Streams

 

 

Amy Eddings

Features

I Say Tomato, You Say Arthritis

Friday, August 19, 2011

WNYC

Tomato season is here. Last weekend, my local farmers' market at Fort Greene Park had a beautiful display of jewel-like heirloom tomatoes. 

But many people avoid them.  Tomatoes are part of a potentially troublesome group of veggies known as "nightshades."

Comment

Features

Donuts with Less Guilt: Gluten-Free, Agave-Sweetened and Good

Friday, August 12, 2011

WNYC

My first sweet treat in three months fits my new eating habits and my taste buds.

Comments [3]

Features

Avocado Avocation

Monday, August 08, 2011

WNYC

Avocation means "a subordinate occupation pursued in addition to one's vocation, especially for enjoyment," but when it comes to avocados, I like the archaic usage. Merriam-Webster puts it as "diversion, distraction." And that's what avocados mean for me this time of year.

Comment

Features

Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Go Gourmet

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Meatballs, macaroni and cheese, and bacon have all had their makeovers in the kitchens of top chefs. It was the humble grilled cheese sandwich's turn this weekend at a community garden fundraiser in Brooklyn.

Comments [1]

Features

Amy Eddings' Food for Thought: No Pea Shoots? Grow Your Own

Friday, May 27, 2011

We talked about pea shoots in this week's edition of Last Chance Foods, and I have to admit, I've never eaten them. And I'm not noticing them at my farmers' market in Fort Greene Park or supermarket. Shauna Reid's suggestion? Grow your own.

Comments [1]

Last Chance Foods

Amy Eddings' Food for Thought: Oatmeal Cake

Friday, March 04, 2011

Some folks' idea of comfort food is meat loaf or macaroni and cheese.  Mine is oatmeal.  It's creamy and warm, but, more than that, it's a food my dad made for me and my siblings when we were little.

Comments [6]

Last Chance Foods

Amy Eddings' Food for Thought: Pepper

Friday, February 25, 2011

In my zeal to try different types of pepper, I bought two big bottles of whole pink and white peppercorns -- the pricey Morton & Bassett kind. I wanted to try red peppercorns, but I figured pink was the same thing. It's not.

Comments [1]

Last Chance Foods

Amy Eddings' Food for Thought: Sun Chokes & Salt

Friday, February 18, 2011

We're talking about sun chokes this week, but my head and taste buds are still with salt, our topic in last week's Last Chance Foods.  Many have commented on artisanal salt seller Mark Bitterman's contention that the link between salt and hypertension are not as clear-cut as public health officials would like to have you believe.

Comments [1]

WNYC News

Gowanus Canal: The Latest on Superfund Status

Monday, December 14, 2009

Oils, toxins, and refuse coagulate in the Gowanus Canal (by Stephen Nessen)

Oils, toxins, and refuse coagulate in the Gowanus Canal (by Stephen Nessen)

WNYC's Amy Eddings has been reporting on the Gowanus Canal and the debate on whether it should become a Superfund site ...

Comment

WNYC News

A Jordanian-American's First Feature Film

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Captain Abu Raed

Captain Abu Raed

'Captain Abu Raed,' the first film from Jordanian-American film maker Amin Matalqa, opens this week. The captain in question would like to have traveled around the world. But he's actually an airport janitor. Kids in his ...

Comment

WNYC News

Exercise Will Set You Free. Not!

Monday, August 10, 2009

exercise

Ask anyone the best way drop a few pounds and chances are you'll hear that if you exercise, you'll lose weight. But many adults who exercise at the gym or run or bike say their weight has remained the same year after year. A Time Magazine article says the basic problem is that while exercise burns calories, it can stimulate hunger. WNYC's Amy Eddings interviewed John Cloud who wrote the article.

Amy Eddings: First of all, you have got to be kidding me! No! For years we've been hearing that key to weight control was diet and exercise, diet and exercise, like peanut butter and jelly, together forever, one linked to the other -- and you're telling me now, no?

John Cloud: Right and let me just begin by saying exercise is not completely useless, in fact you want to exercise for all kinds of reasons for your heart health, for your mental health for your joints.

Eddings: But we want to get thin, John, we want to get taut.

Cloud: In terms of weight loss and exercise, there are a couple things going on. One study I quote at length in this story was a study with a group of women in Louisiana and Texas, 464 women who were recruited to exercise three to four times a week with a personal trainer. Their exercise was very carefully calibrated, their heart rates were measured. This was a serious exercise group. They were followed for six months. Their diets didn't change. In fact, they were told, 'Maintain your standard diet and everything'. They compared this group to a group of women who didn't exercise. All they did was fill out monthly forms detailing any medical symptoms they had.

At the end of the six months, they found that the women who exercised had lost no more weight than the women who all they did once a month was think about their health and their diets. They filled out these forms, which had the effect probably of causing them to eat a little bit less, so that they lost a little bit of weight, too.

The person who runs the study calls this phenomenon 'compensation.' Whether because you are hungrier or you reward yourself when you get home, you tend to eat more when you exercise a lot.

Eddings: If you rule out compensation. if people get honest with themselves and stop overeating after a hard work out, then does exercise help?

'In general, for weight loss, exercise is pretty useless,' Eric Ravussin, chair in diabetes and metabolism at Louisiana State University and a prominent exercise researcher.

Cloud: Sure, but we're not really built very well to do that. You know a lot of people have this up and down roller coaster thing with their weight. They'll either go on a diet or they'll adopt some exercise regimen. In the year 2000, these psychologists published a pretty well-known paper in psychology circles about self control. They observed in this paper that self control is like a muscle. If you go out and go running for an hour, it's going to be much harder to get back home and make decisions about anything really, but particularly about food. You've already done this great thing for yourself. That's just kind of how we're built psychologically.

Comment