It is a very onerous tax. Not just in this area." Meanwhile: "MTA CEO Jay Walder revealed that he'd yet to talk to the new governor about transit issues -- saying he'd been speaking with the governor's aides, instead." (New York Post)

But: Cuomo is keeping both Walder and Port Authority head Chris Ward on. (Crain's NY)

A NYC Councilman has proposed free parking for pregnant women. (NY Daily News)

Meantime, bobcats and lynx now have a new design for a crossing over I-70 in the Rockies (Denver Post)

The Twin Cities public transit system is "fraught with distrust" as feuding bureaucracies fail to set priorities in the best interests of the public. "People are interested in how decisions get made," said one suburban legislator. "I've asked, and I get a different answer from nearly everyone I ask."(Minneapolis Star-Tribune)

The Washington Post takes a look at the methodology behind the Texas Transportation Institute's recent report.

A summit to save debt-ridden Caltrain yielded ideas ranging from better coffee at stations, free Wi-Fi and business-class seating to toll lanes on Highway 101, tax increases and consolidating the Bay Area's multitude of transit agencies. (San Francisco Chronicle)

First Chicago, then DC...now Boston is considering selling naming rights to everything from the lines and stations of its subway, bus and commuter systems to its Web site, smart phone apps and Charlie Cards. “We want to do it tastefully and not over-commercialize the MBTA,” said general manager Richard Davey. “I would probably be reluctant to rename Park Street the Anheuser-Busch Park Street Station. But, at the same time ... we’re very open to hearing proposals.” (Boston Heral

Some of the Transportation Nation team is in DC this week at the Transportation Research Board conference. If you see people with microphones, emanating that public radio aura, say hello!

Top Transportation Nation stories that we’re following: Not all transportation projects create jobs equally. The Mayor of Tehran can't attend the ITDP awards. And: New York City taxi rides, visualized  in full color.

Follow Transportation Nation on Twitter.

Read More

Comment

The Empire

Unimpressed with Bloomberg and Cuomo's push on pension reforms

Friday, January 21, 2011

An unimpressed EJ McMahon questions Bloomberg's record on what he now calls the city's #1 priority (and adds some skepticism of the new governor too):

McMahon:

[T]he only pension change the mayor has, in effect, negotiated during his tenure (via a side deal with the teachers union) was exceedingly modest. For example, the taxpayer-guaranteed rate of return on teachers' tax-deferred annuity accounts was reduced from 8.25 to 7 percent. Try getting that on your personal retirement account.

Bloomberg expressed hope that Gov. Cuomo would support his agenda because Cuomo "campaigned on pension reform." If only that were actually true. On pensions, as on so many other issues, Cuomo has ranged from coy to vague, embracing the concept of reform with no details.

It's by no means clear that Cuomo will support Bloomberg -- and on collective bargaining, he absolutely shouldn't. But in this area, as on so many others, New York's governor may be the best hope for serious reform.

Read More

Comment

WNYC News

Cuomo's War Money: Millions for a Fight, Thousands for a Bonus

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

WNYC

As he prepares to wrestle against legislators and organized labor to control the state's $11 billion deficit, Governor Andrew Cuomo is arming himself with money.

Over the past month and a half, Mr. Cuomo raised $217,625.79, nearly four times as much as his predecessor, Democrat Eliot Spitzer, according to research by a government watchdog group. After spending nearly a million dollars between late November and mid-January, Mr. Cuomo has $4.17 million left on hand in his campaign account.

Comment

The Empire

Thousands in Bonuses to Cuomo top Aides

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Top campaign aides got tens of thousands of dollars in bonuses. (azi paybarah /wnyc)


Last month, after his landslide victory in the governor's race, Andrew Cuomo's campaign gave tens of thousands of dollars to top campaign operatives.

On December 8, the following checks were cut:

$90,000 to Joe Percoco.
$80,000 to Drew Zambelli.
$50,000 Benjamin Lawsky.

All three now work for the administration.

Percoco is now an "executive deputy secretary." Zambelli is now "counselor to the governor." And Lawsky is now the Chief of Staff.

A Cuomo campaign spokeswoman said the payouts were bonuses.

Read More

Comment

The Empire

Poll: Cuomo's agenda is almost entirely popular

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

image010

The only major proposal Andrew Cuomo is pushing that is not supported by a majority of New Yorkers is his call to let a tax on the rich expire. According to a Siena poll released today, 2/3 of voters want to continue tax increases on those making more than $200,000 annually.

Interestingly, only 42 percent of voters think the upcoming state budget will not include some form of tax increase.

Among Cuomo's most popular initiatives is his call for more transparency in the legislature. 84 percent say they support lawmakers having to disclose all their outside sources of income.

Read More

Comment

WNYC News

Poll Shows Cuomo's Honeymoon, Lingering Doubts about Legislature

Monday, January 17, 2011

WNYC

Newly-minted Governor Andrew Cuomo has a 70 percent approval rating, according to a Siena poll released Monday. He received overwhelmingly higher marks than the state legislature, which fewer than one in five New Yorkers trust to do the right thing for the state.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

Redesigning Medicaid: One Lawmaker Explains the Challenges

Thursday, January 13, 2011

WNYC

The Medicaid Redesign Team is holding their first public meeting in Albany on Thursday to begin tackling one of the thorniest problems facing the new governor: cutting the cost of the program without facing a backlash from health providers or patients.

The challenges facing the group are daunting. Aside from coming up with a consensus — which observers say may not even happen — the timetable for enacting any solution won’t yield immediate results. Federal approval is required. And the scope of their options is limited.

“Many of the ideas that get put on the table don’t necessarily save a lot of money,” said Assemblyman Dick Gottfried, a Democrat from Manhattan and a member of the 27-person team. “Many ideas take a year or two to implement so they don’t do you any good in this year’s budget.”

Comment

The Empire

Cuomo and the unknown supporters

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Governor Cuomo didn't seek to make an example of the Committee to Save NY,which is not disclosing the source of their income.

At a press conference today, Cuomo - who made transparency a signature issue - was asked if the the pro-business group that is running ads in support of his agenda should reveal where they are getting their money from.

"That's up to them," Cuomo said, before taking the next question on an unrelated matter.

Read More

Comment

The Empire

Silver unlinks two important issues

Monday, January 10, 2011

Despite earlier reports, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver said he's not linking his call to renew rent regulations laws to Governor Cuomo's call for a cap on property taxes.

At the end of Silver's media availability, he was asked if he agreed to pass "a tax cap without rent control."

"Of course I did," Silver says.

Read More

Comment

The Empire

Doubting Cuomo's stakeholders

Monday, January 10, 2011

Jacob Gershman plunges into the problem Andrew Cuomo faces by bringing major unions into the discussion about how to lower state spending, which they normally oppose:

What happens if a consensus never materializes or it serves the interest of the policy teams over the interests of the public? In other words, what is Mr. Cuomo prepared to do if the stakeholders start to behave like special interests?

Some see an implicit threat in Mr. Cuomo's approach, that he'll use the hammer of his executive budget if they don't cooperate and try to impose cuts on his own terms.

For now, the interest groups say they're game and receptive to the governor's demands for lower spending. But it's hard to see how Mr. Cuomo will avoid a painful conflict, particularly when there's less money to go around than in past years and when he starts to wade into the issue of public-employee retirement costs.

Mr. Cuomo is counting on interest groups to recognize their stake in the state's future. It remains to be seen if they instead decide to stick a stake into the heart of his agenda.

Read More

Comments [1]

The Empire

Newsday's other Albany Reporter

Friday, January 07, 2011

A bit more about the changes at Newsday's Albany desk:

Joining Yancey Roy for the foreseeable future will be general assignment reporter Mike Amon. Aside from Long Island news, writes about other stuff too sometimes.

Also, Reid Pillifant has a look at how Albany reporters are bracing for life under Governor Cuomo. "I think they ought to be grateful," venerable New York Post state editor Fred Dicker says of Albany reporters covering the new governor.

Read More

Comment

The Brian Lehrer Show

Cuomo's Juvenile Justice Overhaul

Friday, January 07, 2011

Jeremy Travis, president of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at CUNY, talks about Governor Cuomo's plan to reform New York State's juvenile justice system. Travis headed Governor Paterson's task force on juvenile prisons, whose 2009 report found serious and widespread problems in the system.

→ Read More And Join The Conversation At It's A Free Country

It's A Free Country ®

Andrew Cuomo's Hopeful Bad News

Thursday, January 06, 2011

WNYC
After the last four years of dysfunction and corruption and watching New York spin down the drain, there’s at least hope now — cautious hope, given what we’ve seen — but at least there’s some hope, which we didn’t have the last couple of years.

Ken LovettDaily News Albany bureau chief

Comments [5]

It's A Free Blog

Cuomo's Mix Metaphors

Thursday, January 06, 2011

It’s not surprising that the new governor is speaking in imperfect symbols — the act of governing is imperfect and seldom allows simple symbols to go uncompromised. But the tension is not just in his rhetoric. It’s in his first substantive proposals as well.

Read More

Comment

WNYC News

Legislators and Albany Watchers Struck by Cuomo's Tough Tone on Spending

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

Freezing worker salaries, slashing the size of government by 20 percent, capping property taxes and delivering health care at a fraction of today’s cost: Governor Andrew Cuomo’s first State of the State speech was, according to one pundit, just what you’d expect….from a Republican.

Comments [3]

It's A Free Country ®

Keeping Score for Cuomo

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

Now that Governor Cuomo has taken office and given his first State of the State address, it's time to track what he does with his mandate. Here's a guide to the campaign promises Andrew Cuomo made as part of his "New NY Agenda." As he enacts these proposals, abandons them, or changes direction altogether, we'll be keeping score. For now, here's how the scorecard looks after the State of the State address.

Comments [1]

It's A Free Country ®

Cuomo and New York's Business

Wednesday, January 05, 2011

Business spends plenty of money focused on narrow industry interests. Same with organizaed labor and other special interest groups, they tend to focus narrowly. The challenge Cuomo will lay out today in his message is, "Okay, enough with your narrow interests. The whole place is falling apart. There is no more resource. The state can't support any of you unless we fix what's going on, unless we figure out how to grow our economy in a constructive way, get control of the taxes and that we grow our tax base by building our economy, not simply by raising taxes."

Kathryn Wylde, president and CEO of the Partnership for New York City

Comments [33]

WNYC News

Financial 411: New Year, New Governor: Part II

Tuesday, January 04, 2011

When New York's new governor Andrew Cuomo gives his first state of the state address Wednesday, he's expected to provide more details about his plans for tackling New York's estimated $9 billion budget deficit. He might also give a clue as to how he intends to transform a state government he says is considered "a national punch line."

Comment

WNYC News

Cuomo, in First State of State Speech, Vows Break From Tradition

Tuesday, January 04, 2011

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is expected use Wednesday's State of the State address to detail how he plans to tackle New York's fiscal crisis. Cuomo said he would use the address as a forum to discuss his specific plans for the state, including an expected call for a freeze in state worker salaries.

Comment